HELMUT NEWTON

Хельмут Ньютон
赫尔穆特·牛顿
ヘルムート·ニュートン
הלמוט ניוטון

A Scene From Pina Bausch’s Ballet, Die Keuschheitslegende (The Legend of Virginity)


source: photoicon

HELMUT NEWTON pushed back the boundaries of nude photography and became one of the most recognizable figures in the fashion world. He broke the mold by remaining at the forefront of visual style for several decades – a rarity in the fashion and publishing business. But through it all he never forgot he was a refugee who fled Nazi Germany and he got his first break as a photographer in Australia, the most unpretentious nation on the planet.

There is, though, a mystery; a contradiction. Newton disliked being described as an artist. Yet his photographs provide some of the most memorable art of the last half century. He said he had no interest in the inner life of his sitters – “just their bosoms, bums and legs.” Yet, a Newton photograph captures private moments, private lives, a chilling sense that we are glimpsing raw, unprotected souls. You could say that the nude in Newton’s work is merely a metaphor for the nakedness of being.

Newton reveals in naked women a look of indifference, yet an acceptance of everything, their pride, their flesh, their sexuality, a touch of arrogance. His models show no weakness or doubt; they are distant yet available and distil unexplored moments of a woman’s life as if the camera isn’t there. “The challenge,” he once said, “is to show something more of who that woman is.”

‘… a Newton photograph captures private moments, private lives, a chilling sense that we are glimpsing raw, unprotected souls’

Beautiful women with no financial incentive to be photographed naked often had an impulse to reveal themselves to Helmut Newton. Sigourney Weaver, Claudia Schiffer, Naomi Campbell, Jerry Hall, Charlotte Rampling, Catherine Deneuve. “He has the quality of Matisse and the eye of the voyeur,” Deneuve once said, the quality I would say that transforms his work from being merely recognizable to being unique.

Charlotte Rampling thinks of Newton as a movie director who chose to shoot stills. His photographs tell a story; you want to know what just happened and what’s going to happen next. “Still photography is like being brought to a climax, then you stop and start again,” said Rampling. “The experience is frustrating and creates for me an erotic melancholy.”

Newton didn’t merely photograph women, it was a collaboration. The sensual, melancholic experience described by Rampling is the petite mort that lingers between lovers and this undeniable familiarity is captured in every sequence of shots as if his life’s work is the documenting a continuous love affair. You cannot imitate a Newton portrait. Given the same light, the same model, the same pose, when Newton was behind the shutter he would conjure up an ambiguity, something unseen or indefinable.

Would he have appreciated this analysis? He would no doubt have laughed in his distinctive way and got on with taking another photograph. Photography was his passion, his obsession: the unending love affair. He told June, his wife to be, when they first met in Australia in 1948 that she would always be his second love. It was the basis for the perfect marriage and for fifty years she was his partner, his PA, his sounding board and his model.

Helmut Newton was born to a well-off family in Berlin in 1920, the Roaring Twenties, skirts were getting shorter, women were savouring the first taste of liberation. Young Helmut recalls appreciating the bare arms of his beautiful mother in a cocktail dress and would lie in bed watching the maid in the next room naked from the waist up combing her hair. He adored women. He called his autobiography World Without Men. It was the world he constructed in his mind as a boy and lived in as a man.

His father was a button manufacturer who would have liked his son to go into the family business but gave him a camera as a birthday present at the age of twelve and set the wheels of his son’s destiny in motion. Helmut dropped out of school and went to work as an apprentice with fashion photographer Yva, learning his craft in the dark room and fantasising about the beautiful women in tight skirts and stiletto heels clipping along the Kurfurstendamm. He never lost his love of black high heels.

Newton was a Jew. When the horrors of Kristallnacht awoke his parents from their tenuous sense of security in Hitler’s Germany, they fled into exile. His family sailed to South America, while Helmut went alone to the Far East. He would never see his parents again.

