FKA twigs

mary magdalene

FKA twigs mary magdalene

source:nytimescom
‘Mary Magdalene’: How FKA twigs Made Her ‘Most Complex Song Ever’
It took months for the singer, songwriter and dancer FKA twigs to perfect the title track for her critically acclaimed new album. See how she got it right in the latest episode of Diary of a Song.

The singer, songwriter and producer FKA twigs, born Tahliah Debrett Barnett, is a polymath who keeps adding to her arsenal.

At 31, she has complicated her reputation as a whispery singer of sparse, deconstructed R&B songs by blowing out not only her sound but her broader creative practice: She has trained as a dancer in various underground styles (vogueing, krumping, pole work), while also working as an actor, director and even a student of wushu, a form of Chinese martial arts that can resemble sword fighting. Crucially, FKA twigs, known to collaborators for her dedication to practice and discipline, then brings all she’s learned back to her music and live performances.

The result, most recently, is “Magdalene,” her second full-length album, which was released last month and became one of the most critically acclaimed releases of the year. “In the voluptuously disorienting music she has been releasing since 2012, love has been pleasure and pain, sacrifice and self-realization, strife and comfort, public performance and private revelation,” wrote Jon Pareles in The New York Times. “Sounds materialize to destabilize the pulse, upend the harmony or just add disruptive noise; gaping silences open up, suddenly isolating her voice in midair.”

The album was named for the biblical figure Mary Magdalene, in whom FKA twigs found inspiration after undergoing surgery to remove six fibroid tumors from her uterus in late 2017. In the latest Diary of a Song episode, the singer and her fellow producers break down the intricate processes that led to writing and recording “Mary Magdalene,” the title track and centerpiece of the album. The song came together over many months in three phases, from initial bedroom sessions with the pop producers Benny Blanco and Cashmere Cat, to work in a haunted house with the British electronic producer Koreless, and finally, at the storied Electric Lady Studios in New York with the experimental composer Nicolas Jaar (and possibly with Prince’s purple spirit).

FKA twigs, who is credited along with Noah Goldstein as the executive producer of the “Magdalene” album, called the title track “the most complex song I’ve ever made.” Watch the video above to see how she did it.

“Diary of a Song” provides an up-close, behind-the-scenes look at how pop music is made today, using archival material — voice memos, demo versions, text messages, emails, interviews and more — to tell the story behind the track. Subscribe to our YouTube channel.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:pitchforkcom
rom her first video, 2012’s mesmerizing “Hide,” the singular focus of her vision was apparent, a holistic project that rendered FKA twigs’ operatic approach to club beats inextricable from her astounding art direction. In the seven years since, she has made her art into a kind of theatrical multimedia experience, crafting elaborate shows and videos that intertwine and smudge the lines of classicism and the avant-garde. She is astonishing, ambitious, and seemingly good at everything, singing over her own ticker-tape beats, self-directing wildly conceptual videos, and ravenously hoovering up dance disciplines (apparently up to and including Chinese sword fighting) until she masters them.

Yet in spite of twigs’ distinctive soprano (spectral and often papery) and her experimental production (stunning and often bellicose), her music has resonated best as a part of a whole, a piece that propels her full-blown artistry but does not totally comprise it. Chalk this up to twigs’ innovation in the Eyeballs Epoch, but even 2015’s incredible M3LL155X EP—a brooding and serrated read on genres like industrial, ballroom house, and triple-time rap—centered adventurousness over melody. It let the fullness of her art bring the beats along with it—weird bangers meant to challenge patrons of the most interesting nightclubs—but was probably best experienced while watching French artist and polymath Michèle Lamy rendered as a deep-sea anglerfish. The gesamtkunstwerk of twigs sometimes overshadowed the music itself, in part because so much of twigs’ presence is her world-class athleticism as a dancer. She imbues voguing and lyrical ballet with such grace and sensuality that the emotion of her music emanates directly from her body.

MAGDALENE, then, is a fucking revelation. FKA twigs’ first album in four years, and her best work by far, is as introspective as anything she’s written, but more obviously centers her voice as a conduit for plain emotion. Written during a publicly scrutinized relationship with a famously reluctant vampire, as well as a more private recovery from the removal of fibroids from her uterus, she has said she found solace and inspiration in the story of Mary Magdalene, among the New Testament’s most reviled and misunderstood character, whose complexities were rewritten by centuries of chauvinist churchmen into a fallen-woman side note in Jesus’ story. By locating herself in Magdalene’s lineage, twigs, a Catholic school alumnus, explores the ways deeply conservative expectations trammel women; in doing so, she locates a version of herself within these ancient and oppressive archetypes, upending and transcending them through the power of her songwriting and the sheer magnetic pull of her presence.

