Marc Quinn

مارك كوين
마크 퀸
מארק קווין
МАРКА КУИННА

Allanah & Buck

Marc Quinn   Allanah & Buck

source: theguardian

Marc Quinn stands proudly over his latest sculpture. It’s brilliantly detailed, sensual and a little bit rude. A woman is having sex with a man from behind. At first sight, it’s a simple conceit, a reversal of traditional gender roles. Only when you look underneath the bronze couple do you realise there’s something more going on. The woman has a penis, the man a vagina.

Five years ago, Quinn made a series of sculptures of people with disabilities whose body defined them – most famously Alison Lapper, armless and with short legs, displayed on Trafalgar Square’s fourth plinth. Now he’s made a new series featuring people who have defined their body, using plastic surgery and hormones, to turn it into something that reflects their inner self.

So, in the case of models Allanah Starr and Buck Angel, she was originally a he and he was originally a she, and to an extent he is still a he and she is still a she, and that’s before we even consider the possibility of a third sex.

Quinn has always been fascinated by the human body and the dubious concept of normality. “The world is so weird that you don’t have to make things up, you just find things.” He discovered Buck Angel on the internet by typing into the search engine the words “plastic surgery” and “transformation”. Buck knew Quinn’s work and loved the idea of posing for him. He told the artist about his friend Allanah, who had gone the other way and with whom he had made a film. The movie was a first in the pornography world.

Alongside Buck and Allanah are sculptures of the Catman, actor Pamela Anderson, Michael Jackson, Thomas Beatie (better known as the pregnant man) and adult “breast entertainer” Chelsea Charms. All rebuilt themselves in different ways. Beatie was born Tracy LaGondino and underwent a sexual reassignment procedure in order to become a man. But he kept his female reproductive organs and became pregnant in 2007 by artificial insemination. He is now expecting his third child. The huge white marble sculpture of him is astonishing: George Michael meets Michelangelo’s David. The David reference is deliberate – it’s not simply the scale, but the sense of innocence and purity. Which makes even weirder the fact that the bloke with the beard is pregnant. More than anything, it’s Beatie’s pants that make this such an intimate and human work – the creases, the pulls in the crotch, the way one leg rides up. “Sculpture’s all about drapery, isn’t it?” Quinn says. “Recreating the movement of fabric in marble is one of the classic sculptural themes.” He looks up towards Beatie’s pants as we speak. “What’s interesting is that the scale puts us in a child-adult relationship to it. So it infantilises us, the viewer.”

Quinn established himself in Charles Saatchi’s Sensation show with Self, a frozen bust of his head made from 10 pints of his own blood. It was grotesque and gorgeous and, as so often in his work, turned the world inside out. Like much of the art produced by his generation, it dealt with time and degeneration – keep it at the wrong temperature and it melts into its original form. His father was a scientist, and Quinn combined art and science to ask existential questions. What are we? What can we become? What is natural and unnatural? In a later project, he created a cryogenically frozen garden from flowers that in the natural world could never grow together.

One project tends to evolve into another. So the frozen garden led to his recent acid-trip garden paintings, and the sculptures of disabled people led to those we are looking at today. His transsexuals also ask basic biological questions, he says. After all, every embryo starts out female. “It’s the whack of testosterone that makes the clitoris turn into a penis. So that’s the weird thing. We’re like, ‘How strange’ but every boy’s done it!”

Allanah Starr has arrived at the studio to see her sculpture for the first time. As we walk up from the basement, I ask Quinn if he has shown his two young children the sculptures. “No, I don’t think it’s a good idea for a bit…” He smiles. His 19-year-old daughter likes them. “See, 19-year-olds are more sophisticated than when we were 19,” says Quinn, who is 46. “Because of the internet, people know more than they did 25 years ago.”

Starr is a formidable woman; elegant, sexy and smart. Only her lips look as if they’ve had too much work done. She is here with her tiny, elderly Cuban mother who lives in Miami. Starr talks in a sultry, singsong voice, while her mother smiles sweetly to compensate for her lack of English. First, they visit the sculpture of her and Buck naked holding hands. “Amaaaaazing,” Starr says. “Oh my God, I didn’t realise they’d be in bronze. Incredible.” Then the four of us are face to face with the more explicit work. Starr’s mother walks round, inspecting it closely. “It’s so beautiful,” she says gently.