From Singapore, Newton moved on to Australia with an expired German passport and was promptly interred as an enemy alien. He went from prison camp into army uniform and served with an Australian regiment four years as an enlisted soldier. He was tireless in his passion to take photographs and shot hundreds of rolls of film, battle scenes and portraits of men in combat.

He grew lean and handsome and discovered after the war a taste for silk shirts and fine living he subsidised more through his role as a gigolo than the shutter action of his camera. But the camera was always present, the emblem of his identity: the tool of his ambition. His early flight from Germany and separation from his family had forced him into a nomadic, independent existence that drove him relentlessly all through his life.

For all its size, Australia was too small for Helmut Newton and he returned to Europe. He lived first in England, but found the country and its people too cold, too closed. His move across the Channel to Paris was the beginning another love affair that would last the rest of his life. Paris was an inspiration, the city of artists and crystal light: the smell of warm croissants a haunting memory of the bakeries in pre-war Berlin, the fluttering display of short skirts on the Champs Elysee a mirror image of the girls on the Kurfurstendamm.

In the dark room in Berlin he had dreamed of being a Vogue photographer and when he got the opportunity to join French Vogue in 1961, he staged fashion shoots in a way that was new, daring, controversial and made him an instant success. He took models out of the studio to use natural light and used locations where you would least expect to find the latest fashions. The styles of those times have not survived – such is fashion – but Newton’s images remain as fresh as ever.

Newton’s lifetime objective to push back the boundaries of photography had begun. The Berlin he remembered was a city of shifting shadows and a damp diffused light that informed his photography wherever he travelled and created a mood of sensuality and decadence. He became legendary for his risqué shots of fashion models. His nudes evoked the louche cabarets of the thirties. As if haunted by those times, he shot nudes in belle epoch ballrooms and fading hotel rooms swagged in velvet drapes and lit by chandeliers. His photographs were a banquet, a feast, a celebration of life.

‘he said once that there are two dirty words in photography: good taste and art’

Helmut Newton took every assignment he was offered. He liked the money, enjoying the luxury as well as the freedom that money brought, and while his work was now moving from the magazine pages to the gallery walls, he never considered the suggestion then in vogue of creating installations or accepting commission from museums. In his distinctive English, he said once that there are two dirty words in photography: good taste and art.

He was, in his own words, a gun for hire. He worked ceaselessly for a decade, moving between the four corners of the box that made up his life: France, Monaco, Germany and Los Angeles. He adored the movies. His life was a movie, non-stop action, another take and another, and he suffered the consequence in 1971 when he was rushed into hospital with a heart attack.

Did he imagine time was running out? He make a surprisingly quick recovery and was anxious to get back to work. He sent out for an automatic camera and began shooting the doctors, the staff, his visitors, and when he came out of hospital he made one concession to his schedule: he began to tell the couturiers (“They’re all prima-donnas!”) what he wanted to shoot and they either accepted or they found a different photographer.

Newton’s work was becoming consistently more audacious, more erotic. In 1976, he published White Women, a declaration of intent that established him as the agent provocateur of the fashion world. So distinct were his images, they became a Vogue hallmark: the gold standard other photographers were expected to reach.

From his early days as a gigolo, Newton continued to lead a fast, decadent lifestyle reflected in his photography. He had innumerable affairs that he spoke of with narcissism, but as a photographer his work not his affairs took pride of place. Like Matisse, as Catherine Deneuve has said, the magic of Helmut Newton’s work is its elusiveness, its sly refusal to admit the true nature of its subject matter: the failure of reality and the triumph of desire. Beautiful women know they are desirable. They know their beauty inspires the imaginations of men. That is why the world’s most beautiful women in recent decades who chose to strip for the camera chose Helmut Newton’s camera to pose for.

Newton’s work has appeared in every major publication from glossy art books to Vogue to Playboy, whose founder Hugh Heffner called him as a giant. “He was a major talent who pushed the boundaries in terms of photography and influenced many, many other photographers in following generations.”