“thousand eyes” opens MAGDALENE with twigs singing in the austere polyphony of Medieval church music, a meditation on the moment before a permanent departure (“If I walk out the door it starts our last goodbye”) that, with repetition, reveals itself as a hymn. It’s a prologue for an album whose songs are produced like narratives, with a beginning, climax, and denouement. She grapples with survival—psychic and physical survival—the way a woman who lives to move might respond to being laid out by tumors on an organ that facilitates birth. She is furious in parts, attacking tracks like the sweet “home with you” and snarling standout “fallen alien” with virility and self-preservation. Even if shit went south, she refuses to saddle herself with the burden: “I’m a fallen alien, I never thought that you would be the one to tie me down,” she seethes. “But you did in this age of Satan/I’m searching for a light to take me home and guide me out.”

MAGDALENE is visceral and direct, but despite featuring a trunk-thumping Future collaboration (“holy terrain”), this is not a play to make pop music in the charts-humping sense. It’s a document of twigs’ marked achievements in songwriting and musicality as she elucidates her melodies without sacrificing her viewpoint. “sad day,” one of MAGDALENE’s most astonishing tracks, finds twigs properly genuflecting at the altar of Kate Bush, clearly having learned from her ability to translate inner sanctum into cinematic, Shelleyan alt-pop. The production by twigs, Nicolas Jaar, Skrillex, and benny blanco is utterly sublime: Skittering toms build onto an oscillating space-synth, the beats a proscenium for twigs’ voice and, especially, her lover’s desperation. Even if “sad day” doesn’t tell an explicit narrative in its lyrics, its production and twigs’ delivery tell an emotional one, that of the last desperate grasps at love in a power imbalance; we’re at the center where the story turns, teetering towards its inevitable end.

That the album stands alone is not to say the totality of her vision is truncated; twigs has already released three videos to accompany its nine songs. The first, “cellophane,” set the tone for the project, showcasing her pole-dancing skills to a dissonantly sorrowful ballad. (That she apparently finds it funny is a testament to her character—serious artists who can’t laugh at themselves are the worst.) The armchair interpretation of “cellophane” is as a meditation on the virulent racism that disgusting British tabloids and the worst of Twilight stans lobbed at twigs during her relationship with Robert Pattinson, but it’s equally a mournful reflection on the insecurities that dog any inequitable relationship. The imagery twigs has associated with “cellophane”—pole dancing, a feat of physical strength set perpendicular to the emotional strength she sings about lacking—calls up the idea of performing for others’ pleasure. It’s a sad solo dance by someone both fully present in herself and aware that she’s toeing the line between agency and subjugation. As the final track on this deeply thought, deeply felt album, “cellophane” acts as a rejoinder to “thousand eyes”—how sickening it must be, a woman artist constantly watched by bigoted tabloids interested in tearing you down from the man you love, how they did Mary M. and Jesus—and underscores the sorrow woven through MAGDALENE. The fact that sorrow spurred a musical growth this formidable, though, is evidence enough that twigs will always find her way back home.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:muzokoru
Мария Магдалина — пятый трек с одноименного альбома FKA Twigs. Как не трудно догадаться, песня Mary Magdalene полностью посвящена библейскому персонажу Марии Магдалине, чье имя, помимо прочего, послужило названием для всего альбома певицы.

Мария Магдалина была близкой последовательницей Христа, которая долго путешествовала с Иисусом и присутствовала рядом с ним в горе и радости. Из-за неправильного толкования текстов Папой Григорием I в 581 году, долгое время Марию Магдалину считали “падшей женщиной” что нашло отражение в Евангелии от Луки 7:36. Сейчас считается, что это неправильное толкование, которое было пересмотрено Папой Павлом VI в 1969 году. Однако представление о Марии как проститутке, по-прежнему сохраняется в поп-культуре.

FKA Twigs пытается внести свой скромный вклад в попытки разобрать и понять непростую жизнь этой выдающейся женщины.

Давайте перейдем к тексту и переводу на русский язык песни Mary Magdalene
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:magazinehdcom
Do poder à solidão, da necessidade à súplica, MAGDALENE, de FKA twigs, oferece um retrato do humano e do feminino onde pulsam as tensões que definem o agora.

