ISAAC JULIEN

Isaac Julien Ten Thousand Waves

source:momaorg
Ten Thousand Waves (2010) is an immersive film installation projected onto nine double-sided screens arranged in a dynamic structure. Especially conceived for The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, the installation choreographs visitors’ movement through the space. The original inspiration for this recently acquired, 55-minute moving image installation was the Morecambe Bay tragedy of 2004, in which more than 20 Chinese cockle pickers drowned on a flooded sandbank off the coast in northwest England.

Julien poetically interweaves contemporary Chinese culture with its ancient myths—including the fable of the goddess Mazu (portrayed in the piece by Maggie Cheung), which comes from the Fujian Province, from where the Morecambe Bay workers originated. In one section, the Tale of Yishan Island, Julien recounts the story of 16th-century fishermen lost and imperiled at sea. Central to the legend is the sea goddess figure who leads the fishermen to safety. In a preceding section, shot at the Shanghai Film Studios, actress Zhao Tao takes part in a reenactment of the classic 1930s Chinese film The Goddess. Additional collaborators include calligrapher Gong Fagen, the film and video artist Yang Fudong, cinematographer Zhao Xiaoshi, and poet Wang Ping, from whom Julien commissioned “Small Boats,” a poem that is recited in Ten Thousand Waves.

The installation is staged on the streets of both modern and old Shanghai, and includes music and sounds that fuse Eastern and Western traditions. The installation’s sound structure is as immersive as its sequenced images, with contributions from, among others, London-based musician Jah Wobble and the Chinese Dub Orchestra, and an original score by Spanish contemporary classical composer Maria de Alvear.

London-based Julien is an internationally acclaimed artist and filmmaker. After graduating from St. Martin’s School of Art in London in 1985, he came to prominence with his 1989 drama-documentary Looking for Langston, a poetic exploration of Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance. Informed by his film background, Julien’s gallery installations form fractured narratives that reflect critical thinking about race, globalization, and representation. In 2008 MoMA coproduced Julien’s film Derek (2008), a filmic biography of the late British filmmaker Derek Jarman.

Ten Thousand Waves was conceived and created over four years. In a reflection of the movement of people across continents, audiences move freely around the Marron Atrium, with the ability to watch from whichever vantage points they choose.

Organized by Sabine Breitwieser, former Chief Curator (until January 31, 2013), with Martin Hartung, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Media and Performance Art.

In conjunction with the film
series Critical Reverie:
The Films of Isaac Julien
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:victoriamirocom
Isaac Julien’s critically acclaimed, nine screen film installation TEN THOUSAND WAVES – starring Maggie Cheung, the legendary siren of Chinese cinema – is to receive its London premiere at the Hayward Gallery on 13 October, as part of the exhibition Move: Choreographing You. To coincide with the exhibition Victoria Miro is delighted to present a new body of photographic work also titled TEN THOUSAND WAVES.

Made on location in China this epic work poetically weaves together stories linking the nation’s ancient past and present. Through an elaborate architectural installation the work explores the movement of people across countries and continents and meditates on unfinished journeys. A single screen version of the film called Better Life, premiered at The Venice Film Festivalthis month, where the Telegraph’s David Gritten, descibed it as “a sorrowful, strong and haunting work”.

Conceived and made over four years, TEN THOUSAND WAVES sees Julien collaborating with some of China’s leading artistic voices, including: screen goddess Maggie Cheung; rising star of Chinese film Zhao Tao; poet Wang Ping; master calligrapher Gong Fagen; artist Yang Fudong; acclaimed cinematographer Zhao Xiaoshi; and a 100-strong Chinese cast and crew. The film’s original musical score is by fellow East Londoner Jah Wobble and The Chinese Dub Orchestra and contemporary classical composer Maria de Alvear.

Filmed on location in the ravishing and remote Guangxi province and at the famous Shanghai Film Studios and various sites around Shanghai, TEN THOUSAND WAVES combines fact, fiction and film essay genres against a background of Chinese history, legend and landscape to create a meditation on global human migrations. Through formal experimentation and a series of unique collaborations, Julien seeks to engage with Chinese culture through contemporary events, ancient myths and artistic practice.

