ANN HAMILTON

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앤 해밀턴

Filament

ANN HAMILTON

source: greenneonlightwordpress

Ann Hamilton’s Filament 11 (1996). This piece consisted of a high curtained structure which circulated the material around in one space. It stopped every 15 seconds or so, enough time for one or two people to enter into the spinning vortex of linen material. Whilst standing inside the whirlwind of fabric I felt as though I myself were almost flying or being transported to another dimension or something (ok, this description might be slightly exaggerated, but I have quite an ambitious imagination!) Either way, I fully enjoyed the experience of the piece immensely.
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source: annhamiltonstudio
Ann Hamilton is a visual artist internationally recognized for the sensory surrounds of her large-scale multi-media installations. Using time as process and material, her methods of making serve as an invocation of place, of collective voice, of communities past and of labor present. Noted for a dense accumulation of materials, her ephemeral environments create immersive experiences that poetically respond to the architectural presence and social history of their sites. Whether inhabiting a building four stories high or confined to the surface of a thimble, the genesis of Hamilton’s art extends outwards from the primary projections of the hand and mouth. Her attention to the uttering of a sound or the shaping of a word with the hand places language and text at the tactile and metaphoric center of her installations. To enter their liminality is to be drawn equally into the sensory and linguistic capacities of comprehension that construct our faculties of memory, reason and imagination.

In a time when successive generations of technology amplify human presence at distances for greater than the reach of the hand, what becomes the place and form of making at the scale and pace of the individual body? How does making participate in the recuperation and recognition of embodied knowledge? What are the places and forms for live, tactile, visceral, face-to-face experiences in a media saturated world? These concerns have animated the site responsive installations that have formed the bulk of Hamilton’s practice over the last 20 years. But where the relations of cloth, sound, touch, motion and human gesture once gave way to dense materiality, Hamilton’s work now focuses on the less material acts of reading, speaking and listening. The influence of collaborative processes in ever more complex architectures has shifted her forms of making, wherein the movement of the viewer in time and in space now becomes a central figure of the work.

Born in Lima, Ohio, in 1956, Ann Hamilton received a BFA in textile design from the University of Kansas in 1979 and an MFA in sculpture from the Yale School of Art in 1985. From 1985 to 1991, she taught on the faculty of the University of California at Santa Barbara. Hamilton has served on the faculty of The Ohio State University since 2001, where she is a Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Art.

