Anne Holtrop

Trail House

Anne Holtrop Trail House

source: dezeen

Dutch architect Anne Holtrop has completed a pavilion in an overgrown field in Almere, Netherlands, with plans that follow existing trails and paths across the site.

Called Trail House, the structure begins as an extension of the paths and features the same curvature of the trails, getting wider at certain parts and dividing in other places.

Here’s some more information from the architect:

Trail House introduction
Trail House is a single house with a fragment of the existing paths (or trails) as the plan for the house. A house with the same curvature as a path, a house that curls, bends and split through the landscape. The plan, as an objet trouvé of a landscape element, has defined characteristics without being formed by its architectural function. A curvature, a dead end, a bifurcation, all are special spaces with its relations to the landscape.

‘We live in space, in these spaces, these towns, this countryside, these corridors, these parks. That seems obvious to us. Perhaps indeed it should be obvious. But it isn’t obvious, not just a matter of course [….] There’s nothing, for example, to stop us from imagining things that are neither towns nor countryside (nor suburbs), or Métro corridors that are at the same time public parks. Nor anything to forbid us imagining a Métro in the heart of the countryside.’

SITE2F7 is a largely vacant and as yet unplanned site in the centre of the city of Almere. Everything there is temporary. There are wild orchids, including the Southern Marsh Orchid which is listed in the Netherlands as an endangered plant species. There are countless grasses, herbs, flowers and willows. There are White and Yellow Sweet Clover; Black Medick; Bird’s-Foot, Hop and Lesser Hop Trefoil; and Red, White and Alsike Clover. There are artificial sand hills, some of them overgrown. There is a bridge over a ditch, made out of an old mattress with a wooden pallet on top of it. There is a small mowed football pitch with goalposts made of blue-painted tubular steel and two wooden benches with concrete bases. There is a field with sorrel growing up out of the grass, and in the background a rectangular block of houses whose small gardens extend to just one metre in front of the façades. There are two roads, a cycle path, a ditch and a railway alongside it, with an office block under construction behind them. There are paths across the site, worn down out of the vegetation, with sometimes very clear and sometimes barely visible branches, bends, forks, shifts and cut-offs. The paths intersect and link the elements of the vacant site. They turn it into a landscape. Path and site go hand in hand.

What if some of these paths formed a house? You are walking through the landscape among all the plants, grasses and other elements, and then suddenly, without any warning, the house begins as an extension of the path. Once inside, the space carries on with the same curvature as it had outside just a moment ago, and gradually widens. The walls, floor and roof invert the path, as though you’ve ended up in it. On the left an opening in the wall with a view of an open space, and on the right a bulge in the wall where the house divides into two separate parts – just like a path. One of the parts carries on, and on one sharp bend you come across the kitchen and on a following bend a table and chairs. You pass alternating short and long windows through which other parts of the house can be seen among the vegetation. Hanging in a tiny, narrow, winding space is a trail of vests, trousers, shirts, dresses, jackets and scarves leading towards the bed. Then the house continues on its way and finally stops at the bath, at the end of a long, curved space, and before you get there you first come across the washbasin, then the toilet and only then the bath with the view of the continuing path. From the bath, diagonally to the left, the other fork of the house can be seen.

This is the Trail House.

Extra information: Trail House is part of the exhibition Unknown Territories 2009 by Museum De Paviljoens in Almere
Architecture: Anne Holtrop, Amsterdam
Commissioned by: Museum De Paviljoens, Almere
Photos Trail House: Bas Princen, Rotterdam
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source: z33be

Anne Holtrop (1977) is a Dutch architect who lives and works in Amsterdam. He studied architecture at the Academy of Architecture in Amsterdam from 1999 to 2005. After graduation, Holtrop set up his own practice in Amsterdam. He is affiliated with various art and architecture academies and is editor of the journal for architecture, OASE. His work has already been exhibited many times both nationally and internationally.

In Mind the System, Find the Gap, ‘Trail House’ (2009) is presented.
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source: z33be

Anne Holtrop (1977) is een Nederlandse architect die woont en werkt in Amsterdam. Hij studeerde architectuur aan de Academie van Bouwkunst in Amsterdam van 1999 tot 2005. Na zijn afstuderen startte Holtrop een eigen praktijk in Amsterdam. Hij is verbonden aan verschillende kunst- en architectuuracademies en is redacteur van het architectuurtijdschrift OASE. Zijn werk werd reeds op verschillende plaatsen in binnen- en buitenland gepresenteerd.

In Mind the System, Find the Gap wordt ‘Trail House’ (2009) gepresenteerd.
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source: stockholmsarkitektforeningse

Anne Holtrop är arkitekt med bas i Amsterdam, där han leder Studio for Immediate Spaces vid Sandberg Instituut. Hans prisbelönta arbeten har bl a visats vid Venedigbiennalen 2012 och spänner mellan modeller, tillfälliga rum och byggnader. Bland projekten märks Museum Fort Vechten i Utrecht samt National Pavilion of the Kingdom of Bahrain i Milano, som båda är under byggnation.
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source: agendabe

Diplômé de l’Academie van Bouwkunst à Amsterdam en 2005, Anne Holtrop a fondé son bureau d’architecture la même année. En parallèle à sa carrière d’architecte, il a développé un travail artistique remarquable où l’architecture continue de jouer un rôle important. Il a été artiste en résidence à Tokyo en 2009, à Séoul en 2011 et à Copenhague en 2012. Il est également chargé de cours au Studio for Immediate Spaces du Sandberg Institute à Amsterdam et rédacteur pour Oase. Son œuvre comprend à la fois des maquettes d’architecture et des bâtiments construits, des œuvres d’art et des meubles comme ceux conçus pour Maniera à Bruxelles.
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source: aisouluo

Anne Holtrop 设计的‘Trail House’,在荷兰的Almere。房子在杂草之中,所以随着四季的变化,房子的景观也会有所不同。
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source: urbanismoru

Голландский архитектор Anne Holtrop, Amsterdam завершила разработку павильона, который расположен в городе Алмера (Голландия). Название проекта Trail House. Сооружение начинается как продолжение пути и повторяет кривизну трассы, в некоторых районах становясь все шире и разделяясь в нескольких местах. Это необычный дом, который может служить тропой или лабиринтом с тупиками. Архитектор пыталась максимально соединить дом с окружающим природным ландшафтом. Во время разработки проекта Anne Holtrop представляла, какое может быть метро в центре деревни. Природа территории, где построен дом очень яркая, есть много видов растений, в том числе уникальных, пешеходный мост, маленькие велосипедные дорожки. И среди этих живых элементов вырастает дом, который является их продолжением.