Michael Clark

マイケル·クラーク·カンパニー

Come, been and gone

Michael Clark   Come, been and gone

source: michaelclarkcompany

Michael Clark Company’s critically acclaimed production come, been and gone is made primarily to the music of David Bowie and opens with a revival of Swamp, first created in 1986, set to music by Bruce Gilbert and Wire.

“Rock is my rock. It has been vital to me at a personal level; it has shaped me as an individual as well as an artist”
Michael Clark

Michael Clark chose to become a choreographer believing that actions speak louder than words. He creates work which combines his classical integrity with a more complex, contemporary sensibility embracing virtue and vice, abandon and control, grace and embarrassment. He is renowned for his legendary collaborations with bands, fashion designers and visual artists including Wire, Bodymap, Leigh Bowery, Trojan and Sarah Lucas.

The costumes are by Stevie Stewart, with lighting by Charles Atlas..
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source: mcachicagoorg

Ballet meets punk, and neither comes out the same. In its highly anticipated first visit to Chicago, the electrifying Michael Clark Company provocatively pays homage to the decadence and unbridled fun of 1970s club culture. British dance iconoclast Michael Clark sets his choreography in come, been and gone to the music of fellow rebel David Bowie, and collaborates with video artist and dance film pioneer Charles Atlas.

Clark’s dancers don Bowie-style leather jackets and echo his unique body language, building up to a detonation of jumps and kicks. come, been and gone pulls off a remarkable feat—matching the cool, alien beauty of the singular singer, who makes a cameo appearance here thanks to 1977 film footage of his track “Heroes.”
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source: theguardian
Michael Clark, choreographer, ex-heroin addict, and pin-up boy of the 1980s Blitz kids, is 50 next year. And while his work continues to develop and refine within the abstract micro-sector that he has made his own, his deep subject remains himself and his life. Last week, in the colossal emptiness of Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall, he presented th, a 10-piece programme set to songs by David Bowie, Kraftwerk, Pulp and others. These were performed by his loyal gang of professional dancers, and by a chorus of four dozen amateurs.
The professionals are sleek in Stevie Stewart’s black and white all-in-ones, and later dramatic in black and silver. As the music rolls from the speakers, and Charles Atlas’s icy lighting picks them out from on high, they map out the 50-yard floor space with Clarke’s wary, hyper-reductive steps. All the familiar tropes are here: the nodding-dog heads, the tight couronne arms, the karate-stiff hands, the banking turns. There’s no amplitude, no curved line, no surrender to the music’s sweep and billow. But then it’s the very narrowness of the bandwidth to which Clark confines himself that gives the work its intensity, and there’s a humming interplay between his stark choreographic glyphs and the airy vastness of the hall.
There’s a relaxing of tension at the end, as Kate Coyne and Oxana Panchenko punch out the opening riffs of Bowie’s “The Jean Genie” with stabbing little prances on pointe, and the other dancers swing into the number’s sexy mannequin strut, but the main impression is of an artist endlessly reworking the same material in the hope of resolution, and perhaps redemption. For me, numbers like “Aladdin Sane”, with their repetitive circuits and overwound toy dynamics, find a parallel in the scratchy self-portraits and neon epigrams of Tracey Emin. There’s the same introversion, the same codifying of personal experience, the same close-focused search for meaning. A delicate, momentarily-held frieze of dancers at the end of Funkadelic’s “Maggot Brain” is almost painful in its vulnerability, its blink-and-you-miss-it beauty.