“The genitals, are they there?” Starr asks Quinn. He nods. We get on our knees to look, diffidently feeling our way along the sculpture until we find an erect penis. “Oh yes! They are!” she shouts with delight. It’s strange how close the world of high art can be to that of Eurotrash. “I like the idea that you have to lie on the floor to see them. Hopefully at the gallery people will be lying on the floor, too,” Quinn says.

I ask Starr what her mum thought about the sex change. “Oh, my mother’s really open-minded, really liberal.” Did it cause any problems when she went into the pornography industry? She translates the question and answers for her mother, who smiles beatifically. “No, it’s Allanah’s life. She has to do what she wants.”

Starr has incredible greeny-brown eyes. Are they natural? “Oh yes – that’s the only thing left. Hahahaha!” She pauses. “Well, except the penis.” Starr, 35, started cross-dressing in her late teens. She just didn’t feel right as a man. She’s had 55 operations, including six on her nose and six on her breasts. What are her plans for the future? “I’m just going to continue getting more surgery.” She grins. Would she ever get rid of her penis? Quinn says she would lose her USP if she did, and she nods. But there are other considerations, aren’t there, such as having a family? “I don’t want children,” she says. “Maybe when I’m older I will have it removed to normalise myself for old age.”

Across the room are sculptures of Michael Jackson’s head and hand. Jackson had agreed to model for Quinn, but died before he made it to the studio. The sculptures are based on paintings. Is the hand a separate sculpture because his glove became so iconic? Oh no, Quinn says, it’s an allusion to the sculpted head and hand of Constantine the Great at Rome’s Musei Capitolini. Quinn studied art history at Cambridge University. “I love ancient art. As an artist, I think you’re influenced by absolutely everything you see. You just suck it all in, then out comes something else.”

What does come out is incredibly diverse. As we move towards the next new piece of work, we pass a sculpture of a prisoner being tortured at Abu Ghraib, part inspired by Goya’s crucifixion, a contorted Kate Moss with her legs over her head, phallic, psychedelic flower gardens – “Drugs for people who don’t take drugs, like myself, or porn pictures your mum can look at,” Quinn says.

He shows me a painting of Buck Angel when he was a girl. She was broad-shouldered, big-boned and extremely pretty. Angel, who is in Holland when I speak to him, laughs uneasily when I say the word pretty. “I guess you could say that – I don’t really know. I modelled for a little while, but I wasn’t your average fashion model, that’s for sure. They had to pose me like a mannequin because I didn’t have that femaleness about me. I just couldn’t be comfortable in my body. I damped down those feelings by drinking a lot and doing drugs through my early teens. I always knew I wanted to be a guy.” Did he think he’d do something about it? “No… Transgender is huge now, but when I was young, there was no knowledge of being able to have a sex change.” He (as a she) had relationships with women but didn’t identify as a lesbian. He didn’t really identify with anybody or anything. He was suicidal. “My parents just assumed I was a gay woman. They weren’t happy with that because of the stigma of having a gay daughter.”

Fifteen years ago, at 28, he had a sex change. He had only one operation – on his chest – and the rest was achieved through testosterone injections. How would he describe himself now? “A pretty buff, macho kind of guy,” he says in a voice that is still a little high-pitched. When Angel changed sex, he lost most of his friends – mainly lesbians who regarded him as a gender traitor. All in all, though, he says, things couldn’t be better. “I now love my life and love being in my body.” His relationship with his parents is also different. “They treat me like their son. I have totally reconnected with my family.” Why does he think that has happened? “Because I am happy with myself, and really that’s all your parents want.”

Sexuality is such a strange thing, he says. As a woman he was a confirmed lesbian. As a man, he now often sleeps with men. But that is largely in a professional capacity. “For business purposes, the majority of my customer base happens to be gay men, and they don’t really want to see me with gay women.” To complicate issues further, Buck is married to a woman, the tattoo artist Elayne Angel.

