Christoph Sensen

Кристофа Сенсена

dead man float
CAVEman 3-D Virtual Patient Is a Holodeck For the Human Body

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source: igmaporu
Что происходит внутри тела человека после приема лекарственных препаратов? В Университете Калгари (University of Calgary) ученые могут, одев пару 3D-очков, рассмотреть все происходящие внутри человеческого тела процессы и ответить на этот вопрос. Это стало возможным благодаря созданию установки виртуальной реальности, названной CAVEman 3-D Virtual Patient, ценой 1.5 миллиона долларов, которая позволяет провести симуляцию и исследования метаболизма и других процессов в человеческом теле, вызванных приемом лекарственных препаратов.
Установка CAVEman 3-D Virtual Patient состоит из трех стереоскопических проекторов, установленных на полу и одного, установленного на потолке. Эти проекторы отображают человеческое тело, анимированное с помощью компьютера. Просматривая изображение через стереоскопические очки, исследователи могут наблюдать за кровообращением, за распространением лекарственных препаратов по человеческому телу и за результатами их воздействия.

Ученые под руководством биохимика Кристофа Сенсена (Christoph Sensen) собираются разработать целый ряд программ компьютерных симуляций, которые будут моделировать прогрессию некоторых болезней, таких как болезнь Альцгеймера, диабет, рак и других. Эти программы симуляций помогут врачам буквально «выискивать» необходимые лекарственные препараты и методы их введения для успешного преодоления заболевания.

«Вы можете буквально стоять внутри пациента» – говорит Кристоф Сенсен – «и видеть насколько велики масштабы заболевания, как необходимо на него воздействовать и к каким результатам это может привести».
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source: popsci
What happens when you pop a pill? Inside the University of Calgary’s $1.5-million virtual-reality room, scientists can don a pair of 3-D goggles and find out in high-definition detail. Biochemist Christoph Sensen and his colleagues have created a virtual human dubbed the CAVEman (for Automated Virtual Environment) that lets them monitor how a virtual body metabolizes medicine.

The virtual-reality rig at the University of Calgary visualizes aspirin’s journey through the body in 3-D. First stop: the stomach and intestines [red], where the drug is absorbed. Next up is the bloodstream [light green] and finally the kidneys [dark green], which flush by-products into the urine
In this image, three stereoscopic projectors mounted on the floor and one on the ceiling display a computer-animated body. Looking through the goggles, researchers can watch its bloodstream turn from white to red as aspirin travels through it. Sensen hopes to develop computer simulations that will model the progression of diseases like Alzheimer’s and diabetes and help scientists quite literally look for cures. Updated to reflect what’s happening inside a real patient, the technology could also help doctors diagnose and treat cancer. “You could stand inside your patient,” Sensen says, “and see how big the tumor is, how to treat it, and what the outcome will be.”
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source: e-flux
Is the internet dead? This is not a metaphorical question. It does not suggest that the internet is dysfunctional, useless or out of fashion. It asks what happened to the internet after it stopped being a possibility. The question is very literally whether it is dead, how it died and whether anyone killed it.

But how could anyone think it could be over? The internet is now more potent than ever. It has not only sparked but fully captured the imagination, attention and productivity of more people than at any other point before. Never before have more people been dependent on, embedded into, surveilled by, and exploited by the web. It seems overwhelming, bedazzling and without immediate alternative. The internet is probably not dead. It has rather gone all-out. Or more precisely: it is all over!

This implies a spatial dimension, but not as one might think. The internet is not everywhere. Even nowadays when networks seem to multiply exponentially, many people have no access to the internet or don’t use it at all. And yet, it is expanding in another direction. It has started moving offline. But how does this work?

Remember the Romanian uprising in 1989, when protesters invaded TV studios to make history? At that moment, images changed their function.2 Broadcasts from occupied TV studios became active catalysts of events—not records or documents. 3 Since then it has become clear that images are not objective or subjective renditions of a preexisting condition, or merely treacherous appearances. They are rather nodes of energy and matter that migrate across different supports,4 shaping and affecting people, landscapes, politics, and social systems. They acquired an uncanny ability to proliferate, transform, and activate. Around 1989, television images started walking through screens, right into reality.