GILLIAN WEARING

lilly cole

GILLIAN WEARING  lilly cole

source: independentcouk

Most photographers given the chance to create a portrait of the model Lily Cole, freed from the strictures of deploying her as a high fashion clothes horse, would search out ways to emphasise her unusual beauty. Cole’s thick red hair, huge eyes and tiny bud of a mouth place her somewhere between one of Charles Kingsley’s water babies and a Japanese Manga heroine, but the artist and Turner Prize-winner Gillian Wearing chose to hide Cole’s china doll-delicate features behind a mask. “I always thought she had the ideal face for a mask,” explains Wearing. “She is quite doll-like, and you think of a mask as being perfect, like a doll is.”

After taking the cast of Cole’s face and dressing the model in a Victorian lace shirt for the photo shoot, Wearing damaged the mask, sullying Cole’s perfectly smooth, freckled alabaster skin and exposing her fragility. “It’s quite touching,” she says of the finished work, “but also quite frightening.”

Wearing describes Cole as “very intelligent and very quick”. The pair met several times to make the portrait, to discuss the idea and to take several casts of Cole’s face. The photographs themselves took a whole day and several costume changes, but being a professional, Cole executed her part with ease – a far cry from the subjects of Wearing’s 2000 film Drunk, a group of alcoholics whom she welcomed into her studio and filmed over a period of time, recording how they lost their inhibitions.

Like Cole, Wearing is doll-like, but her frame is tiny in comparison to the tall model. On the evening we meet it is hidden in a white padded jacket with an enormous fur-trimmed hood. She is dwarfed by the high ceilings of her east London studio, all clean white, chrome and concrete lines and free from clutter of any type. Apart from the kettle, the only sign someone even works here is the neatly stacked bookshelf lining one wall and a row of Apple Macs under a long low window. Wearing has a history with masks and has worn them herself on numerous occasions. She first cast her own face in 2000 and in 2003 she transformed herself into different members of her own family for a series called Album. Last year she disguised herself as the American photographer Diane Arbus, one of her greatest inspirations. “Wearing masks gives you a sense of liberation,” she explains. “You can be much more playful behind them.”

Wearing becomes most animated when discussing the one Arbus print she owns, a gift from her gallerist Maureen Paley. “She’s an amazing photographer with brilliant ideas,” she says. By creating this Lily Cole edition, she is enabling her fans to own a piece of her work for a few hundred pounds (Wearing’s one-off pieces usually sell for £10,000-£50,000), and making her art available to a wider audience.

Masks allow for the subversion of conventional expectations and assumptions. This is a particular concern of Wearing’s, borne out by the early-Nineties work which made her name in the art world – Signs That Say What You Want Them To Say and Not Signs That Say What Someone Else Wants You To Say – in which she photographed members of the public holding up cardboard signs admitting something a camera alone cannot pick up. “I’m desperate,” says one, owned by the Tate. “I have been certified as mildly insane!”reads another.

The excruciating honesty of the photographs makes anyone reading the sign feel an immediate intimacy with the subject. A decade ago, when Wearing’s work first became widely known following the Turner Prize, she complained about a Volkswagen commercial which had clearly copied her idea – but it has since taken on a life of its own online which she cannot control. “It was one of those instant ideas that a lot of people found they were captivated by,” she says. “It’s just one of those things that is obviously very appealing, but I just thought someone could have rung up and asked in the first place.” The impact of this breathtakingly simple series of photographs remains powerful 15 years on – evidenced most recently in a website set up by Icelanders in protest at Gordon Brown, who had invoked anti-terror laws to freeze the assets of an Icelandic bank and ensure British savers did not lose their £4bn deposits. “Gordon Brown We Are Not Terrorists,” says one, held up by a father and his two sons, all wearing football shirts.

The public has not always been so quick to click with her ideas, though. When she won the Turner Prize in 1997 with her video work 60 Minutes Silence, a film of 26 police officers trying to keep still for the camera for an hour (the work looked like a photograph at first glance), the media debate about the “value” of conceptual contemporary art was in full flow. “In those days the tabloid attention towards the Turner Prize was huge,” she remembers. “It was all about creating headlines to get everybody’s backs up about contemporary art.” But she isn’t bitter; in fact she realises that the exposure changed our perception of art, predominantly for the better.

Wearing had studied art at Goldsmiths College in the late Eighties – just like Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Sarah Lucas, Rachel Whiteread and many others who later became successful artists – but she was not part of Charles Saatchi’s original Young British Artists shows, which pushed this generation into the public eye. “The more the public became intrigued by the art, the more they became used to it. I don’t think artists themselves really change over the centuries, and the people described as YBAs did disparate work, there was no movement. But something changed in the make-up of art in this country.”