He says he’s 100% comfortable with his body these days – if he weren’t, he would not have allowed Quinn to sculpt him. Does he not want a proper penis (he has an embryonic one – the result of the testosterone)? No, that’s the funny thing, he says, he’d always thought the point of a sex change was to own a penis, but over time he’s come to regard male genitals as merely symbolic or cosmetic. “What’s the point of having a penis that is not fully functioning and does not even really look like one? Also, there’s a chance of losing your orgasms, and that was the deciding factor for me. For me, I am a man and that’s what I’m trying to say to the world – my genitals do not define me.”

The sculpture of Chelsea Charms is lifesize and disarmingly small. She is virtually all bosom. What interested Quinn was the fact that, apart from her breasts, she has had no plastic surgery. “With these absurdly huge breasts and a totally natural face, she is like a hallucination.” Does he find her beautiful? “It’s a different kind of beauty. It’s so classical, in a way – like a Venus of Willendorf come to life.”

Chelsea Charms and Pamela Anderson seem to be cut from the same silicone-enhanced cloth. But for Quinn, the actor has rebuilt herself in a different way. While Charms has gone beyond the boundaries of convention, he says Anderson has adapted herself within social norms. “What Pamela has done is use surgery and transformation within the mainstream cultural context, whereas everyone else in the show has struck out on their own.”

When I contact her to see what she thinks of the project, Anderson sends me an email declaring her love for Quinn and his work. “I didn’t even ask what he wanted to do with me. I would have done anything.” What does she think of the final piece? “I like that it’s raw. Not perfect. I think that’s what makes it interesting. Sexy isn’t perfect.”

Around the corner is a bust of the Catman, formerly known as Dennis Abner of San Diego, a man who went to extremes to express his inner feline. “He comes much more from the touring display tradition,” Quinn says. “He works with Ripley’s Believe It Or Not! He’s much more a performer and this has less to do with his sense of self. I think.”

I’m staring at Chelsea Charms’s breasts. It’s hard not to. People are bound to call this project a freak show, aren’t they? “It’s not a freak show,” he protests. He sounds upset. “That’s what someone who’s a complete idiot might think, but it’s actually a very human show. It’s not about freakness, it’s about humanity.” I think it’s about both.

He knows he’ll get those headlines, though, doesn’t he? “I don’t care. I think they are extremes of how people live now, and you look at those very tabloids that will say they are freaks, and this is the fodder of those papers.”

We’re sitting in the studio, drinking tea and talking acceptance. A few yards away is the painting of Buck Angel as the beautiful girl he once was. Angel had told me that the moment he realised his parents had finally embraced him was when he won transsexual performer of the year. “I rang up my dad and he said, ‘Wow, that’s great – I have a son who’s a porn star!’ And I thought, ‘How could I ask for any more?'” Now, he says, he’s moving away from pornography into education. “I’m speaking at universities. I really love doing my sex work, but it’s kind of put a stop to people taking me seriously as an educationalist because people have such a weird thing about the sex industry and people who work in it, as if we don’t have a voice that’s capable of going beyond sex work.”

Starr’s mother says she is delighted Allanah has found herself. Occasionally, she is aware of people staring at her daughter as they walk down the street. It outrages her. Some people are so quick to judge. “So I just stare back at them,” she says.

Michael Jackson, Pamela Anderson, Buck and Allanah, Thomas Beatie, Catman, Chelsea Charms – all of them are human works of art, Quinn says. Yes, he has made the works that will fill the gallery, but the originals were sculpted by themselves and their surgeons. “All art should be of the moment, with something eternal about it as well.” He looks over at the sculptures. “I like the idea that if you left them in the desert and somebody found them in 5,000 years, it would probably tell them something about the society we live in now.”

