LEAH SCHRAGER

Infinity Selfies

Leah Schrager Infinity Selfies

source:leahschragercom
Leah Schrager is a digital artist and online performer. She is the model, photographer, artist, and marketer in/of her images. Her visual works apply a painterly aesthetic to bodily forms and often draw their material from her conceptual online practice. Her online performances are @OnaArtist (Instagram 3m) and Sarah White (The Naked Therapist). With these performances, Schrager explores themes of sexuality, representation, and distribution. Her practice is situated in a contemporary hotbed of female (in)appropriateness, arousal, celebrity, fandom, and commercialism that seeks to explore female biography and labor in today’s global society.

Schrager has been compared by journalists to such seminal figures as Marina Abramovic, Marcel Duchamp, Laurel Nakadate, Diane Fossey, and Sigmund Freud. She and/or her work has been profiled in 1000′s of media outlets, including Art Forum, Monopol, The Huffington Post, Vice, Viceland, The Tonight Show with Jay Leno, CBS News, ABC News, The NY Daily News, and Playboy. She has exhibited with Johannes Vogt Gallery, Castor Gallery, Untitled Space, Roman Fine Art, ArtHelix Gallery, and the Museum of Visual Art in Leipzig.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:awomensthingorg
LEAH SCHRAGER IS A WOMAN OF HER TIMES. USING SOCIAL MEDIA AS HER GALLERY, SCHRAGER’S ART EXPLORES DIGITAL IDENTITY, CELEBRITY CULTURE AND THE ALMIGHTY SELFIE.
A RESONANT VOICE IN THE NEW FEMINIST ART WAVE, SCHRAGER’S WORK OFTEN TRIUMPHS SEX POSITIVITY BY REFRAMING THE POWER DYNAMIC BETWEEN MODEL AND PHOTOGRAPHER AND CHALLENGING THE NOTION THAT PROVOCATIVE IMAGERY IS LESS THAN ART.

TAKING THE “SOCIAL” OF “SOCIAL MEDIA” TO HEART, SCHRAGER’S CURATORIAL WORK IS ALSO WORTH NOTING. HER ONLINE EXHIBITION BODY ANXIETY (2015) BROUGHT TOGETHER FEMALE ARTISTS WHOSE WORK COVERS SELF-REPRESENTATION AND PERFORMANCE ON THE INTERNET. HER LATEST CURATORIAL ENDEAVOR, ARTGIRLTV, TURNS SNAPCHAT INTO A LIVE ART PORTAL BY FEATURING FEMALE ARTIST AND ART VIEWER TAKEOVERS BY GIRL ARTISTS ACROSS THE WORLD.

WE CHATTED WITH SCHRAGER ABOUT WOMEN’S PLACE IN THE ART WORLD AND THE SOCIAL CRITICISM THAT COMES WITH STARRING IN ONE’S OWN WORK.

How does starring in your own work in a provocative way affect your day-to-day life? Do you get recognized on the street?
Leah Schrager: I’m not recognized on the street because I’m very different when I’m performing for my camera. It’s interesting because I’ve always felt really different IRL than I am online. I very much “perform” online. In my real life, I’m a normal person. The Instagram account started off on a rather bad note in terms of my family having trouble with it, and friends from middle school and high school having trouble with it. It’s so weird—I put up a sexy photo and everyone freaks out. It was really difficult. I’m still trying to figure out what it means.

There’s definitely something to the fact that I have an M.F.A., so everyone’s like, “Why are you throwing everything away?” On principle though, I think it’s wrong to judge a person by an image of them because the judgment is how we censor and keep women from being free. But it’s rampant in society. It’s so bad to treat anybody like that, to say that putting up an image of yourself, whether it’s sexy or not, would hurt your career. But I do know that I’ve cut off a lot of professional opportunities for myself. I’ve had galleries say they’re not interested because I have photos of my ass online. I think it’s a really interesting time for women.

Also, it’s weird because this regulation of what a woman does with her image comes both from people who identify as feminists and people who identify as conservative. It’s hard in that way. It’s pretty unpleasant and very emotional actually. I’m hoping that in doing it and also seeing other people do it and speak out about it, that it will mean change for people and for the next generation of women.

I never really expected that this was what I was getting into. In a way, the message behind my current work, Ona, Celebrity Project is a lot less radical than the Naked Therapy (2010) that I did before. But for some reason, I’ve felt a lot more controversy around this project. Perhaps because it’s closer to home. I’ve seen a lot of people talking about it lately too which is cool, like Emily Ratajkowski from a model’s perspective and Bree Olson from a porn perspective. I feel like people are talking about it but we’re still really far from society as a whole embracing it. It affects all women though, and I wish we could get to the point of freedom and non-judgementalism.

