IRIS VAN HERPEN

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source:voguecom

Writing about Iris van Herpen, one can find oneself mired in the technicalities of her creations. There’s computer programming and physics and alchemy behind each one; they’re complicated to make and just as difficult to explain. Better is to think of her work as art pieces, with each dress a canvas and the model who wears it the frame on which it’s stretched.

This season van Herpen collaborated with American kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe, whose pieces are powered by the wind. His spherical Omniverse sculpture had pride of place in the Élysée Montmartre venue. The designer said she was compelled by the way its arching vertebrae, spinning on a curving axis, simultaneously expand and contract. Her finale dress was made in the image of Omniverse, with rotating wings constructed of aluminum, stainless steel, and feathers. For the show, Van Herpen explained, the spinning was mechanized, but outside in the wind the wings would twist just like Howe’s kinetic sculptures. It was spectacular but in a performative way.

What’s so interesting about this collection is the way that even the pieces without Howe’s input were kinetic. They positively vibrated. Van Herpen achieved this in part by utilizing the Japanese ink-on-water technique of suminagashi; it created a print of lines, which she heat bonded to Mylar and laser cut in contrapositive ways. See what we mean about complicated? There were many other compelling treatments besides, including the same “glitch” laser cutting that yielded Broadway mogul Jordan Roth’s arresting Met Gala look, only here she did it on silk duchesse painted with erotic flowers. Picking up on Howe’s work, Van Herpen’s theme for the season was nature and the interconnectedness of its systems. A pair of other glitch dresses looked animal spotted. Suffice to say the collection earned its moniker: Hypnosis.
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source:wwdcom

A central theme in Iris van Herpen’s body of work is movement and how it is expressed at the infinitely small and large ends of the scale. This season, inspired by the wind-powered kinetic outdoor work of American artist Anthony Howe, who created the “Omniverse” installation that hung above the runway, the Dutch designer explored the “manifolds within our ecologies” — a representation of life cycles, for those not into theoretical mathematics.

“I really wanted to express the feeling I got from his work into the collection,” she said after the show. “I looked at the patterns and how they are being created but also dissolved. The glitches are very much symbolizations of how we as people are a threat, but I wanted to also express the beauty at the same time.”

Visual disruption was expressed as prints that were then laser-cut, causing every movement of the wearer to dissolve the pattern. One dress looked like a stream of ink in water cascading down the body — evoking the Japanese art of suminagashi via a complex assembly of shimmering fabric, Mylar and transparent tulle. Another was a changeant version of a Rorschach test, blurring pattern and body.
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source:spectrumnews1com

Dior’s Chiuri channels black in Paris, receives top honor
By Associated Press
PUBLISHED 4:50 PM ET Jul. 01, 2019

PARIS (AP) — Dior went back to the essential architecture of dressmaking, and the late designer’s penchant for black, for a brooding display Monday of archetypally couture gowns.

Looking on inside the Parisian house’s design studios on Avenue Montaigne were Gal Gadot and Shailene Woodley, who waited for the tardy couple Priyanka Chopra and Nick Jonas, as actress Elisabeth Moss spoke to The Associated Press about women’s empowerment.

Dior’s designer Maria Grazia Chiuri, meanwhile, was bestowed France’s highest civilian award, the Legion of Honor, shortly after the show for her contribution to French fashion.

Here are some highlights of the fall-winter 2019 couture collections in Paris.

DIOR GOES BACK TO BLACK

“I could write a book about black,” Christian Dior once declared.

Designer Maria Grazia Chiuri used this as a mantra to produce a dramatic display, one that was nearly all in black and featured veiled models in couture that celebrated the power of architecture and the sculptural female form.

Black mesh and sheer catsuits exposed legs, shoulders and arms in sensual transparencies that showed off the body, while dark capes did exactly the opposite and enveloped the body in black taffeta jacquard.

“Designing a collection almost entirely in black, punctuated by rare colors that reveal its power, implies a return to fundamentals, to the foundations of haute couture,” explained the house.

Flashes of white provided historic musing — such as one formless ancient Greek tunic in white silk that gained its structure from the curves of the model’s body, with “Are clothes modern?” emblazoned across. So too did caryatids, stone sculptures of women that structurally hold up Greek temples, that provided the inspiration for one of the collection’s key silhouettes.

Evoking architecture more literally was the final look: A naked model “wearing” a replica of Dior’s atelier building made in gold leaf.

This design, which prompted chuckles from guests, was a welcome relief from what was a sometimes heavy and overly repetitive 65-look-collection.

ELISABETH MOSS

As the star of the hit dystopian series about female servitude ‘The Handmaid’s Tale,’ Moss had much to say on female empowerment before she graced Dior’s front row.

Moss has won a Golden Globe for her performance of a woman who is captured and forced to become a handmaid because she is fertile — a cynical narrative which shines a light on society’s objectification of women.

The series comes at a time when Dior has, too, shone a light on women’s issues by naming its first female designer, Maria Grazia Chiuri, who has made female empowerment an emblem of recent collections.

“‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ is part of the same movement as finally having a female designer at Dior,” said Moss, on the sidelines of the show.