What would this show tell future generations? He smiles. “About the possibility of transformation. About how people could make their own worlds. Buck’s genes say he should be a girl, but he’s decided he doesn’t want to be. It’s culture triumphing over biology.”
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source: marcquinn

Marc Quinn is one of the leading artists of his generation. His sculptures, paintings and drawings explore the relationship between art and science, the human body and the perception of beauty, among other things. Quinn came to prominence in 1991 with his sculpture Self (1991); a cast of the artist’s head made from eight pints of his own frozen blood. Other critically acclaimed works include Alison Lapper Pregnant (2005), a fifteen-ton marble statue of Alison Lapper – a pregnant disabled woman – exhibited on the fourth plinth at Trafalgar Square in London, and Siren (2008) a solid gold sculpture of the model Kate Moss that was on display at The British Museum, London. He has shown internationally in museums and galleries including Tate Gallery, London (1995), Fondazione Prada, Milan (2000), Institut Océanographique, Monaco (2012) and Fondazioni Georgio Cini (2013). A solo exhibition of new works is currently on show at White Cube, Hong Kong. Throughout his oeuvre, Quinn draws on ideas and themes relating to the human body. Other key subjects include cycles of growth and evolution through topical issues such as genetics and the manipulation of DNA, as well as issues of life and death and identity. Quinn’s work uses a broad range of materials, both traditional and untraditional. The materiality of the object, in both its elemental composition and surface appearance, is at the heart of Quinn’s work.
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source: sp-arte

Nascido em Londres, em 1964, Marc Quinn estudou História da Arte no Robinson College em Cambridge. Descoberto nos anos 90 ele é considerado um dos artistas contemporâneos mais conhecidos internacionalmente.
Conhecido por seu uso inovador de materiais incluindo o gelo, sangue, fezes. Marc Quinn mostra através de suas obras uma preocupação com a mutabilidade do corpo e os dualismos que definem a vida humana: espiritual e superfície; física e profundidade;cerebral e sexual. Desenvolve esse paradoxo trabalhos conceituais que são em sua maioria de forma figurativa.
As flores têm sido um objeto central na prática de Marc Quinn por muitos anos que tem influência na tradição de pintura de natureza morta a partir do Renascimento. O trabalho reúne flores e plantas de diferentes continentes que não florescem no mesmo tempo e no mesmo lugar.
Marc Quinn expôs em várias exposições internacionais incluindo Tate Gallery em Londres (1995), Victoria and Albert Museum em Londres (2001), Tate Liverpool (2002), Bienal de Veneza (2003), Fondazione Prada em Milão (2000).
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source: omanutilikeblogspot

מרק קווין ( – 1964) הוא אמן בריטי עכשווי המשויך לקבוצת ‘האמנים הבריטיים הצעירים’ (YBA) הידועה, שאופיינה בתחילת שנות ה – 90 של המאה – 20. מרק קווין התפרסם ביצירת פסלים פרובוקטיביים, תוך שימוש בטכנולוגיות מדעיות מתקדמות. הפסל המפורסם ביותר שלו משנת 1990 הוא “עצמי”. הפסל הוא ראשו של מרק קווין עשוי מהדם שלו, שנשאב במשך חמישה חודשים והוקפא בתבנית סיליקון. בהמשך, יצר קווין פסלי שיש של אנשים קטועי ידיים ורגליים, וכן גינת פרחים יפייפיה שיצר בשנת 2000 עבור דונטלה ורסאצ’ה המורכבת מפרחים קפואים שבטבע לא היו יכולים לצמוח אחד ליד השני. בשנת 2006 יצר מרק קוויין סדרת פסלי ברונזה של קייט מוס בתנוחות יוגה שונות, המכונה ‘ספינקס’. מרק קווין הוא אחד מרשימה ארוכה של אמנים בריטיים עכשוןיים שהשתמשו בקייט מוס כמקור להשראה, הכוללת את בנוסף את לוסיאן פרויד, ג’וליאן אופי, גרי היום, ועוד ועוד. עניין זה קרוב לוודאי ישמש כנושא מחקר לעבודות רבות, שיעסקו במשיכה החזקה שיש לאמנים הבריטיים לדמותה של קייט מוס. בכל מקרה, לדעתי פסלי היוגה של קייט מוס הם מבריקים, ויוצרים חיבור מרתק בין היומיומי, הרוחני, הפיזי, והבלתי מושג. בשנת 2008 יצר מרק קווין גרסה לפסל היוגה של קייט מוס עשוי מזהב טהור לה קרא ‘סירן’.
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source: geometriaru

Он сделал 3D-автопортрет из 5 литров собственной замороженной крови и назвал это искусством. Пожалуй, этой фразой можно описать все, что знают о Марке Куинне многие «ценители», которые пробегаются глазами по рубрике «Культура» в СМИ.