The original inspiration for TEN THOUSAND WAVES was the Morecambe Bay tragedy of 2004, in which 23 Chinese cockle-pickers died. In response to this event, Julien commissioned the poet Wang Ping to come to England and write Small Boats, a poem that is recited in the work. In the successive years, Julien has spent time in China slowly coming to understand the country and its people’s perspectives and developing the relationships that have enabled him to undertake this rich and multifaceted work.

Through conversations with academics, curators and artists both in China and the UK, Julien uncovered a symbolic body of material which he has used to create a work that explores modern and traditional Chinese values and superstitions. These are encapsulated in a fable about the goddess Mazu (played by Maggie Cheung) that comes from Fujian Province, from where the Morecambe Bay cockle-pickers originated. The Tale of Yishan Island tells the tale of 16th Century fishermen lost and in danger at sea. At the heart of the legend is the goddess figure who leads the fishermen to safety. Using this fable as a starting point Julien deftly draws on this story and the poignant connection between it and the 21st Century tragedy of Chinese migrants who died struggling to survive in the North of England.

Following ideas surrounding death, spiritual displacement, and the uniquely Chinese connection with ‘ghosts’ or ‘lost souls’, the film links the Shanghai of the past and present, symbolising the Chinese transition towards modernity, aspiration and affluence. Here, Julien employs the visual language of ghost stories, with recurrent figures and images appearing and disappearing. Mazu’s spectral figure traverses time and space, serving as a guide through the interlocking strands of the work. Mirroring the goddess of the fable, a ghostly protagonist (Zhao Tao) leads us through the world of Shanghai cinema via the Shanghai Film Studio, to a restaging by Julien of scenes from the classic Chinese film The Goddess (1934), and finally to the streets of Modern and Old Shanghai.

Isaac Julien is as equally acclaimed for his fluent, arresting films as his vibrant and inventive gallery installations. TEN THOUSAND WAVES is his most ambitious project to date with the nine-screen installation forming a dynamic structure which choreographs the viewers experience of the multiple narratives. Julien deploys the visual and aural textures of the film to elicit a visceral response from the viewer, submerging them in the world of his making.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:culturaniteroicombr
A partir de 03 de setembro de 2016, o Salão Principal do Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Niterói recebe a videoinstalação “Ten Thousand Waves”, do inglês Isaac Julien. Com curadoria de Luiz Guilherme Vergara, a exposição faz parte do núcleo central do “Programa Baía de Guanabara: águas e vidas escondidas”. Na instalação, o artista dialoga com a arquitetura de Niemeyer, criando uma visualização fluída desde o interior do museu. “Ten Thousand Waves” fica em cartaz até 06 de novembro.

A inspiração para a obra, uma videoinstalação composta por nove telas de exibição, foi a tragédia da Baía de Morecambe (Inglaterra), onde mais de 20 catadores de mariscos ilegalmente vindos da China morreram afogados. No filme, Julien resgata a memória da deusa chinesa Mazu, antiga protetora dos pescadores e mares. “Ten Thousand Waves” explora questões de transculturalidade e migração global e é uma das obras mais icônicas de Julien, já tendo sido exibida em lugares como no Museum of Modern Art (MoMA – NY), no SESC Pompéia e na Fondation Louis Vuitton (Paris).

Isaac Julien

Isaac Julien nasceu em 1960 em Londres, cidade onde vive e trabalha. Formado em pintura e cinema de arte pela St. Martins School of Art em 1984, criou seu primeiro coletivo de cinema, o Sankofa Film and Video Collective um ano antes, em 1983. Ganhou notoriedade no cinema no início dos anos 90, quando venceu o Prémio da Crítica no Festival de Cannes pelo filme Young Soul Rebels (1991).