The English author of Crash, JG Ballard, has described Newton’s photography as being as vivid as tomorrow’s news, which in one way it always has been. “Though his clients and their advertising agencies would be appalled by the thought, I imagine that few people coming fresh to Newton’s work would suspect that the nominal purpose of these striking images was to sell a collection of high-priced frocks.”

But then Newton has always been much more than a fashion photographer. “I think of him,” adds Ballard, “as a figurative artist who uses the medium of photography, and his access to gorgeous women, expensive gowns, and exotic locations, to create a unique imaginative world.”

While work by many of Newton’s contemporaries now seems rooted in their own time, trite or quaint; Andy Warhol is one example, Newton’s photography remains fresh, as poetic and mysterious as when it first appeared. Nude photography has always provoked disapproval. The censors are always there to wrap dark cloaks over what they perceive as sexual voyeurism. They look at the surface of such work without recognizing the enchantment: the artistry. Far from demeaning or humiliating his models, Helmut Newton placed them at the heart of his own desires, in a world where they rule with pride and passion, something the models understood, even if the critics did not.

Helmut Newton died in 2004 at the age of 83. He left the Chateau Marmont in Hollywood driving his Cadillac. He lost control and crashed into a wall, a movie ending he probably would have appreciated.
.
.
.
.
.
source: vogueit

Dalla fine degli anni settanta Helmut Newton (1920 -2004) ha rotto i soliti tabù con fotografie provocatorie in bianco e nero cariche di erotismo, di feticismo, a volte con nozioni sado masochiste. La sua visione realistica e a volte cruda ha cambiato il modo di vedere le cose, sia da un punto di vista artistico sia nel campo della fotografia di moda. Newton ha illustrato con un tocco d’ironia i giochi di soldi e di potere in una società decadente dove donne affascinanti e seduttrici sembrano dominare gli uomini, facendoli apparire quasi superflui.

I suoi ritratti di celebrità sono ugualmente potenti e in alcuni s’intravede l’influenza degli artisti espressionisti tedeschi fra le due guerre. Molte giovani generazioni di fotografi hanno tentato di imitare il suo stile, ma il lavoro di Newton rimane unico.

Helmut Neustädter (più tardi noto come Newton) nasce a Berlino nel 1920 e dimostra già da giovanissimo vivo interesse per la fotografia. All’età di dodici anni acquista la sua prima macchina fotografica e nel 1936 lavora per la fotografa tedesca Yva (Elsie Neulander Simon). Le restrizioni oppressive sulla comunità ebraica della quale lui faceva parte, costringe la sua famiglia ad abbandonare la Germania Nazista, Dopo una prima tappa a Singapore, dove Newton lavora brevemente per il Straits Times, poi come fotografo di ritratti, si stabilisce a Sydney nel 1940 prendendo la cittadinanza australiana.

Negli anni del dopoguerra apre uno studio lavorando nel settore della moda e del teatro. Crescendo sempre più la sua reputazione ottiene l’incarico per un supplemento speciale di Vogue Australia; seguono fra gli altri un contratto per Vogue UK, Vogue Paris e Harper’s Bazaar.

Parigi, dove Newton ha lavorato a lungo, e ha passato uno dei suoi periodi più intensi e creativi, organizza da ora fino al 17 giugno la più importante retrospettiva dalla sua morte. L’esposizione al Grand Palais, curata da sua moglie June (anche lei famosa fotografa il cui nome d’arte è Alice Springs) presenta duecento stampe originali, vintage e Polaroid in diversi formati. Esse rivelano i maggiori temi della sua carriera, dalla moda, ai nudi ai ritratti. Inoltre un film documentario intitolato Helmut by June racconta una visione più intima dell’uomo dietro la macchina fotografica.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: luciaadversewordpress

Helmut Newton nasceu no 31 de outubro de 1920, registrado como Helmut Neustädter, foi um fotógrafo de moda alemão, naturalizado australiano, famoso por seus estudos de nus femininos. Filho de um fabricante de botões judeu-alemão e de uma americana. Desde muito jovem – com 12 anos adquiriu sua primeira câmera – interessou-se por fotografia, tendo trabalhado para o fotógrafo alemão Yva (Else Neulander Simon).