Wow, that was a lot of negative stuff. But the good part is, it’s really fun and interesting. I didn’t expect my Instagram account to do so well, but it just sort of took off. I’ve learned a lot about how Instagram works, which is cool. It’s led me to meet more people and to have a different perspective on where art is happening and what’s interesting in art. I’m creating a lot of work. It’s very much in progress.

Are there any other milestone moments that you’re proud of?
Leah Schrager: Being covered by Artforum [Women on the Verge, April 2015] was really exciting and unexpected. I actually see curating the show Body Anxiety as a precursor to ArtGirlTV. I picked women who had some relationship to their image in their work.

And I’m starting to sell my artwork to collectors, which is really exciting. I was meeting with a curator yesterday and she said she’s doing an art show about women and social media and that she has a lot of artists who are negatively critical about social media. She said that she liked me because I seemed to be more celebratory of it. And I definitely am, so I’m hoping that I can start carving out a bit of a niche in terms of being pro-social. It has such positive potential. A lot of that comes from Naked Therapy. I have been really able to help people, and that was completely through the Internet. It was true, good helping. I think that people get so down on the Internet and porn and all this stuff, but I think that part of the issue is that people are so negative. Then there’s all this guilt that gets associated with it and it’s not helping anything. Hopefully, people will start recognizing that we want a full spectrum of approaches.

Leah Schrager, from Digital Paintings, Acrylics on Inkjet, 2014
Was there a time when you felt yourself coming into your own? Or have you always felt as comfortable with yourself as you appear now?
Leah Schrager: I’ve been coming into my own since I started, I guess. But when I was first starting—I mark the beginning of this creative trajectory to around 2009—it took a long time of having my work out there and getting responses to my work and engagements with my work to figure out more and more what it was that I really wanted to say with it. I’ve also honed in on what I want to say and what is fully open to interpretation. I know that and am fine with the fact that when I put my work out there it’s not didactic—there are many possible interpretations. Now I work only with my own image and that’s definitely a process that I went through figuring out. My M.F.A. program was useful for that actually, in that it was a constant challenge due to people not really liking my work because “sexy isn’t supposed to be art.” So I had to keep fighting for why it was ok for my image to be in my work. It made me in a way even more set on that. It’s hard to remember while you’re in it, when you feel frustrated and upset, but opposition is often a sign that you’re doing something you’re truly invested in and you want to try to figure out more and understand. It’s been five years of that, really. That’s another thing: sometimes you don’t realize until five years later what it was you were trying to do five years ago. It takes time.

Leah Schrager’s art is viewable now via Instagram on her main account @leahschrager and also @onaartist, the digital home of Ona, Schrager’s alter ego project. Add ArtGirlTV on Snapchat for daily, global, girl-powered art experiences.
Image courtesy Leah Schrager. Featured image from Leah’s series “Infinity Selfie, or SFSM (safe for social media), digital C-prints, 2016”
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:gallerytalknet
Fame, Sex und Instagram. Leah Schrager erweitert in ihrer künstlerischen Praxis die Grenzen von Kunst, Erotik, Performance, Prominenz und Feminismus. Einige Arbeiten von Leah Schrager sind derzeit Teil der viel beachteten Ausstellung „Virtual Normality – Netzkünstlerinnen 2.0“ im Museum der bildenden Künste in Leipzig. Wir konnten die Künstlerin nach ihrem Ansatz befragen.

gallerytalk.net: Du hast in deinem Werk unterschiedliche Charaktere etabliert. Du warst die nackte Therapeutin Sarah White und als ONA hast du mehr als 1,4 Millionen Follower auf Instagram. Wie gut, meinst du, unterscheiden die Menschen in Ihrer Wahrnehmung zwischen diesen Charakteren und der Künstlerin Leah Schrager?
Leah Schrager: Eigentlich bin ich mir nicht sicher, ob diese unterschiedlichen „Wirs“, auf die du dich beziehst, dieselbe Person sind. Sie haben so unterschiedliche Ziele. Sie teilen nicht die gleichen Freunde, Welten, kulturellen Vorlieben oder gar Arbeitszeiten.

Wie differenzierst du selbst? Sind es Rollen, die du spielst oder überschneiden sie sich auch? Oder ist diese Frage überhaupt relevant?
Rollenspiel ist ein oberflächlicher Begriff für eine temporäre Identität. Die sozial vermittelte Welt, in der ich/wir agieren, ist keine Sache, die wir „anprobieren“, wie verschiedene Kleidungsstücke oder Kostüme. Ich glaube, es ist ein radikaler Bruch in der Art und Weise, wie wir uns selbst heute verstehen. Es könnte als eine alternative Form des Bewusstseins beschrieben werden, die jeden von uns auf einer „granularen“ Ebene durchdringt. Ich treibe mich in diesem neuen omni-dimensionalen Raum herum, und je nachdem, wann ich gefragt werde, fühle ich mich entweder beschwingt, erschrocken oder erschöpft davon, als wäre es alles real, was es schließlich ja auch ist.

