PAULA HAYES

Паула Хейс
ポーラ·ヘイズ
保拉·海斯

terrarium

source: paulahayes

American born in 1958, Paula Hayes received an MFA from Parsons School of Design in NYC in 1989 and a BS from Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY in 1987.

For two decades Ms. Hayes has melded her interest in Art and Landscape Design into a unique practice that straddles the realms of art, design, landscape design, domestic and garden products and artist books. Since 2000, Ms. Hayes has designed many private residential landscapes for clients such as Marianne Boesky, Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn and Nicholas Rohatyn, Rafael and Diana Viñoly, David and Monica Zwirner, Mickey and Jeanne Klein, Andrea Rosen and Jill Stuart and Ron Curtis, to name a few.

Public landscapes Ms. Hayes has designed include The Howard Hughes Medical Research Campus in Virginia, the W Hotel South Beach, Florida and the Hauser and Wirth Gallery in NYC. Ms. Hayes has had an acclaimed exhibition in the lobby of MoMA in NYC, and a multi-faceted exhibition at the Tang Museum in Saratoga Springs. In the fall of 2011 Ms. Hayes had an exhibition at the Wexner Art Center in Columbus, Ohio and Lever House in NYC. A highly abbreviated list of collectors of Ms. Hayes’s work include: Aby Rosen, Alberto Mugrabi, David Zwirner, Jeanne Greenberg Rohatyn, Marianne Boesky, and Daniel and Margaret Loeb. Over the last 20 years Ms. Hayes has exhibited at The Fawbush Gallery, Salon 94, Marianne Boesky Gallery (all in NYC); MoCA, LA; the Schauffhausen Museum in Shauffhausen, Switzerland; Galerie fur Landscaftkunst in Hamburg, Germany; The Patricia Low Galerie in Gstaad, Switzerland; and Eigen and Art in Berlin, Germany to name but a few.

Ms. Hayes has been nominated for a Cooper Hewitt Design Award in Landscape Design in 2009, and in Landscape Architecture and Design Mind in 2011. She has design patents registered for 3 of her products in the US, the EU and Canada, awarded in 2010 and 2011.
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source: paulahayes

The Lilliputian worlds within each Living Terrarium remain open to the air through one small opening allowing each hand-blown container to be filled with intricate tiny, living plants. The collaborative spirit is at the core of this living work, through its engineering, fabrication and eventual care-taking encouraging a devotional relationship between the caretaker, vessel, and its contents.
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source: wexartsorg

New York-based landscape designer and artist Paula Hayes works with plant life and minerals to produce stunning terrariums as sculptures for gallery environments.

Hayes’s work crafts industrial materials—such as hand-blown glass, silicone, or cast acrylic—into organic shapes that she then fills with a rich variety of plant life. These works deftly combine the intricate beauty and care required of the plant life with innovative, willfully independent sculptural forms. Her one-gallery exhibition at the Wexner Center will feature eight to ten pieces, juxtaposing older works alongside new projects created specifically for this show. In keeping with Hayes’s commitment to the caretaking of these living sculptures, the plants will be tended by select Ohio State University students during gallery hours.
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source: nytimes

PAULA HAYES likes collisions, particularly those involving meteors, because they give birth to crystals, structures she’s enthusiastic about right now. “Meteors! Dynamism! What’s not to love?” she’ll tell you excitedly, pointing to the heat of their impact as the “miraculous transmutation of life.” One bright morning recently, Ms. Hayes patted the glittering quartz landscape of a section of her tiny Brooklyn garden into which were tucked soft, blobby silicone planters no bigger than a child’s hand and filled with begonias. “Living room necklaces” — little webs of crocheted fishing line designed by Ms. Hayes — curled down from a Japanese maple; some of their pockets were filled with bromeliads, spiky water-hoarding epiphytes that looked like alien pets. You wanted to lie down and peer through the underbrush, in case a critter was lurking there.

“I wanted to make the garden magical and hopeful,” said Ms. Hayes, 50, whose fantastical herbaceous art pieces like hand-blown terrariums have made her an art-world darling. “A healing place that’s part of our story. The other thing I was after is this idea of visitation. You know, aliens.”