Tate Modern itself is proof of how quickly attitudes can change. When Wearing won the Turner Prize, the former power station on the South Bank was still an empty shell. Now almost nine years old, it is considered one of Britain’s establishment art destinations, and a residential and commercial community has sprung up around it. Wearing says she didn’t hang out with Hirst, Emin, Lucas et al at Goldsmiths, not even Michael Landy, the artist best known for throwing away all of his belongings, and her partner for 12 years. She didn’t begin experimenting with the photographic and filmic work which became her focus until after she had left college, and at first suspected it might lead her towards a career in television.
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source: tanyabonakdargallery
Throughout the past two decades, Gillian Wearing’s films, photographs and sculptures have investigated public personas and private lives. Since the beginning of her career, the artist has drawn from techniques of theater, reality television and fly-on-the-wall documentary-making to construct narratives that explore personal fantasies and confessions, individual traumas, cultural histories, and the role of the media. Anonymity through elaborate masks, costumes and role-play has remained a critical part of Wearing’s practice and influential investigation of the ways in which individuals present themselves to others when the self is temporarily concealed.
Born in 1963 in Birmingham, Wearing present lives and works in London. She received a bachelor of technology degree in art & design from London’s Chelsea School of Art in 1987 and a BFA from Goldsmiths’ College, University of London in 1990. An important member of the Young British Artists, Wearing was awarded the Turner Prize in 1997.
In 2012, Whitechapel Art Gallery in London presented a major retrospective of the artist’s work, which traveled to K20 Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen in Düsseldorf, and to Pinakothek der Moderne’s Museum Brandhorst in Munich in 2013. Other important solo presentations include Self Made at the 54th BFI London Film Festival (2010), Confessions: Portraits, Videos at Musée Rodin in Paris (2009), Living Proof at ACCA, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art in Melbourne (2006), Snapshot at Bloomberg Space in London (2005), Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma in Helsinki, Finland (2004), and Mass Observation, which opened at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago in 2002 and traveled to the Institute of Contemporary Art at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and to Musée d’Art Contemporain de Montréal in Canada in 2003.
Her work has also been shown at the Museum of Modern Art & MoMA PS1 in New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre in London, Kunsthaus Zurich in Switzerland, National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, UCLA Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, New Museum in New York, George Eastman House, International Museum of Photography and Film in Rochester, NY, and at the Hessel Museum at Bard College in New York.
Her photographs and films are represented in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Tate Britain, Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, NY, Contemporary Art Society in London, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC. Guggenheim Museum in New York, Irish Museum of Modern Art in Dublin, Kunsthaus Zürich, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis.
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source: mujdemetintumblr
Gillian Wearing, estetik, duygusal ve ahlaki değerlere karşı olan toplumsal yaklaşımları inceleyişiyle, sergisine gidenleri binbir türlü yargıya sürükleyebiliyor. Süregelen kavramsal tartışmalara eğildiğinin farkında, o sadece benliklerimiz hakkında ne düşündüğümüzü ve bu düşünceleri başkalarına nasıl aktardığımızı keşfederken, merakını izleyicilerine de göstermeye çalışıyor. Mahremiyetimizin hiper-bağlantılı yaşamlarımızda yok oluşunun eski tartışması, artık yön değiştiriyor. Yabancı birinin duymasını istemeyeceğimiz şeyleri, bir süre sonra yakınlarımıza da anlatmamaya başlayabiliyoruz. Gillian Wearing de, erozyona uğrayan davranış biçimlerine, yarattığı maskeler ve performanslarla ayna tutuyor.
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source: valedorasdelgustoblogspot
La identidad, la autorrepresentación, las relaciones humanas y la vida cotidiana son los temas que Gillian Wearing, mujer provocadora, paradógica, y compleja, trata en sus series fotográficas y de vídeo, que podemos conocer en varias exposiciones desde que en 1997 consiguió el Premio Turner, que consagra a los jóvenes artistas británicos, con frecuencia en medio del escándalo y la protesta, no en vano, resultan frecuentes sus conocidas “aptitudes gamberras”.
Los autorretratos de Wearing exploran la fotografía como farsa, además de examinar concepto de identidad y representación. Con una meticulosa atención al detalle y sofisticadas prótesis de silicona, Wearing crea extraordinarios autorretratos que imitan fotos de su álbum de familia. Estas imágenes triunfan porque formulan preguntas sobre la familia, las relaciones y el yo, aspectos todos ellos importantes en la fotografía contemporánea. Otros retratos de la serie, incluyen a su hermano, su abuela y su abuelo.
Fundamentalmente esta mujer, por supuesto, diferente en su concepción del rol de la fotografía en el ámbito de la vida cotidiana, se interesa en que el arte haga bien visible el concepto de las relaciones sociales y profundice en los distintos papeles que desempeñamos en nuestro propio círculo familiar, para ello utiliza los mismos recursos como la cámara invisible, lo imprevisible, el juego de las suposiciones falsas, … y llega a “bromear” con todo lo que conocemos como productos de consumo de la baja cultura, un claro ejemplo, en los reality shows. Gusta también de captar reacciones individuales ante situaciones complejas y la influencia de los medios de comunicación en la propia imagen.
Las filmaciones de Gillian Wearing se basan en los formatos de los documentales de televisión de los años setenta y en los populares programas de confesión. En algunos casos, pone anuncios, como hizo para Trauma, que decía: ‘Experiencia negativa o traumática en la infancia o juventud y deseo de hablar de ello en una película. Se garantiza el anonimato’. En otros vídeos utiliza máscaras. ‘Trato de superar el mero planteamiento obvio, y de no limitarme únicamente a ver la superficie. Trato de arrojar luz más allá de eso. Y ésa es una de las razones por las que empecé a utilizar máscaras. No me interesa el aspecto de una persona por sí mismo’.
Para indagar en el papel de la herencia familiar sobre la propia imagen y las misteriosas conexiones (un gesto, una actitud, un mismo fondo en la mirada…) que van más allá de lo genético, una inquietud que persigue a Wearing desde sus inicios, y empleando la reproducción casi mimética de viejas fotos reales, la artista se ha dedicado a hacer réplicas de su madre, su hermano, sus primos… Estos ejercicios de auto-dramatización son de carácter inquietante —las prendas de ropa son en ocasiones las originales y los gestos duplican los que alguna vez fueron empleados por los imitados— y permitieron a la fotógrafa jugar con la idea de que “las épocas y las generaciones se funden y la cercanía y la distancia se disuelven”, dicen los organizadores de la exposición. La imagen personal siempre está relacionada con el poder Siempre “interesada en la gente”, la artista intenta demostrar que la creación de una imagen “siempre está relacionada con el poder y que la manipulación nunca puede ser totalmente ser evitada”.
Si hay algo que cautiva es la sorprendente elaboración de estas imágenes, en un ejercicio de intromisión de la personalidad que al mismo tiempo supone un desnudo integral por parte de Gillian en el plano emocional. La artista se empapa de sus seres queridos y se entrega por completo en una transmutación absoluta con ellos. Se trata, sin lugar a dudas, de un viaje que ahonda en las relaciones y en el desconcierto entre realidad y ficción, que no deja de sorprender por la magnífica puesta en escena.
Otro de sus proyectos más conocidos es Doubles, autorretratos en los que vuelve a hacer uso de máscaras y caracterización para convertirse en personajes famosos como Lily Cole, Andy Warhol o Diane Arbus, entre otros.
Pero si existe algún proyecto que encumbró a la artista a la fama, éste fue Signs that Say What You Want Them to Say and Not Signs that Say What Someone Else Wants You to Say (1992), que llevó a cabo parando a la gente por la calle y ofreciéndoles un papel para que escribieran lo primero que se les pasara por la cabeza. En numerosas ocasiones, los testimonios eran sobrecogedores y recogían profundas e insondables intimidades.
Gillian Wearing carga a sus espaldas con una extensa obra, siempre enfocada a asuntos sociales y directamente vinculada a las relaciones y a la problemática de la condición humana. Sus trabajos extrapolan valores adversos y nos ofrecen una perspectiva del entorno divertida, surrealista, escalofriante y capaz de alterar nuestros sentidos escudriñando y diseccionando la personalidad de los individuos.
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source: prezi