Julien foi um dos primeiros artistas a usar diversas telas como um formato de instalação. Um dos pontos fortes do artista é exatamente sua busca por uma nova compreensão da realidade, articulando diferentes elementos. filmes, danças, fotografias, músicas, pinturas e esculturas são alguns dos elementos inseridos pelo artista em suas instalações.

Julien apresentou seus trabalhos na Documenta 11 (2002), na 7ª Bienal de Gwangju (2008) e na Trienal de Paris (2012). O artista também teve diversas exposições individuais em instituições como o Art Institute of Chicago (2013), MCA San Diego (2012), Bass Museum, Miami (2010) e Centre Pompidou (2005), entre outras. No inverno de 2013-2014, sua instalação Ten Thousand Waves, de 2010, ficou exposta no Museu de Arte Moderna de Nova York, projetada em nove telas frente e verso numa configuração dinâmica concebida especialmente para o The Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium, átrio do museu.

A mais recente exposição de Isaac Julien no De Pont Museum foi a retrospectiva Riot, que cobriu trinta anos de sua carreira. Para a 56aBienal de Veneza, em colaboração com o curador Okwui Enwezor, Isaac Julien está dirigindo uma série de performances, leituras e projeções relacionadas a O Capital, de Marx, além de uma instalação de sua obra homônima, KAPITAL (2013). A nova instalação de Isaac Julien, Stones Against Diamonds, também vai estrear durante a Bienal, como parte do programa Rolls Royce Art. A obra de Julien está representada em coleções de instituições do mundo todo. Em 213, Riot, uma monografia sobre sua carreira até o momento, foi publicada pelo MoMA de Nova York.

Ele também ganhou o Prêmio McDermott do MIT e o Prêmio The Golden Gate Persistence of Vision (2014) no Festival de Cinema de São Francisco. Em 2015, recebeu o Prêmio Kaino por Excelência Artística.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:fotografiskacom
För tio år sedan försvann 23 kinesiska hjärtmusselplockare till havs utanför Morecambe Bays kust i nordvästra England. I den mycket hyllade, fängslande installationen Ten Thousand Waves (2010) väver den brittiska konstnären Isaac Julien samman den tragiska händelsen med kinesisk kultur, historia och mytologi. Verket är en 55 minuter lång upplevelse på nio skärmar, där åskådaren bjuds in att röra sig fritt genom installationen.

Med ett rikt bildspråk som växlar mellan den kalla kusten i nordvästra England, den larmande rusningstrafiken i Shanghai och det frodiga kinesiska landskapet av bambuskog och steniga berg i Guangxiprovinsen, representerar Ten Thousand Waves en ny form av filmiskt berättande. Ten Thousand Waves, som visas för första gången i Sverige, fyller Fotografiskas största utställningsyta med en specialutformad installation. På nio skärmar visar Julien ett slags parallellt montage, vilket inbjuder åskådarna till att vandra runt i verket, upptäcka det och interagera med det på nya sätt.

Ten Thousand Waves omfattar flera poetiskt sammanvävda lager och berättelser. Från polishelikopterns filmupptagningar från den ödesdigra natten i Morecambe Bay till havsgudinnan Mazu, beskyddare av fiskare och skeppsbrutna, via 1930-talets Shanghai, tar Juliens montage oss med genom sammankopplade lager av kinesisk kultur, historia och mytologi.

Genom att koppla samman nutiden med det förflutna utforskar Juliens verk människors migration över kontinenter och länder. ”Jag frågade mig själv varför man reser från Kina till Storbritannien för att plocka musslor” berättar Julien i en intervju, ”Vad är motivet? Hur långt är du beredd att gå för att uppnå ett bättre liv?”. Verket berör även historien om konstnärens föräldrar, som kom från Karibien med båt över Atlanten för att söka efter ett bättre liv i Storbritannien. ”Det här är ett väldigt personligt verk. Arbetskraftsmigrationen debatteras mycket just nu, vilket jag inte tycker är särskilt välvilligt mot människor som söker efter ett bättre liv. Jag ville göra ett verk som kunde vara ett slags upprättelse.”