“I was pretty much married to my work,” said Ms. Hayes, the daughter of farmers from Fonda, N.Y. (population 810), who took her master’s degree in sculpture at Parsons in the late ’80s and supported herself by working as a gardener. By the late ’90s, sculpture and gardens had merged in her brain, she said. She created her signature planters — soft and biomorphic silicone pouches that gentle a plant’s root ball — and Plantpacks, designed to be worn on the chest like BabyBjorns for asparagus ferns. “Like motherhood,” she said. “Love on the go!” Since then, her down-the-rabbit-hole environments — and Ms. Hayes’s “nurturing spirit,” in the words of William T. Georgis, an architect with whom she has collaborated on a few rarefied Hamptons properties — have kept her an unlikely art star for over a decade; unlikely because her deeply personal, ephemeral and handmade worlds have told a markedly different story from the identity politics, nihilism and cultural commentary of many of her art world peers. This year is typically robust: Ms. Hayes was nominated for a Cooper-Hewitt National Design Award, a huge honor, though another firm took the prize. Next Thursday, she has a show opening at the Marianne Boesky Gallery in Chelsea. It includes six giant terrariums, a beguilingly beautiful animated film about an extraterrestrial gardener that is a collaboration between Ms. Hayes and Mr. Camporeale, and a rooftop garden.
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source: artnews

“The thought that the smallest things that we think are nothing or disgusting, which are part of our natural world, are performing these miracles resonates with me poetically,” says Hayes. She cast the organic shapes large-scale in milky acrylic to create two translucent, radiant sculptures—a 15-foot-long, wall-mounted horizontal piece titled Slug and a 13-foot-tall floor-to-ceiling piece titled Egg, each lit from within and host to a lush universe of plant life.

Temkin admits she would not have made the leap from A to B after watching the video of the slugs. “I don’t know if the average viewer would have identified it as a romance, but there was a kind of dance in the exchange between the freestanding egg and the wall-relief slug that transformed the lobby from a space of neutral emotions, at best, to one of joyful experience,” says Temkin of the show, which was titled “Nocturne of the Limax maximus.”

“Paula doesn’t want art to be something you need background information on to get a lot out of,” Temkin adds. “It’s not just the varieties of plant life; it’s also her crystals and shells and all these treasure-like elements that go into the containers that do create a magical, fairy-tale environment. Everybody has an appetite for the promise of an imaginary place full of sparkle and color and texture—and that’s growing.”

The populist aspect is essential to Hayes, who considers herself a maker of living artworks that inspire happiness. These range from tabletop terrariums with miniature edens cultivated in handblown glass containers, to residential gardens sculpted with playful, squishy planters and landscaping accessories she designed herself, to museum and gallery installations that often look like friendly visitations from another planet.

“Probably the most radical aspect of my work is that it can die and requires maintenance continually,” Hayes says. She is committed to a lifelong relationship with each of her living artworks and will make house calls or send surrogates for upkeep as needed. “The person who’s collected it can never really own it and is more of its caretaker,” she says of each work. For those who insist on keeping their terrariums in rooms without light, Hayes may suggest swapping plants for a glittery landscape of crystals and minerals. Hayes comes from a family of original thinkers. She spent her early youth in Westborough, Massachusetts, with her mother and grandparents. Her grandfather was an inventor with several patents to his credit, including one for a part that made pump sprayers more effective. “I just loved that my grandfather was an inventor,” says Hayes, whose favorite spot was his workshop. “It was always this goal of mine to patent something.”

She met that goal in 2010, when she was awarded a patent for her “dumpling planter,” a pouch made of rubber waterproofing membrane, with an internal drainage system, that cinches looser or tighter at the top as needed around a plant or a tree and has the pleasing appearance of a dumpling. Hayes received a second patent for her “garden necklace,” a braided rubber rope used to shape and hem arrangements in planted areas. Both inventions are part of her flexible and lightweight roofing system, which also includes hexagonal, pond, and silicone planters that can be grouped together in various configurations to create a green environment in black-tar urban spaces.