Which is not to say that Clark doesn’t respond to the Vatican-like scale of the place. Deploying his dancers at the greatest possible distance from one another, he plays stylish perspective tricks. Here’s Benjamin Warbis, inches from the audience, performing a slow développé. And there, high on the walkway, so far away they don’t seem to be part of the same event, are the others, stretching and throwing shapes against the darkness. Clark usually appears in his own programmes, if only for fleeting, Hitchcockian moments, as if to emphasise their autobiographical subtext. And there he is, as Bowie mugs to “Heroes” on a screen, all but invisible in a dark hoodie on the floor.
The chorus is a nice touch. Of all ages, visibly thrilled to be taking part, they advance and retreat in waves, dressed in Monty Pythonesque towelling tunics. Sometimes they lie down, legs paddling, pinned to the floor like great black moths. And if it’s clear that not all of them could do the steps blindfold, their tentativeness is very human, and highlights the fluency, accomplishment and all-round otherness of the dancers.
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source: serralvespt
A Companhia de Michael Clark iniciou a sua actividade em 1984, com dois projectos: Do You Me? I Did e New Puritans. A Companhia tornou-se um sucesso imediato e viajou por todo o mundo apresentando Not H. air (1984) e Our Caca Phoney H. Our Caca Phoney H (1985). Através de colaborações com designers de moda Bodymap, Leigh Bowery e com o artista Trojan, Clark trouxe um elemento visual enriquecedor ao seu trabalho. O uso de música contemporânea e a integração de bandas como The Fall, Laibach e Wire expandiram quer o seu trabalho quer o seu público. No decorrer deste período, Clark desenvolveu trabalhos únicos, de grande escala para a sua companhia: No Fire Escape in Hell (1986), Because We Must (1987) e I Am Curious Orange (1988). Estes trabalhos foram apresentados em sessões esgotadas no Sadler’s Wells Theatre, em Londres e internacionalmente. Adicionalmente, a sua contribuição para companhias de dança de maior dimensão inclui projectos como Le French Revolting (1984) para G.R.C.O.P., Angel Food (1985) para a Ópera de Paris, Hail The Classical (1985) para o Ballet Escocês, Drop Your Pearls and Hog It, Girl (1986) para o London Festival Ballet, Swamp (1986) para o Ballet Rambert, Rights (1989) para a Phoenix Dance Company e Bog 3.0 (1992) para a Deutsche Oper Berlin.
“Durante quase 25 anos, Michael Clark tem vindo a redefinir a natureza e os limites da dança contemporânea. A sua coreografia perversamente prodigiosa e anárquica e a encenação escarnecida das suas performances vieram radicalizar a relação da dança consigo mesma e com o seu público. A chave do seu trabalho consiste na abertura às possibilidades consagradas pela música e pelas artes visuais. O conjunto de coreografias rigorosamente controladas e a música vibrante e pulsante é uma parte do modo como Clark trabalha com o vocabulário formal da dança clássica, reestruturando-o de fora através de um bombardeamento quase sensorial. A sua abordagem é cacófona, uma confusão explorada, uma contaminação visual e uma ruptura. O seu trabalho é igualmente rigoroso e magistral, sugerindo uma manobra palpável do seu meio, de uma forma que vai para além do puro movimento para envolver uma plasticidade extensa.” Suzanne Cotter.
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source: kochi-bunkazaidanorjp
Michael Clark /マイケル・クラーク プロフィール
スコットランド出身のマイケル・クラークは1975年 から1979年までロンドンのロイヤル・バレエ・スクールで学んだ後、1979年、ランバートバレエ団に所属し、リチャード・オールストンとともに活動する。彼の振付による初演は1982年、自身がレジデンスしていたロンドンのリバーサイドスタジオで行われ、その後、1984年までに16のオリジナル作品を発表している。1984年、マイケル・クラーク・カンパニー創立。創立後、カンパニーは即座に成功し海外ツアーを行うに至る。この期間に、ファッションデザイナーのボディーマップ、アーティストのレイ・ボウリーやトロージャン、また、ザ・フォール、ライバハ、ワイヤーといったバンドとも共同制作を行う。 2005年、クラークはバービカン・センター(ロンドン)の芸術共同経営者となる。2010年、カンパニーはテート・モダン(ロンドン)で2年間のプロジェクトに取り掛かり、2011年6月、タービンホールにて大規模な新作‘th’の発表を行った。2011年、クラークはその振付とダンス分野における目覚ましい功績を称してロバート・ゴードン大学から芸術名誉学位を与えられた。
マイケル・クラーク・カンパニー