Verket, som i huvudsak spelades in i Kina, tog fyra år att producera. Välkända skådespelare som Maggie Cheung och Zhao Tao, videokonstnären Yang Fudong, poeten Wang Ping och den kinesiska kalligrafen Gong Fagen medverkar. Filmmusiken, som sammanför musikaliska traditioner från öst och väst, är komponerad av Jah Wobble och Chinese Dub Orchestra och innehåller även originalmusik av den samtida klassiska kompositören Maria de Alvear.

Isaac Juliens verk är kritiska betraktelser över globalisering och representation. Han föddes 1960 i London, där han fortfarande har sin bas, och tog examen vid St. Martins School of Art, efter att ha studerat måleri och film. Han uppmärksammades på 1980-talet för sina poetiska dokumentärer och videoinstallationer och är idag en internationellt känd konstnär och filmskapare.

Isaac Julien grundade Sankofa Film and Video Collective, där han var verksam 1983-1992. Han var också en av grundarna till Normal Films 1991. 1989 producerade han dramadokumentären Looking for Langston, en poetisk betraktelse av Langston Hughes och Harlem Renaissance. Under 2008 samarbetade Julien med MoMA i en filmproduktion om den brittiska filmmakaren Derek Jarman.

Isaac Juliens verk har visats på många av världens ledande internationella museer, filmfestivaler och konstbiennaler, inklusive Documenta i Kassel 2002. Julien har mottagit en rad utmärkelser och 2001 nominerades han till Turnerpriset för The Long Road to Mazatlán. Ten Thousand Waves har hittills visats i mer än 15 länder, senast i Donald B. and Catherine C. Marron Atrium på MoMA i New York.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:artishockrevistacom
Wang Ping, The Great Summons

En medio de la espesa niebla, una balsa atraviesa un río rodeado de montañas verdes. La cumbre de un cerro recortada contra el celeste límpido del cielo. Rascacielos enormes en China. De noche, una prostituta espera en una esquina, en una escena que parece sacada de Con ánimo de amar de Wong Kar-Wai. Otra referencia cinéfila: la actriz Maggie Cheung, de blanco, vuela a través de los bosques. O vuela en un set de filmación, contra paredes de fondo verde, sujetada por esas cuerdas tan frecuentes en las películas recientes de artes marciales. Una voz que susurra “ven a casa”, “todos tus deseos no son tus deseos”. Son sólo algunas de las imágenes y sonidos que se quedan en la memoria tras ver Ten Thousand Waves, una instalación de nueve pantallas de Isaac Julien que actualmente se exhibe en el MoMA.

Isaac Julien es un multifacético cineasta y artista británico, figura clave de eso que en los ochenta se denominó Black British Cinema, movimiento cinematográfico articulado fundamentalmente a partir del trabajo de colectivos, como el Sankofa Film and Video Collective, conformado por Martina Attille, Maureen Blackwood, Nadine Marsh-Edwards, Robert Crusz, y el propio Julien. Quizás la obra cúlmine de ese período es Looking for Langston (1989), exploración lírica de la vida del poeta del Harlem Renaissance Langston Hughes, donde se lo presenta como un ícono de la cultura gay negra, estableciendo paralelos atmosféricos entre el Harlem de los años veinte y la escena de nightclubs londinenses de los ochenta. Más recientemente, Julien ha pasado a ser figura clave de una tendencia de las artes visuales contemporáneas: aquella que pone a dialogar al cine en y con el museo. En los últimos años, sus instalaciones –Dungeness (2008), Fantôme Créole (2005) y Lost Boundaries (2003), entre otras- se han exhibido en lugares como la Goetz Collection, Metro Pictures Gallery, Galeria Nara Roesler, EYE Filmmuseum, o Tate Modern.