Однако, за два десятка лет работы у скульптора появилось множество других, не менее скандальных и социально-острых произведений.

The Selfish Gene 2007 Sculpture Patinated bronze 44h x 156w x 74d cms
«Искусство помимо прочего еще и средство коммуникации. Оно должно быть массовым, как кино или мода. Современные художники часто принижают публику, требуя от нее образованности для понимания своих работ. А я убежден, что искусство должно вызывать чувства, а умение чувствовать не зависит от уровня знаний» – говорит Куинн.

The Way of all Flesh 2013 Painting Oil on canvas 249.5h x 539w cms
Художник Марк Куинн изобразил 29-летнюю Лару Стоун обнаженной, лежащей посреди кусков кроваво-красного мяса, а из всей одежды на ней – лишь обручальные кольца и один бриллиант. Светлые волосы супермодели свободно ниспадают на плечи, а на ее скулах отражаются солнечные лучи. Судя по всему, Стоун осталась довольна конечным результатом, так как выложила на всеобщее обозрение в Твиттер фрагмент картины.
Марк Куинн уже не первый раз работает с супермоделями – в 2008 году он подарил Британскому музею золотую статую Кейт Мосс. 50-килограммовая статуя британской модели в позе йоги стоит 1,5 миллиона фунтов стерлингов и является крупнейший золотой статуей в мире со времен Древнего Египта.

Творчество Марка Куинна следует понимать как искусство «воплощения», направленное на природу человека.

Марк Куинн приобрел известность в 1990-е и вошел в арт-группировку молодых британских художников, получившую название YBA (Young British Artists). В это художественное сообщество также включены Дэмиен Херст, Джейк и Динос Чепмены, Трейси Эмин и другие знаменитые деятели искусства. Марк Куинн не отстает от них — сейчас он один из самых влиятельных и дорогостоящих английских скульпторов.

Вопрос жизни и смерти в работах Марка Куинна предстает наболевшим. Он рисует по фотографиям цветы, которые умерли у него на глазах, воспроизводит окружающий мир в разных материалах, даря ему бессмертие, придавая значение всему, что должно умереть.
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source: centrodeartigos

Marc Quinn es un artista británico y uno de un grupo informal conocido como los Young British Artists. Él es conocido por Alison Lapper embarazada, Self, and Garden.
Quinn ha utilizado la sangre, el hielo y las heces para hacer esculturas, y su trabajo a veces se refiere a la evolución científica. Quinn obra muestra una preocupación por la mutabilidad del cuerpo y los dualismos que definen la vida humana: física y espiritual, superficie y profundidad, cerebral y sexual.
Vida y carrera

Quinn nació en Londres en 1964 – Estudió historia y la historia del arte en el Robinson College, Cambridge. Trabajó como asistente del escultor Barry Flanagan. Quinn comenzó a exponer a principios de 1990. Fue el primer artista representado por Jay Jopling, y se exhibió en la sensación de Charles Saatchi.
Quinn ha expuesto exposiciones incluyendo Sonsbeek 93, Arnhem, Dar y Recibir, Victoria and Albert Museum, Londres, Declaraciones 7, 50a Bienal de Venecia y la Bienal de Gwangju. Exposiciones individuales incluyen Tate Gallery, Londres, Kunstverein Hannover, Fondazione Prada, Milan, Tate Liverpool, el Museo Irlandés de Arte Moderno de Dublín, Groninger Museum, Groningen y MACRO, Roma, DHC/ART Fundación para lart contemporain, Montral y Fondation Beyeler, de Basilea.
La práctica artística

Quinns esculturas, pinturas y dibujos tratan a menudo con la relación distanciada que tenemos con nuestros cuerpos, destacando cómo el conflicto entre lo natural y cultural tiene un control sobre la psique contemporánea. En 1999, Quinn comenzó una serie de esculturas de mármol de amputados como una forma de volver a la lectura de las aspiraciones de la estatuaria griega y romana y sus representaciones de un todo ideal.