Muito se tem dito sobre a omnipresença da figura de Maria Madalena no segundo álbum de Tahliah Debrett Barnett. Aspecto facilmente exagerado, que tende a esquecer o quanto de MAGDALENE é a digestão dolorosa dos momentos difíceis atravessados por FKA twigs desde que, em 2014, editou o seu LP1, um dos álbuns mais marcantes da cultura musical desta década prestes a terminar. Nos cinco anos que entretanto passaram, duas relações infrutíferas mas mediáticas com os actores Robert Pattinson e Shia LaBeouf, meses de dores abdominais até à extracção de vários tumores no útero, a necessidade de trabalhar como bailarina num projecto de Spike Lee apenas quatro semanas depois da cirurgia, a solidão do desconhecido nas cidades americanas de Nova Iorque e Los Angeles onde parte do novo disco foi composto e gravado, tudo se acumulou para fazer destes anos um tempo de sofrimento e reflexão pessoal e de MAGDALENE o seu resultado (i-D). Ainda assim, FKA twigs confessou a sua obsessão pela figura desta santa dos primeiros tempos do cristianismo, desde a infância na St Edward’s School, uma escola privada católica de Cheltenham, reconhecendo o quanto lhe serviu de inspiração, fio condutor e fonte de imagens para a composição do álbum e da arte visual que o envolve.

Neste período conturbado da vida, a artista britânica encontrou consolo na personagem neo-testamentária que a tradição foi modelando e corrigindo historicamente. Segundo o comunicado de imprensa que acompanhou a partilha do single “Holy Terrain”, FKA twigs nunca pensou que “o desgosto pudesse ser tão avassalador”, tendo encontrado compaixão na altura de maior desaire, confusão e fractura: “Parei de me julgar a mim própria e, nesse momento, descobri a esperança em ‘Madalena’. Estar-lhe-ei sempre grata.” Para sermos precisos, o que serviu de lenitivo a Tahliah Barnett foi a sua interpretação particular desta figura bíblica. Para FKA twigs, a descrição de Maria Madalena como a pecadora que descobre o seu incomensurável valor ao ser olhada por Jesus, tão dependente deste homem divino para perceber e ser quem é, não passa de um arquétipo paternalista. Em MAGDALENE, a figura da santa metamorfoseia-se num outro arquétipo retirado da cultura romântica e decadentista do século XIX, em gestação desde a publicação do Paradise Lost, de John Milton. No álbum, é a cortesã, a mulher demoníaca, o anjo (ou alienígena) caído, mesclado ainda da pureza da história original, quem canta, suplica, oferece-se, enfurece-se, vinga-se, gaba-se, reflecte, chora e geme até ao final, quando perplexa, atónita e “overwhelmed” cai dos píncaros da sua tentativa, envolta em celofane.

MAGDALENE funda-se assim num revisionismo pós-moderno do passado e do seu legado de imagens culturais, na paródia que, de há quarenta anos para cá, vem reconfigurando o modo como nos vemos a nós próprios e às relações que estabelecemos uns com os outros. A dimensão do “poder”, aqui evocada, percorre todo o álbum, configurando uma certa imagem do feminino e uma dada concepção do amor. No tema de abertura, o tom de ameaça, presente tanto no aviso insistente de “If I walk out the door” quanto na vigilância dos mil olhos prontos a acordar, contrasta com os sentimentos de devoção e misericórdia habitualmente associados à música sacra medieval e renascentista, de que “thousand eyes” é uma engenhosa reconstrução art-pop, na sua melodia de canto gregoriano, na subtil polifonia a acenar ao de leve ao estilo de Allegri e Palestrina, na reverberação tão sugestiva do eco dos grandes mosteiros.

Longe contudo do “Kyrie” da Missae Papae Marcelli, de Palestrina, ou do Miserere, de Allegri, não é com o pedido de perdão que tudo começa e acaba em MAGDALENE, mas com um amor que, na raiz, esconde sempre uma luta de poder: “Now you hold me close so tender/ When you fall asleep I’ll kick you down/ By the way you fell I know you/ Now you’re on your knees”. Num amor assim não há gratuidade, toda a rendição e oferta de si é sob condição (“I die for you on my terms”) e mais cedo ou mais tarde exigimos do outro tudo aquilo que lhe demos: “Didn’t I do it for you?/ Why don’t I do it for you?/ Why won’t you do it for me/ When all I do is for you?” Mesmo aquela necessidade que seria uma dependência converte-se aqui numa forma de poder, com o carente a prender a si o potente por meio dos laços de responsabilidade e compromisso. Contrariamente à Fénix que renasce das cinzas, convertida em símbolo do que reconquista a vida dando-se até à morte, na matemática terrena de MAGDALENE tudo o que se dá ao outro esvazia o eu ao invés de o realizar, num espectáculo de predação: “How come the more you have, the more that people want from you?/ The more you burn away, the more the people earn from you/ The more you pull away, the more that they depend on you.” Numa entrevista à Genius, FKA twigs explicou que “Home With You” era sobre “aquela batalha de querer estar ali disponível para alguém, mas lutar também, ao mesmo tempo, por estar ali disponível para si próprio”. Esta “creature of desire” que é a Maria Madalena de FKA twigs “must put herself first”.