Isaac Julien, Ten Thousand Waves, 2010, video instalación de nueve canales (color, sonido), 49;41 min, Vista de instalación en el The Museum of Modern Art, Nueva York, Foto Jonathan Muzikar
Isaac Julien, Ten Thousand Waves, 2010, video instalación de nueve canales (color, sonido), 49;41 min, Vista de instalación en el The Museum of Modern Art, Nueva York, Foto Jonathan Muzikar

En una trayectoria sobresaliente como la de Julien, Ten Thousand Waves destaca como una obra en la que confluyen de manera clara, pero no menos compleja, su sensibilidad estética, su discurso político, y su continua interrogación por el lugar de la imagen cinematográfica en el circuito del arte contemporáneo. Hay múltiples maneras de abordar esta instalación enorme y que parece inabarcable, pero la biografía del artista nos permite dos puntos de entrada: una mirada postcolonial, y una que estudia al cine en el museo.

Partamos por lo segundo. Angela Dalle Vache argumenta que “como una forma de cambio momificado, o de duración embalsamada, el cine y el museo se han especializado respectivamente en la percepción del paso del tiempo y en la exhibición de los rastros del pasado”. Algo de exploración historiográfica, como veremos más adelante, hay en Ten Thousand Waves. Pero se podría decir que lo que predomina es una preocupación espacial, casi arquitectónica, algo que entrelaza la narrativa cinematográfica de la instalación con su disposición museística.

Son nueve pantallas dobles que conforman una coreografía de imágenes en el atrio del MoMA, a la vez que suponen una coreografía de los cuerpos de los espectadores, que se desplazan por el espacio de la exhibición, o simplemente se sientan en un lugar que privilegie una visión que abarca distintas pantallas a la vez. De cualquier modo, es prácticamente imposible verlas todas simultáneamente, y la disposición de las pantallas supone un trabajo de selección del espectador, y por tanto, supone que hay espacios de lo visible que se quedan fuera de la percepción. El sonido envolvente, que también se desplaza espacialmente, de izquierda a derecha, o en círculo, es entonces el recurso que le da continuidad espacio-temporal a una percepción que es de por sí fragmentaria.

Las nueve pantallas nos muestran distintos niveles de la historia, formatos de imágenes, y escalas de planos diferentes. Así, lo que ocurre es un montaje cinematográfico espacial, más que temporal, donde la mirada del espectador se sitúa al mismo tiempo en el mundo narrativo y en el espacio vivencial del museo, espacio que, como Dalle Vache sugiere, es ambulatorio y fomenta una mezcla de “distracción y concentración”. El mundo narrativo de la instalación oscila entre esos dos impulsos, y la espectacularidad de las imágenes conduce a una contemplación estetizante al mismo tiempo que el susurro del poema y el sonido de las olas nos adormece.

Isaac Julien, Mazu, Turning (Ten Thousand Waves), 2010, fotografía Endura Ultra, 80 x 60,3 cm Cortesía del artista y Victoria Miro Gallery, Londres
Isaac Julien, Mazu, Turning (Ten Thousand Waves), 2010, fotografía Endura Ultra, 80 x 60,3 cm Cortesía del artista y Victoria Miro Gallery, Londres

Con respecto a la perspectiva postcolonial, hay que decir que en Ten Thousand Waves se cruzan tres historias que unen el pasado de China con su presente. La primera se inspira en la tragedia de la bahía de Morecambe, donde veintitrés trabajadores, inmigrantes chinos, se ahogaron cuando recogían moluscos en la costa de Inglaterra en el 2004. La segunda proviene de una antigua fábula china, la fábula de la Isla Yishan, donde la diosa Mazu (interpretada por Maggie Cheung) salva a un grupo de pescadores en el mar (lo que funciona como una alegoría de la tragedia de Morecambe). La tercera es una suerte de remake del clásico silente del cine chino, La diosa (1934), que retrata la vida de una mujer que se convierte en prostituta para alimentar a su hijo.