Vida de Gillian
1963-1992
Gillian Wearing nasceu em Birmingham. Ela estudou arte na Chelsea School of Art e depois no Goldsmiths College, em Londres.

1993-1996
Wearing expôs “Cartazes que dizem o que você quer que eles digam e não cartazes que dizem o que outra pessoa quer que você diga” na galeria City Racing, em Londres. Em 1994 fez “Dançando em Peckham”, um vídeo de si mesma dançando em um shopping center.
Cartazes que dizem o que você quer que eles digam e não cartazes que dizem o que outra pessoa quer que você diga
É uma série com mais de 50 fotografias coloridas de habitantes urbanos. Wearing abordou pessoas na rua e pediu que anotassem numa folha de papel o que passava por suas cabeças e posassem para uma foto exibindo o cartaz.
Nessas imagens, Wearing brinca com os pressupostos da sociedade sobre a aparência das pessoas e os estereótipos que derivam deles.
Os cartazes tornam públicos os pensamentos interiores
privados. As palavras são engraçadas, perturbadoras e
tocantes. Os retratos sugerem que as aparências são
enganosas e, que, na realidade, as pessoas retratadas são
frágeis e complexas.

1997-2005
Em 1997 Wearing fez “2 em 1″ e, para isso, gravou uma mãe e seus dois filhos falando sobre seus conflitos mútuos e, depois, trocou suas vozes de modo com que a mãe adotasse a voz dos filhos e vice-versa. Nesse mesmo ano conquistou o Prêmio Turner. Em 2003 ela posou com membros da família como parte de sua série fotográfica contínua “Álbum”, iniciada em 1993 e baseada em instantâneos da família

Desde 2006
A instalação de Wearing “História da Família” percorreu o Reino Unido. A exposição também incorporou autorretratos de Wearing com seus avós maternos de sua série “Álbum”.
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source: fotografieschulewordpress

Die Konzeptionskünstlerin Gillian Wearing wurde 1963 in Birmingham geboren. Sie studierte am bekannten Londoner Goldsmiths College und wurde in den 1990er Jahren bekannt. 1997 gewann sie den renommierten Turner Prize. In ihren Werken beschäftigt sie sich kritisch mit menschlichen Abgründen, sozialen Konventionen und gemeinschaftlichen Traumata. Sie zählt heute zu den wichtigsten Künstlerinnen ihrer Generation in England.