E, no entanto, sem simplificar, com aquela sensibilidade que, no universo da música pop, a faz contestar os papéis tradicionais atribuídos à mulher com uma elegância e contenção que falta a muitas outras, FKA twigs permite mais ou menos conscientemente que, por inúmeros poros, irrompam os limites, os contrastes e as aporias deste ponto de partida. Como em Citizen Kane, de Orson Welles, também aqui o poder convive e parece findar inevitavelmente na solidão. “Lonely is my hoping”, rumina Tahliah durante o seu “daybed” de depressão, inércia e pírrico prazer. Em última instância, é impossível escamotear a perda e a falta: “And for the lovers who found a mirrored heart/ They just remind me I’m without you”. E não estará a insegurança na origem da tentativa de se afirmar, não terá o poder a sua raiz no temor? “Will you still be there for me, once I’m yours to obtain?/ Once my fruits are for taking and you flow through my veins?/ Do you still think I’m beautiful, when my tears fall like rain?/ My love is so bountiful for a man who is true to me”. Ou no ressentimento, acontecido o que se temia? “Did you want me all?/ No, not for life/ Did you truly see me?/ No, not this time/ Were you ever sure?/ No, no, no, not with me”. E assim assoma, neste álbum sobre o empoderamento, toda a dúvida e incerteza sobre o outro, sempre livre de se ir embora, impossível de conquistar, terminando numa súplica com que se confessa a própria dependência: “When you’re gone, I have no one to tell/ And I just want to feel you’re there”.

Paradoxalmente, o modo de produção de MAGDALENE testemunha uma FKA twigs bem segura de si, da voz, da personalidade, do estilo. Menos preocupada em cinzelar uma musicalidade que a distinga de todos, são vários os caminhos que traça de encontro com o alheio. A sonoridade aparenta ser menos experimental e idiossincrática do que em LP1, distanciando-se das suas origens art-pop, trip hop e electrónica vanguardista em direcção a um R&B e até hip-hop mais palatáveis e convencionais. Mas esta aparente cedência resulta, na realidade, de um domínio da própria arte que permite abrir o espaço a outros, num projecto permeado de colaborações, sem perder nada do carisma ou coerência. O álbum soa tão coeso, transpirando tanto a presença de FKA twigs a cada instante, que se torna difícil imaginar a quantidade de produtores que participaram na gravação de MAGDALENE. Para além de Noah Goldstein, com quem FKA twigs partilhou os deveres da produção executiva, e Nicolas Jaar, deram também o seu contributo Koreless, Daniel Lopatin, Skrillex, Cashmere Cat, Benny Blanco e Michael Uzowuru, entre outros. Em “Holy Terrain”, FKA twigs reparte o terreno com Future, revelando aquele à vontade e paridade no embate que vêm só com a maturidade. O talento melódico, já perceptível em canções como “Two Weeks” ou “Closer”, floresce agora plenamente. As melodias pop/R&B mais expansivas e cantáveis, menos fragmentárias e artificiosas do que em LP1, permitem a FKA twigs soltar a voz, ao estilo de Kate Bush ou Tori Amos, e modelá-la teatralmente em função dos sentimentos da sua personagem, da sua ‘Madalena’, sem perder nada do bom gosto e enigma que sempre caracterizaram o seu trabalho. A esfinge de canto críptico de LP1, por detrás da qual se escondia a jovem tímida, desapareceu, revelando um rosto flexível de mulher, capaz de transparecer a miríade de sentimentos que assolam a alma e vibram em cada palavra.

Interessa pouco discutir a legitimidade ou veracidade da reconstrução que FKA twigs faz da personagem de Maria Madalena. Não foi a primeira nem será a última pessoa a fazê-lo, sinal do perene fascínio que esta figura bíblica exerce sobre a humanidade. Interessa bem mais o confronto com o arquétipo que resulta desta metamorfose. É ao retrato do feminino proposto por FKA twigs em MAGDALENE que cabe ou não ser verdadeiro, profícuo, feliz. Uma simplificação, mas não simplista, a pintura é complexa, atravessada de tensões que a autora deixa viver, sem as procurar resolver ou eliminar, com a mesma angústia e quieta perplexidade com que as experiencia. Mas porque nos pouparia ela o trabalho que cabe a todos? “In this age of Satan/ I’m searching for a light to take me home and guide me out”. Nestes tempos de confusão, cada um deverá fazer a sua estrada. FKA twigs dá-nos um conselho: “Take a chance on all the things you can’t see/ Make a wish on all that lives within thee”. Sinto-me inclinada a concordar. Só daqui poderemos retirar uma história pessoal, irredutível a quaisquer arquétipos, sempre demasiado foscos, demasiado largos ou estreitos para espelhar o rosto único que nos pertence e abarcar a vida que nos espera.