Com as restrições cada vez mais opressivas colocadas aos judeus pelas leis de Nuremberg, seu pai perdeu o controle da fábrica de botões e foi internado em um campo de concentração em “Kristallnacht”. Em 1938, o fotógrafo fugiu da Alemanha para escapar à perseguição nazista aos judeus. Depois de sua emigração, tornou-se conhecido como Helmut Newton, um dos fotógrafos mais famosos em todo o mundo. Trabalhou por algum tempo em Cingapura, como fotógrafo da Straits Times, antes de se estabelecer em Melbourne, Austrália. Ao chegar à Austrália, ficou internado em um campo de concentração, assim como muitos outros “estrangeiros inimigos”. Posteriormente serviu ao exército australiano como motorista de caminhão, durante a Segunda Guerra Mundial.

Em 1946, instalou um estúdio fotográfico no qual trabalhou principalmente com moda, nos afluentes anos pós-guerra. Pouco tempo depois tornou-se cidadão australiano. Nos anos seguintes viveu em Londres e Paris, e trabalhou para a Vogue francesa. Criou um estilo particular na fotografia, marcado pelo erotismo. Sua notoriedade aumentou nos anos 80 com a série “Big Nudes”.

Passou os últimos anos de sua vida em Monte Carlo e Los Angeles. Morreu em janeiro de 2004, com 83 anos, vítima de um acidente de automóvel na Califórnia. Suas cinzas foram enterradas em Berlim.
A Fundação Helmut Newton: localizada na sede do novo Museu da Fotografia em Berlim, inaugurou no mesmo ano da morte do fotógrafo.

Desde que deixou sua cidade natal por causa dos nazistas, Berlim nunca saiu da cabeça de Helmut Newton. Segundo sua mulher, June, ele “sempre teve muitas saudades de Berlim e queria voltar para casa”. Talvez por isso, Newton tenha escolhido Berlim como o lar para mais de mil de suas caras e cobiçadas fotografias. Até sua morte, o fotógrafo participou ativamente da organização da fundação. Em outubro de 2003, ele doou não apenas seu arquivo à cidade, mas também o dinheiro para a reforma do antigo prédio próximo à estação Berlin Zoo, sede do novo Museu da Fotografia, que divide o espaço com a Fundação Helmut Newton, responsável pela coleção.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: taschen

Helmut Newton (1920-2004) ha sido uno de los fotógrafos más influyentes de todos los tiempos. Berlinés de nacimiento, llegó a Australia en 1940, donde se casó con June Brunell (alias Alice Springs) ocho años más tarde. Alcanzó fama internacional en la década de 1970, mientras trabajaba fundamentalmente para la edición francesa de Vogue, y su notoriedad e influencia fueron en aumento con el paso de los años. Más que en estudios, Newton prefería fotografiar siempre en calles o interiores. Escenarios polémicos, una iluminación audaz y composiciones llamativas se aliaron para conformar su particular mirada. En 1990 fue galardonado con el Grand Prix National de la photographie y en 1992 el gobierno alemán le concedió la Das Grosse Verdienst­kreuz (Gran Cruz al Mérito) por sus servicios prestados. Ese mismo año fue nombrado Officier des Arts, Lettres et Sciences por la princesa Carolina de Mónaco y, en 1996, Commandeur de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres por parte de Philippe Douste-Blazy, ministro francés de Cultura por aquel entonces. Hasta su muerte, a la edad de 83 años, vivió y trabajó en estrecha colaboración con su esposa. Sus imágenes siguen manteniendo el carácter inconfundible, seductor y original de siempre.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: over-blog