In deiner Arbeit sprichst du Konzepte wie Selbstvermarktung und Ausbeutung an. Siehst du es als einen Akt der (Selbst-) Ermächtigung an, solche Methoden aktiv und bewusst einzusetzen?
Als ONA sprechend, ja. Es ermächtigt mich ja tatsächlich finanziell, sozial, künstlerisch, emotional, und psychologisch. Und ein Teil dieser Ermächtigung kommt durch gelenkte und sogar unkontrollierbare Formen der Ausbeutung, die ich so gut wie möglich zu meinem eigenen Vorteil nutze.

In einem deiner Texte schreibst du über den unterschiedlichen Wert, den eine Gesellschaft Frauen zubilligt. Die Gesellschaft unterscheide zwischen Frauen, die „zu Kunst gemacht werden“ und Frauen, die selbst „Kunst machen“. In deiner künstlerischen Praxis erfüllst du beide Rollen?
Kontrolle über die eigene Marke zu besitzen, ist das Ziel aller Künstler. Ansonsten „vermieten“ sie sich nur an jemand anderen. Künstlerinnen machen diesen Fehler schon seit langem. Ich plane, diesen Fehler zu vermeiden.

Kannst du bestimmte KünstlerInnen nennen, die deine Arbeit beeinflusst haben?
Laurel Nakadate, Marina Abromovic, Eva Hesse, Cindy Sherman.

Dein künstlerischer Ansatz ist ausgesprochen sexuell aufgeladen. Ist die Art und Weise, wie dieser Aspekt wahrgenommen wird, in welchem Kontext, Teil deines Denkprozesses?
In der Kunst geht es immer um den Körper. Ich mag es, meinen Körper zu benutzen, um Kunst zu machen und habe festgestellt, dass mein Körper auch benutzt werden kann, um Geld zu verdienen. Ich mag es besonders, wenn diese beiden Aspekte, durch die Anstrengungen meines Körpers, gleichzeitig passieren. Kunst zu machen, die sich nicht auf eine Sprache sexueller Erregung einlässt, fühlt sich für mich tot an, wie Berge, die kein Wasser bekommen. Der Kontext des sexuellen Begehrens verbindet und begeistert meine ästhetischen Neigungen, durch meinen organischen Drang zu kopulieren, mich zu zeigen, gewollt zu werden, gekauft zu werden, kraftvoll zu sein. Es ist eine lebendige Kunst, die für Entitäten von Bedeutung ist, die daran arbeiten, mittels Vergnügen zu überleben.

Wie wird dein Celebrity-Projekt ONA weitergehen?
ONA und ich werden alles in unserer Macht Stehende tun, um eine maximale Exposure zu erreichen. Ich werde Musik, Musikvideos (bekleidet kostenlos, nackt gegen Bezahlung) und Merchandise online verkaufen. Im März werde ich meine „Undisclosed Location Tour“ mit 10 Terminen im Laufe des Jahres beginnen. Fans können Tickets für jedes Datum kaufen, und dieses Ticket verschafft ihnen Zugang zu meiner privaten Pay-per-view-Tourshow, bei der ich per Webcam zu meinen Songs tanze und singe, mit Stripping und Happy End. Es wird auch viel Snap-Chat und Instagram Live-Übertragungen während meiner Zeit an jedem unbekannten Ort geben. Zudem will ich einen Dokumentarfilm über meine Leistung herausbringen, 1 Million Anhänger auf Instagram zu erreichen, und ich werde einen Film über meine „Undisclosed Location Tour“ drehen. Außerdem werde ich Kunstwerke verkaufen, die in Verbindung mit jedem Song, Musikvideo und Fotoshooting entstanden sind, während der Produktion des Albums. Dann im Jahr 2019 werde ich mein zweites Album veröffentlichen und am 1. Januar 2020 endet dann alles. An diesem Punkt werde ich eine Einschätzung vornehmen. Meine Ziele waren schon immer: 10 Millionen Social-Media-Anhänger, ein Foto von meinem Arsch auf dem Cover des Rolling Stone Magazin, 1 Million Song-Downloads und die Repräsentanz durch eine große Galerie.

Warum ist Instagram deiner Meinung nach die am besten geeignete Plattform für deine Arbeit?
Der Hashtag ist die sozial vermittelte DNA unserer neuen digitalen Körper im Internet. Die Rekombination und Vermehrung der eigenen Reichweite ist eine Form von Social Media-Gen-Technologie. Instagram ist die derzeit beste Möglichkeit, unsere sozial vermittelten Körper neu aufzuteilen. Ich gehe aber davon aus, dass in Kürze schon neuere und elegantere Formen zur Verfügung stehen werden.

WANN: Die Ausstellung Virtual Normality – Netzkünstlerinnen 2.0 ist noch bis zum 8. April zu sehen.
WO: Museum der bildenden Künste Leipzig, Katharinenstraße 10, 04109 Leipzig.