KEIKO TAKAHASHI

Diorama Table

source: joeystorytellingblogspot

“diorama table “ is an interactive table installation. People place physical objects on the table and projected elements such astrains, cars, houses, and trees appear and are interacted withphysical objects.

“This project tried merging between physical objects in daily life and fantastic images. The interacts add more humors to their daily lives, participants feel comfortable and trigger their imagination.”

I was reading Interface Cultures – Artistic Aspects of Interaction book, Keiko Takahashi, the artist behind the diorama table, shares her idea behind the table:

“I wanted to create a table that becomes a city just like when we used to play with wood blocks and miniature cars….When you were a child, you must have dreamt about things that do not exist in real life. I also fantasized and wished that those things would actually exist. That is why i started to create interactive installations. I wanted to bring the fantasy world I dreamt of into reality.”

She also went on to discuss about her own opinion on media art, which to her, seemed to be “cold, digital and lacked in human warmth” and with her installations, she wanted to bring in warmth and inspire “sweet childhood memories” that people of all ages could share and experience it together.
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source: filefestivalorg

“Diorama Table” is a project that explores a new form of merging interactive images into our daily life. When the participants put daily objects such as cups, ropes or candies on the table, paintings of houses, trees or trains appear according to their shapes. They can also arrange a town by putting daily objects on the table or watch a town changing in front of them whenever they add a new object. This work provides a unique experience where physical objects and fantastic images interact. Ropes: When the participants put ropes on the table and link them, the ropes become railroads and trains appear on them. When the participants make a small circle with a rope, it becomes a pond and ducks fly there and swim on it. When the rope is removed, the pond disappears and the ducks fly away. Chopsticks, forks, and spoons: When the participants put spoons, forks or chopsticks on the table, automobiles appear and start to run on the table. Cup and saucers: When the participants put cups and saucers on the table, images of houses, trees and buildings appear around of them. A cat always looks for a place to sleep, so it is hiding under the plate or cup. When the participants remove a cup or a plate, they find the cat which wakes up and leaves, in order to find another place to sleep. A small candy or a chocolate: When the participants put a small candy on the table, a dog appears, runs towards the candy and bites it.

Bio

Keiko Takahashi and Shinji Sasada´s collaboration works have been exhibited internationally at galleries, festivals, and museums as ISEA2002, the 5th and 10th Japan Media Festival, Siggraph 2003 and 2007, and Ars Electonica Center (2007-2008). Awards include Prix Ars Electronica 2001.
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source: buzzon

Já o trabalho de Keiko Takahashi alia brincadeiras de criança com arte interativa.
A “Diorama Table”, nome da instalação que Takahashi traz ao Brasil, é baseada em um sistema composto por dois computadores, uma câmera de vídeo, um projetor e uma mesa comum, além do software, desenvolvido em conjunto com Shinji Sasada.
O visitante pode mover coisas sobre a mesa, como xícaras, cordões, garfos e colheres, que logo surgem carrinhos, trens, cachorros, patos, prédios e flores para enfeitar o ambiente.
Outra instalação interessante é uma máquina de fliperama que reproduz o filme “O Encouraçado Potemkin” (1923), obra-prima do cineasta russo Sergei Eisenstein (1898-1948).
Para quem não quer saber de arte e só deseja curtir alguns joguinhos em PC, PlayStation 3 ou Wii, os organizadores distribuem senhas para jogar gratuitamente por até 15 minutos.