Helmut Newton fait ses études à Berlin et se découvre très tôt un vif intérêt pour la photographie. En 1938, il quitte l’Allemagne pour l’Australie, où il s’installera durablement et il s’engagera même dans l’armée australienne pour combattre les soldats d’Hitler.
Une fois la guerre finie, Newton va se consacrer pleinement à sa passion pour la photo et va collaborer régulièrement avec le magazine Playboy, pour lequel il créera ses premiers clichés de starlettes dénudées. Puis, vers 1950, sa passion pour les photos de modes l’emmènera à collaborer avec de nombreux magazines de modes, dont Vogue.
Son installation à Paris, en 1961, lui permettra de rencontrer de nombreuses célébrités telles que Catherine Deneuve, qui font partie des centaines de modèles célèbres ou inconnus qui se seront pressés pour se faire immortaliser par ce grand maître du huitième art.
Victime d’un accident de voiture le 23 janvier 2004, il décèdera à Los Angeles, à l’âge de 83 ans. Selon sa volonté, il est enterré à Berlin, où ses fans viennent chaque année commémorer sa disparition.

Helmut Newton va faire ses premiers clichés dès 1936. A l’époque, il est l’élève d’Yva, photographe allemande très renommée.
C’est surtout dans les années 1970 que son style porno chic va s’affirmer, popularisé par la version française du magazine Vogue, qui n’hésitera pas à publier ses photos provocantes, mêlées de mode et de sexualité. Puis, les magazines ELLE et Marie-Claire vont eux aussi se laisser tenter par la publication des clichés sulfureux et esthétiques de Newton.
Son style, montrant des femmes dénudées, dominatrices, évoluant dans des décors luxueux, faits de villas de milliardaires et de palaces, est reconnaissable entre mille.
Ses modèles, de sculpturales créatures, ont toujours arboré un maquillage sophistiqué, ainsi qu’un air glacial et inaccessible, que recherchait Newton pour provoquer de vives réactions chez ceux qui verraient ses clichés.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: whoswhode

Helmut Newton wurde 1920 als Sohn einer wohlhabenden jüdischen Fabrikantenfamilie in Berlin geboren.

Newton besuchte bis zu den nationalsozialistischen Rassengesetzen das Werner-von-Treitschke-Gymnasium in Berlin. Dann war er Schüler einer amerikanischen Schule in Berlin. Schon in dieser Zeit galt Newtons ganzes Interesse der Fotografie. Mit zwölf Jahren erwarb er seinen ersten Fotoapparat. Die Schule musste er vorzeitig mangels Leistungen verlassen. Danach, im Jahr 1936, begann er eine Fotografenlehre bei der berühmten Berliner Modefotografin Yva, mit bürgerlichem Namen Else Simon. Sie wurde später von den Nationalsozialisten im Konzentrationslager Auschwitz umgebracht.

Nach zwei Jahren Lehrzeit verließ Helmut Newton im Dezember 1938 Berlin. Er ging zunächst nach Singapur, wo er für die “Singapore Straits Times” als Bildreporter arbeitete. Nach nur zwei Wochen verlor jedoch, angeblich wegen mangelnder Eignung, seine Anstellung. Auch Newtons Familie hatte inzwischen aufgrund der politischen Ereignisse 1938 Deutschland in Richtung Südamerika verlassen. Unter den Lebensbedingungen des Exils, setzte Newton zum Brotverdienst alles in Fotografie um, was er als Auftragsarbeit bekommen konnte. In dieser Zeit machte er gegen geringes Honorar Aufnahmen von Babywäsche, Hochzeiten, Kindertaufen und anderen Veranstaltungen, oder er fertigte Passfotos an.

Sein unruhiger Lebensstil in dieser Phase drückte sich in den vielen Reisen aus. Jahrelang lebte er von der Hand in den Mund. 1940 siedelte Newton nach Australien über. Dort leistete er zunächst einen fünfjährigen Militärdienst, wobei er als LKW-Fahrer oder als Streckenarbeiter zum Einsatz kam. Nachdem er aus dem Militärdienst entlassen worden war, gründete Newton ein Fotostudio in Melbourne. 1948 verheiratete er sich mit der Schauspielerin June Brunell. Nach anfänglichen Widerständen ihres Mannes wurde sie selbst ab 1970 mit Erfolg unter dem Pseudonym Alice Springs als Fotografin tätig. Dabei nahm sie auch Einfluss auf die Arbeiten Newtons. So fertigte sie zum Beispiel Porträtstudien über ihn an.