La tragedia de los inmigrantes es el origen de este trabajo, y constituye su centro moral y narrativo. De esta manera, en Ten Thousand Waves se reflexiona explícitamente sobre los desplazamientos humanos entre distintos continentes, y sobre las razones que los motivan en nuestra era globalizada. Algunos de los versos escritos por el poeta Wang Ping especialmente para este proyecto, nos dicen:

Tossed on the Communist road
We chose Capitalism through great perils
All we want is a life like others
TVs, cars, a house bigger than our neighbors’
Now the tide is rising to our necks
Ice forming in our throats
No moon shining on our path
No exit from the wrath of the North Wales Sea

Esta meditación sobre las migraciones humanas a escala global, sin embargo, está anclada en la especificidad de la experiencia china (un escape del comunismo, o del capitalismo de estado, hacia el corazón del neoliberalismo), en una exploración artística que es también autobiográfica, y en las particulares condiciones de producción de esta instalación, donde confluyen talentos y artistas de distintos rincones del mundo. El trabajo de Julien, fruto de cuatro años, es el resultado de su diálogo intercultural con el poeta Wang, con la tradición clásica del cine chino a través de La Diosa, con la música de Jah Wobble y Maria de Alvear, con el artista Yang Fudong. Julien no rehúye de las tensiones entre lo local y lo global, o entre su mirada de outsider y la mirada “autóctona” de los lugares en los que trabaja. Como él mismo ha dicho, “no uso la palabra etnografía porque estoy al tanto de que el mundo del arte ya ha descubierto el cine documental, y esperaría que mi trabajo sea demasiado estilizado para que se lo vea como tal”.

Por lo demás, Ten Thousand Waves es de alguna manera un proyecto hermano de Western Union: Small Boats (2007), donde Julien ya se aproximaba al fenómeno de los inmigrantes potenciales que salían de África hacia Europa en barcos artesanales y peligrosos, en búsqueda de una vida mejor. De hecho, el título original para este proyecto era Better Life, la misma vida mejor que los padres de Julien buscaron cuando emigraron del Caribe a Inglaterra -la misma vida mejor que está en el centro de su trabajo en los años incipientes del Black British Cinema, donde se interrogaba qué constituía la identidad caribeña y británica en la población negra de Inglaterra.

Isaac Julien, Hotel (Ten Thousand Waves), 2010, fotografía Endura Ultra, 180 x 240 cm Cortesía del artista, Metro Pictures, Nueva York, y Victoria Miro Gallery, Londres
Isaac Julien, Hotel (Ten Thousand Waves), 2010, fotografía Endura Ultra, 180 x 240 cm Cortesía del artista, Metro Pictures, Nueva York, y Victoria Miro Gallery, Londres

En Ten Thousand Waves no hay esencialismo ni identidades nacionales, sino una actualización del proceso de creolización, tanto en las historias que vemos en la instalación como en los modos de producción que la hacen posible. Las relaciones imprevisibles que van más allá del mestizaje y que dan forma a los contactos culturales creolizados, al decir de Glissant, operan también en la noción Benjaminiana de la historia y que en Ten Thousand Waves aparece en la figura de la diosa Mazu que vuela sobre los bosques y guía a los pescadores. Es una imagen que “sutura”, nos dice Julien, las distintas miradas, puntos de vista, y materiales aparentemente incongruentes: el registro policial de la tragedia, olas digitalmente manipuladas, imágenes de archivo capturadas en la bahía, y la suntuosidad del paisaje donde se desplaza Mazu. Como el “ángel de la historia”, es, también, la imagen que sutura acontecimientos particulares y los inscribe en una historia de la humanidad más amplia. Una imagen sobre el pasado escrita y leída con los materiales del presente. Dice el famoso texto de Benjamin:

Bien le gustaría detenerse, despertar a los muertos y recomponer lo destrozado. Pero, soplando desde el Paraíso, una tempestad se enreda en sus alas, y es tan fuerte que el ángel no puede cerrarlas. Esta tempestad lo empuja incontenible hacia el futuro, al cual vuelve la espalda mientras el cúmulo de ruinas ante él va creciendo hasta el cielo.