Hayes’s life changed after one of her professors gave her a catalogue of Louise Bourgeois’s sculpture. Hayes felt so strong a connection to Bourgeois’s organic forms charged with sexuality and personal narrative that she impulsively phoned the septuagenarian artist, and was invited to pay her a visit in New York. Having navigated the unfamiliar city to Bourgeois’s Chelsea townhouse, she found the artist waiting in the vestibule. “I showed her my slides, and she thought about it and said, ‘You’re a natural-born artist, but you’re very naive,’” Hayes recalls. “‘I think you should move to New York City and you will not be naive.’ And I said, ‘Okay!’”

Hayes immediately applied to Parsons for graduate school and was soon commuting between New York and Saratoga Springs, where her children were living with her ex-husband. She also started working as a gardener, taking care of plantings on rooftops and in office-building lobbies to support herself and her children. Throughout her time at Parsons—she graduated in 1989—and through the following decade, Hayes made loose, ephemeral assemblages of found objects, fabrics, branches and leaves, and delicate Chinese and Japanese papers on which she inscribed references to writers who had inspired her, including Emily Dickinson and D. H. Lawrence.

Hayes had her first solo exhibition at New York’s Fawbush Gallery in 1992, and she continued to show her wall and floor assemblages throughout the 1990s while still working as a gardener. But at a certain point, she began to lose interest in exhibiting her art. “The gardening was just so completely satisfying—it had everything in it that I was loving about art making,” she says. She wanted to design her own gardens.

“I didn’t want to see another classically shaped or square pot,” Hayes says. In 1999, using translucent silicone, she designed a new kind of planter that could stretch and shift like a womb as the plant inside grew. Boesky bought the first one and in 2000 commissioned Hayes to design a rooftop garden for her place in Tribeca. Hayes was launched on a new—art—career.
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source: comfortbg

Когато говорим за аксесоарите в интериора, ключовата дума неизменно бива „креативност“. Това е и думата, която най-добре описва американската дизайнерка Паула Хейс (Paula Hayes), чиято идея за авангардна декорация на дома и градината определено се отличава на общия фон.

Дизайнерката разработва различни типове аксесоари, като най-силно се отличават нейните градински контейнери за растения и нейните декоративни терариуми за украса. Нейната работа е типичен пример за изкуство, пренесло любовта на своя автор към природата в реалния живот. Основните материали, с които работи Хайнс са кристал, акрил и силикон.
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source: artspycn

以纽约为创作基地的保拉·海斯(Paula Hayes)是一位景观设计师兼活体艺术的创作者。使用吹制玻璃、硅树脂或是浇铸有机玻璃等材料制作外壳,海斯创作出了一些精致的小盆栽,它们将在城市生活的人们与自然的魅力联系在一起,同时表现出了我们对拥有并控制自然的渴望。近日,海斯的个展在俄亥俄州哥伦布Wexner艺术中心开幕,来自《AT》的Amanda Mccuaig就展览对海斯进行了简单的访问。

我作品的中心在于不夸张的、实实在在的奉献与关心。它们在经过精心地制作之后的确非常漂亮,能够很好地展示我的投入。很多时候我觉得我就像是一个教育家一样,能够在某些事物还不那么美好,需要时间和耐心来修复某种情况、或是来寻找能让它们变得快乐美丽的因素时持续培养它们。

我致力于以一种非常实在的方式将“关心”这一行为与艺术联系到一起,同时也试图将关爱生活的乐趣与对一个人性社会来说美丽的、价值无限的、必需的东西联系在一起。

有100件小型“盆景”,可以直接拿在手上的那种,它们都安置在一片用回收利用的橡胶做成的地形上,这是特别为Wexner画廊创作的;还有8件更大一点的“盆景”,它们大概生长了7年左右;有一件名“Egg”的作品直接连接了地板与天花板,一件名“Iceburg Pedestal”的大型“盆景”被安置在了一个基座上,另外还有两件“水晶盆景”。所以总共有112件作品展出,它们被放置在了不同的位置,每一部分都有自己的照明设备,这也是我设计的。