Anfang der 1960er Jahre siedelte Newton nach Paris über, wo er seine internationale Karriere als Fotograf begann. Ab 1961 war er für die französische Zeitschrift “Vogue” tätig. Dort konnte er im Laufe von 25 Jahren seine bedeutendsten Modebilder publizieren. Ebenso realisierte er Auftragsarbeiten für internationale Zeitschriften, wie zum Beispiel Queen, Elle, Marie Claire, Linea Italiana oder Jardin des Mode. Helmut Newton avancierte zu einem berühmten und gefragten Fotografen. Ab dieser Zeit stieg die Nachfrage internationaler Magazine nach den Bildern von Helmut Newton rapide an. Er machte etliche Foto-Ausstellungen, die sehr gut besucht waren.

Als Fotograf erhielt er zahllose internationale Preise und Auszeichnungen, wie beispielsweise den “World Image Award” oder den “Grand Prix national de la ville de Paris”. Newtons Bilder gelten nicht nur als provozierend kalte Inszenierungen, sondern werden auch mit den Merkmalen “sexuelle Detailversessenheit” und “nackte Obsessionen” belegt. Seine Ablichtungen von nackten oder halbnackten Frauen in herausfordernden Posen brachten Feministinnen und auch andere Betrachter gegen ihn auf. Helmut Newton machte den menschlichen Körper zu seinem Hauptmotiv. Er zeigte ihn in zahllosen und in den unterschiedlichsten Situationen.

Durch seine Bilder schuf er ein anderes Bewusstsein über den menschlichen Körper. Im Juli 2003 eröffnete Newton die Ausstellung “Yellow Press” in Mailand. Hier beschäftigte er sich mit den Themen Menschen und Gewalt.

Helmut Newton starb am 23. Januar 2004 bei einem Autounfall in Los Angeles.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: admeru

Гениальный фотохудожник Хельмут Ньютон (Helmut Newton), желал он этого или нет, уже давно признан классиком фотографии ХХ века. Своими работами этот человек изменил представления о моде, сексуальности и красоте. Снимая моду, Ньютон был на шаг впереди нее. Его снимки, сделанные на заре 70-х годов, не теряют своей харизмы и сейчас, а ведь современного человека сложно удивить.
Фотографии Ньютона украшали страницы журналов Playboy, Elle, Vogue, Queen, Harper’s Bazaar. Несмотря на характерный для многих его работ налет декаданса, Ньютон никогда не воспевал блестящий мир шоу-бизнеса, но тщательно препарировал и изучал его. Он не просто зевака, подглядывающий за знаменитостями, он — проницательный наблюдатель, которого интересует не внешняя сторона вещей, а их суть и скрытый смысл.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: artphoto-site

ヘルムート・ニュートンは1920年ドイツのベルリンの裕福なユダヤ人家庭に生まれました。 12歳で既に自分自身でカメラを買い写真を撮り始めます。彼はマーティン・ムンカッチのルポルタージュに魅了され、自身も写真家を志すようになります。1936年からベルリンのファッションおよび演劇専門の女性写真家エルセ・サイモン(通称イヴァ)の見習いになり写真を学び始めます。
しかし、その後はナチの迫害を逃れてシンガポールに渡ります。1940年にオーストラリアに移り市民権を獲得、メルボルンで写真スタジオを開きます。この頃にジューン夫人(アリス・スプリング)と知り合い1948年に結婚しています。