Among her many honors, Hamilton has been the recipient of the Heinz Award, MacArthur Fellowship, United States Artists Fellowship, NEA Visual Arts Fellowship, Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award, Skowhegan Medal for Sculpture, and the Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. She represented the United States in the 1991 Sao Paulo Bienal, the 1999 Venice Biennale, and has exhibited extensively around the world. Her major commissions include projects for Waterfront Seattle (upcoming); Park Avenue Armory (2013); The Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts, St. Louis (2010); The Guggenheim Museum, New York (2009); Contemporary Art Museum, Kumamoto, Japan (2006); La Maison Rouge Fondation de Antoine Galbert, Paris, France (2005); Historiska Museet, Stockholm, Sweden (2004); MASS MoCA, North Adams, Massachusetts (2003); The Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C. (2003, 1991); The Wanas Foundation, Knislinge, Sweden (2002); Akira Ikeda Gallery, Taura, Japan (2001); The Musee d’art Contemporain, Lyon, France (1997); The Stedelijk Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, The Netherlands (1996); The Art Institute of Chicago (1995); The Museum of Modern Art, New York (1994); The Tate Gallery, Liverpool (1994); Dia Center for the Arts, New York (1993); The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (1988).
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source: criticalresponsewikispaces
Introduction:
In 2003-2004 Ann Hamilton created the installation piece, Corpus at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MassMOCA). The installation was located in a room three stories high with two tiers of windows containing 3,380 panes of glass. It was originally a mill chamber used from 1874 to 1938 by the Arnold Print Works as dyeing rooms for cotton that would be used for upholstery and curtains.
As many as 45 people worked on Corpus; covering the panes of glass with cloth spent three weeks. Forty machines dropped 8×11” pieces of onionskin paper from the ceiling. Hamilton chose the paper by sucking samples up to her mouth and then releasing them until she discovered the weight and texture she desired. Twenty-four speakers moved up and down in 15-minute cycles transmitting voices that read text written by Hamilton.
Learning objectives:
Students will create an aesthetically interesting multimedia installation, that demonstrates consideration of place, material choices and visual impact on the viewer.
Students will manipulate an environment in order to explore the notions of the sublime, ethereal and spiritual.
Students will use relevant materials as media and metaphor to translate their thoughts about the etherial and spiritual to the viewer. Students will take into consideration the physical qualities and history of the place they are installing in.
Students will construct two installations, first in a group setting in class, then individually in a space of their choosing.
The artist and her work:
Ann Hamilton was born in 1956 in Lima, Ohio. She attended in University of Kansas and trained in textile design, then later received an MFA in sculpture from Yale University. In 1993, she won the MacArthur Fellowship, and was the only visual artist to do so in this year. She also represented the United States at the Venice Biennial She currently lives and works in Columbus, Ohio, teaching at the Ohio State University. Hamilton is an internationally recognized multimedia installation artist. She creates site responsive environments that generate an immersive experience for the viewer. Her installations respond to the architecture and social history of their sites, considering the ways sound, touch and motion interact with materials like cloth and paper in these environments.
Investigating the spiritual and sublime:
In what ways does Ann Hamilton “make visible the invisible” in her work? How does she use etherial qualities like sound, light and shadow in her installation? What affect do they have on the viewer? Does this artwork remind you of other of a place you’ve been in before? How is Hamilton’s instillation like a “sanctuary?” How does she incorporate the history of the place into her installation?
Questions for creating installations:
How will you make the most of your space?
How will you produce a work that is aesthetically interesting?
What practical considerations do you have to consider?
What objects will you need to construct? What materials do you have to work with? How will you select the materials to create your installation?
How will you separate your installation from the surrounding environment?
What kind of feeling do you want to convey to our audience? How will you use lighting, color and sound to convey a feeling?
Instructional activities:
Using table-top sized objects, flashlights, paper and cloth create a small-scale installation with your group. Consider how a person might interact with the environment you have created, and/or altered.
Art-making:
Think about the atmosphere and feelings Ann Hamilton works to generate in her installations and consider what you learned from the installation we did in class. Create an installation in a place you are familiar with, this must be a place you can access and make impermanent changes to. Use at least one physical manipulation and two sensory manipulations. Document your process in at least five images or three minute video. Document a participant interacting with your installation in some way (camera phone, digital camera, video, etc.) You will “present” your documentation to the class so it must be adequate enough to convey all the elements of your piece and impact on the viewer.
Assessment:
Student participated in the group installation in class.
Student documented their process and a viewer interacting with their installation.
Student used a least one physical manipulation and two sensory manipulations to create an installation with a strong aesthetic impact.
Student exhibited problem solving strategies with materials, and environment.
Installation is expressive and original.
Student incorporated at least one content theme Ann Hamilton explored in Corpus.
Student incorporated at least one technique Ann Hamilton used in Corpus.
Conclusion:
Many of Ann Hamilton’s installations transform space to generate a feeling of other worldliness. She manipulates materials in order to transform a space, taking into consideration the embedded meaning of the materials. In Corpus, she covered the windows of a giant, former mill room with pink silk–filling the space with rosy light. During the installation the floor became covered with millions of sheets of white onionskin paper that fluttered down from the ceiling at irregular intervals, like leaves. In addition, the low sound of voices was transmitted from moving speakers. The combination of these elements created an ethereal space–a place to be experienced by the senses. As Hamilton states about experiencing the work, “It’s not something to consume, but something you have to wait for.”
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source: arteseanpblogspot
Ann Hamilton (1956-) Nasceu em Lima, Ohaio. Graduou-se na University of Kansas, Kansas City. Yale School of Art, New haven, M.F.A. Bolsa do Memorial Guggenheim. Artista visual utilizando-se de grandes instalações multi-medias usando o tempo como processo e material. Recebeu o prêmio Confort Tiffany. É professora da Ohio State University. Participou das Bienais de Veneza e São Paulo.