“We’re talking more about women recently across the board and it’s wonderful. Maria Grazia has an empowering vision, and Dior is so much about women themselves, rather than just the clothes,” she added.

FASHIONABLY LATE

Chopra and Jonas arrived almost an hour late for the Dior show, forcing actresses such as Gadot and Woodley to wait. Upon arrival, the couple triggered a media scrum inside the already squeezed atelier space.

It provoked grumbles from many invitees.

Chopra and Jonas were traveling through Paris after attending the wedding ceremony of brother Joe Jonas and “Game of Thrones” star Sophie Turner in the south of France.

IRIS VAN HERPEN’S UNIVERSE

Season upon season, Dutch wunderkind Iris Van Herpen plunges her marveling guests into a parallel universe — one replete with creations evoking underwater mollusks, electric shocks, audio waves, and fabrics resembling interlocking parts of crystals.

On Monday, the latest chapter of her world was unveiled amid a giant halo of pearly white organic shell discs designed by American artist Anthony Howe. It set the tone for a fantastical, aquatic spectacle.

The fibers and translucence of jellyfish and deep water life were a key theme in the 19 looks.

It produced beautiful trapezoid silhouettes that blurred the lines between fashion and pure art.

One bustier dress, if it can be called that, was made of interlocking semicircles of sheer fabric with a black fibrous edge.

Its stiff collar, while organic-looking, also evoked the historic ruffs of Elizabethan England in a sublime play in contradiction.

Incredibly, Van Herpen also managed to capture the limp gravity of tentacles moving under water in a series of multicolored three-dimensional gowns with divergent, floating layers.

A watery sheen, achieved by ancient silk moiré weaving, made some guests feels as if they were several leagues under the sea.

SCHIAPARELLI’S DESIGNER DEBUT

Ever since the legendary house of Elsa Schiaparelli was relaunched in 2012, design team changes over a short space of time caused turbulence at the brand that struggled to hone a clear artistic voice.

With the appointment of its third creative director in five years, Daniel Roseberry, who was poached from Thom Browne, the brand hopes to change that.

Roseberry’s debut couture collection was sassy, playful and modern — and some reasons why the house should be hopeful.

The 30 creations managed to toe the line between the Schiaparelli signatures — the shocking pink, the 30s elegance, and the touches of Surrealism — with an aesthetic that was contemporary and often very sexy.

A silk bustier dress in marbled segments of eye-popping reds, yellows and blues with sequined cups on the bust was constructed from interlocking strips of material. It flapped playfully at the bottom — part prom-queen, part clown. A long lizard earring only added to the fun.

Elsewhere, a bejeweled python adorned one female model’s neck like a shawl on sheer black fabric, exposing the nipples and the vulnerability of human flesh.

CHIURI GETS LEGION OF HONOR

An emotional Chiuri was recognized for her contribution to French culture through her creative platform at Dior just hours after her couture show.

Symbolically, it was French Minister for Equality Marlene Schiappa who presented France’s highest civilian honor to Chiuri during a ceremony — instead of the culture minister. Chiuri has made it her hallmark at the LVMH-owned house to trumpet her feminist roots.

Model Natalia Vodianova, who is the partner of LVMH’s communications chief Antoine Arnault, told The Associated Press of her joy for Chiuri.

“It’s a very happy moment. And I think it’s so incredibly deserved for the way she took Dior, not only as a brand, but also as a platform,” said Vodianova.

“She helped the movement toward women’s equality with everything that she did.”
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source:numerocom

FASHION WEEK
À l’Élysée Montmartre, c’est dans un décor théâtral qu’Iris van Herpen présente sa nouvelle collection haute couture : en plein centre de la salle, une sculpture imaginée par l’artiste américain Anthony Howe encadre les modèles d’un mouvement giratoire hypnotisant. Véritables échos à cette chorégraphie mécanique, les nouvelles pièces de la créatrice néerlandaise apparaissent alors, construites sur cette expression de l’ondoiement. Dans la continuité de sa précédente collection, on retrouve les masques réalisés en impression ainsi que la même technique d’assemblage de fragments d’organza cernés de noir, composant autour du corps des volumes aériens. Le blanc s’y dilue progressivement dans les tons bleus, rouges et verts, tandis que viennent vibrer sur des robes flottantes des imprimés glitchés tels des hologrammes. Grâce à un système fait d’aluminium et d’acier, des parties de la robe finale tournent sur elles-mêmes tels des moulins, auxquels la sculpture d’Anthony Howe donne toute leur dimension. Une fois de plus, Iris van Herpen capte la légèreté dans la structure, exprimant par ses silhouettes éthérées un pas de plus vers leur envol.
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source:ellepl

Iris van Herpen tym razem współpracowała z amerykańskim rzeźbiarzem – Anthony Howe słynie z obiektów kinetycznych. Efekt ruchu projektantka uzyskała także z pomocą japońskiej techniki barwienia Suminagashi “floating ink” – to dzięki niej jej suknie sprawiały wrażenie, jakby wibrując wirowały. Prawdziwa galeria sztuki na wybiegu.