1952年にヴォーグ・オーストラリア版で仕事を始めます。1957~1958年にはヴォーグ・イギリス版と契約して、一時ロンドンに住んでいます。1962年にパリに移り住みヴォーグ・フランス版の仕事がきっかけで実力が認められるようになります。初期のニュートンの写真は映画やドラマをヒントにしたものが多く見られます。しかし70年代以降に開花するヨーロッパ上流階級の退廃的な雰囲気と潜在的な暴力、エロティシズムを感じさせるスタイルのベースをこの時代の写真に発見することができます。60年~70年代にかけて各国のヴォーグ誌、マリークレール、エル、シュテルン、プレイボーイで大活躍します。

彼のスタイルは1971年に心臓発作を起こして大きな転機を迎えます。それ以降ニュートンは自分の体のことを考え自分の望むイメージしか撮らなくなります。雑誌やクライエントの為に心臓に負担のかかるプレッシャーの中でアイデアを絞りだすことをやめたのです。彼は戦前のベルリン時代からの自分自身の体験をベースにしたイメージのみを撮影することになります。

彼の写真スタイルはより激しいセクシーさやエロティシズムを追求するように変貌していきました。今までファッション写真ではタブーであった 売春婦、フェティシュ、女性の男装などをモチーフに取り入れるようになるのです。時代の流れを先取りしたイメージは最初ポルノだとの物議をかもしました。しかしこのスタイルの変化が彼のオリジナリティーを確かなものにし、特に写真集 “White Women”を1976年に出版後は彼は写真家どころかアーティストの地位を不動のものとしていきます。

1975年からオリジナル・プリントの展示、販売を初め、彼の作品は世界中のギャラリー、美術館で 展示されるとともにコレクションされています。1981年よりモナコに在住、80歳を過ぎても現役で広告、ヴォーグ誌、ヴァニティー・フェアー誌で作品を発表していました。 日本ではヘアヌードがブームの90年代前半に石田えりの写真集を撮り下ろして話題になりました。また2002年には世界巡回写真展”Helmut Newton Work”が大丸ミュージアムで開催さています。

2003年には自叙伝”Helmut Newton Autobiography”Random House刊、を発表し更なる活躍が期待されていましたが、 2004年1月23日、ハリウッドのChateau Marmont Hotel を出るとき、自らが運転するキャデラックが 壁に激突して事故死しました。83歳でした。
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: haaretzcoil

הלמוט ניוטון היה צלם האופנה המשפיע ביותר במאה ה-20. הוא הביא אל עולם האופנה את הצד האפל של הזוהר, את תבנית נוף עיר הולדתו ברלין ואת אווירת הדקדנס האירופי במלוא תפארתו. ניוטון, בן 83, נהרג בשבוע שעבר בתאונת דרכים בלוס אנג’לס, לאחר שלקה בהתקף לב בזמן נהיגה ואיבד שליטה על מכוניתו.

במלונות הפאר של מונטה קרלו (שבה חי במשך רוב חייו הבוגרים), בגינות של ארמונות פאריס, ברחובות העתיקים, הדוגמניות שלו הונצחו כאמזונות עשויות ללא חת, ארוכות רגליים, בנעלי עקב וביריות, פרוות וקולרי יהלומים, חליפות גבריות מחויטות, שפתיים משוחות באודם חזק ופטמות זקורות. הן צולמו תמיד מלמטה, מואדרות, מפתות, מאיימות, מושכות, חזקות.

בסרט תיעודי על חייו סיפר ניוטון תוך צחקוק שובב על פטנט שמצא בארצות הברית – זוג פטמות מסיליקון שהיה מורה לדוגמניותיו ללבוש מתחת לחולצה. “הסביבה הקרובה שלי תמיד מסתורית ומרגשת בעיני יותר מאשר איים אקזוטיים ומקומות רחוקים. אני אוהב לצלם מקומות ואובייקטים שאני רואה יום-יום. התצלומים האהובים עלי ביותר הם פעמים רבות אלה שמעוררים רגש, תחושה חזקה של היכרות, של ‘כבר הייתי פה פעם’. כשאני עובד רחוק מהבית, אני אף פעם לא מתרחק יותר משלושה ק”מ מהמלון שלי”. אמר בראיון עם צאת הקטלוג של תערוכת הצילומים הגדולה שנערכה לכבוד יום הולדתו ה-80 בברלין, ב-2000. באותה שנה הוצגה גם במוזיאון תל אביב תערוכה של תצלומיו, ובהם הסדרות “רכוש פרטי” ו”עירומים גדולים”.

