Julia Dault

Julia Dault 44

source: juliadault

Julia Dault is an artist based in Brooklyn, New York. Her first museum exhibition, “Color Me Badd,” opens in September at the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery in Toronto, which will be followed in May 2015 by an exhibition at the Contemporary Art Gallery in Vancouver. The two exhibitions will be accompanied by a catalogue. She will present a solo exhibition at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, in Spring 2015.

Recent solo exhibitions include China Art Objects, Los Angeles; Galerie Bob van Orsouw, Zurich; and Jessica Bradley, Toronto. Her work is currently on view in “Elevated: Contemporary Art in the AGO Tower,” Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, and was recently included in the group exhibitions “Americana: Selections from the Collection,” at the Pérez Art Museum Miami, and “Outside the Lines” at the Contemporary Arts Museum Houston.

Dault’s work is in the permanent collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto; the Museum of Modern Art Warsaw; and the Pérez Art Museum Miami.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: artsynet

Julia Dault is known for richly textured paintings on pleather, silk, and spandex, and for sculptural works fixed to gallery walls with string and knots. Plexiglas, formica, and Everlast boxing wraps—Dault’s materials of choice—lend her sleek abstract sculptures a raw, industrial aesthetic, while they retain a certain naturalness through their rounded organic forms. In her paintings, Dault likewise focuses on depth and materiality by building up colorful layers of paint and vinyl and then scraping parts away. For instance, the sharp-edged, fan-shaped cuts into the monochromatic black painting Jordache (2012) reveal an array of colors, rhythmic gestures, and surprising materials beneath the surface. “There is something very fleeting about Dault’s work; a sense of movement and manipulation reminiscent of highly-stylized time machines,” wrote one critic.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: flat-surface

Julia Dault is an artist based in Brooklyn, New York. This year she will present solo exhibitions at Jessica Bradley, Toronto, and Galerie Bob van Orsouw, Zurich. In 2012, she presented a solo exhibition as part of the series “Inside the White Cube” at White Cube Bermondsey, London, and participated in “Roundtable,” the Ninth Gwangju Biennale, and “The Ungovernables,” the second New Museum Triennial. Her work has been exhibited at the Marrakech Biennale, Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, and other international venues, and is part of the permanent collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: whitecube

Physical negotiations with material and a bold relationship to colour are central to Julia Dault’s artistic practice. Informed by, but not adhering to, Minimalism, Dault’s richly textured paintings and sculptures suggest fantastical tendencies in their manipulated materiality. Combining surprise and discovery, her paintings are multi-layered illusions that play with our sense of depth by both removing and re-applying paint onto different surfaces.

Dault often incorporates unusual materials such as pleather, silk and spandex instead of canvas as the painting’s ground. After building up colour through layers of vinyl and paint, she then exposes these underlying support materials through a process of removal, taking away areas of paint using a plasterers’ comb or other similar utensil. Through these expressive gestures kaleidoscopic patterns emerge, evocative of styles associated with disco and bling. In the painting Jordache (2012), for example, a silkscreen squeegee creates sharp-edged, fan-like gestures that cut away the black paint. Such twists and turns reveal an array of colours beneath the once monochrome surface and document the artist’s rhythmic gestures.

In her sculptural works, always built by the artist on site, string and knots keep the forms fixed to the wall, whilst Plexiglas and Formica bend and fold to create undulating abstract forms that appear ready to burst or collapse at any moment. The sculptures have a potential energy that encourages viewers to navigate open space while still engaging in a closer relationship with their construction. Each sculpture is titled with a stamp documenting the amount of time it took to complete; each work is contingent on Dault’s strength and energy at the time. The sculptures, much like the paintings, document Dault’s bodily engagement with the material, her mark always present through colour and form.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: selectartbr

Julia Dault, cujas esculturas, feitas de rolos de plexiglass amarrados com barbante e empilhados, parecem substanciais o suficiente, mas necessitam do apoio de uma parede do museu para ficar em pé. Operando segundo restrições auto-atribuídas, a sra. Dault criou casa escultura em uma única sessão, dobrando e amarrando ela mesma os materiais de difícil manejo. A forma final depende da força física de que ela é capaz de dispor em um determinado dia. O resultado: minimalismo contingente; Fluxus com músculo.