התצלומים שלו נעו תמיד על הגבול בין מה שלגיטימי לפרסם במגזין יוקרתי כמו ה”ווג” למה שעשוי לעורר שערורייה. תצלומיו גררו לרוב תגובות קיצוניות: הם זכו להערצה, אך גם לגינויים על דרכו להציג דימויים נשיים פרובוקטיוויים.

ניוטון נולד בנובמבר 1920, למשפחה יהודית בעלת מפעל מצליח לייצור כפתורים. הוא התחנך בגימנסיה הריאלית של ברלין, עד שחוקי נירנברג הפרידו בין היהודים לארים. אז עבר לבית הספר האמריקאי בברלין, לאחר ששיכנע את אביו שהוא רוצה להיות צלם. הוא לא נשאר זמן רב בבית הספר, וסולק מפאת עצלנותו חסרת התקנה והעניין המוגזם שגילה בתחביביו: שחייה, בחורות וצילום.

בין 1936 ל-1938 עבד כמתלמד אצל הצלמת הברלינאית איבה (אלזה סימון), שנרצחה מאוחר יותר על ידי הנאצים באושוויץ. בדצמבר 1938 עזב את ברלין לסינגפור. הוא החל לעבוד כצלם עיתונות ב”סינגפור סטרייט טיימס”, אך לאחר שבועיים פוטר – בגלל חוסר כישרון, לטענת עורכיו.

ב-1940 הגיע לאוסטרליה. אחרי שירות צבאי של חמש שנים, בעיקר כנהג, פתח סטודיו קטן לצילום במלבורן. ב-1948 נשא לאשה את השחקנית ג’ון ברונל. לברונל, בעלת היופי הקשוח, היתה השפעה מכרעת על עבודתו. היא עצמה היתה ב-1970 לצלמת, ועבדה תחת השם המקצועי אליס ספרינגס.

ב-1961 הצטרף ניוטון לצוות הצלמים הקבוע של ה”ווג” הצרפתי, ובמשך 25 שנה הנציח את אופנת התקופה. היתה לו זווית אישית, שהפכה את צילומיו למזוהים כל כך, בעלי סגנון ושפה משלהם.

“תמיד נמנעתי מלצלם בסטודיו”, אמר באחד הראיונות בעבר, “אף אשה לא מעבירה את חייה בישיבה או בעמידה לפני רקע לבן. גם אם זה מסבך את החיים, אני מעדיף לקחת את המצלמה שלי לרחוב, למקומות ציבוריים ופרטיים, מקומות שהרבה פעמים נגישים רק לעשירים. ולמקומות שהם מחוץ לתחום לצלמים שתמיד משכו אותי במיוחד”.

תצלומו המפורסם מ-1975, של דוגמנית בחליפה גברית של איב סאן לורן, הוא אבן דרך בתולדות האופנה, הלוכדת את האלגנטיות, המסתוריות והמיניות שבמראה האנדרוגני. תצלומי הנשים הכפותות שלו, הדוגמניות הכלואות בתוך סד רפואי מתחת לנברשות קריסטל מנצנצות, משחקי השליטה בחדרי מלונות פאר, החיבור המיני שקשר בין נשים למכוניות – כולם היו לדימויים מלאי עוצמה בלקסיקון הפרטי של השפה שיצר.

ניוטון איפשר למציאות ולפנטסיה לחבור יחד, הוא הביא את האזורים האפלים של הזוהר אל המרכז, האיר את החלקים הנידחים של עולם סוריאליסטי מלא תשוקות אסורות והפך אותו לחלק מתמונת האופנה של המאה ה-20.