QUAYOLA

captives

QUAYOLA  CAPTIVES 2

source: highlike
About Quayola Quayola is a visual artist based in London. He investigates dialogues and the unpredictable collisions, tensions and equilibriums between the real and artificial, the figurative and abstract, the old and new. His work explores photography, geometry, time-based digital sculptures and immersive audiovisual installations and performances. Quayola’s work has been exhibited at the Venice Biennale; Victoria & Albert Museum, London; British Film Institute, London; Park Ave Armory, New York; La Gaite Lyrique, Paris; MNAC, Barcelona; Grand Theatre, Bordeaux; Palais des Beaux Arts, Lille; Paco Das Artes, Sao Paulo; Triennale, Milan; Sonar Festival, Barcelona; Elekra Festival, Montreal and Clermont Ferrand Film Festival. — About the work Captives: Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures, a contemporary interpretation of Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”. The work explores the tension and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. Whilst referencing Renaissance sculptures, the focus of this series shifts from pure figurative representation to the articulation of matter itself. As in the original “Prigioni” the classic figures are left unfinished, documenting the very history of their creation and transformation. Mathematical functions and processes describe computer-generated geological formations that evolve endlessly, morphing into classical figures. Industrial computer-controlled robots sculpt the resulting geometries into life-size “unfinished” sculptures.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: ilikethisartnet
“Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures, a contemporary interpretation of Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”.
The work explores the tension and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. Whilst referencing Renaissance sculptures, the focus of this series shifts from pure figurative representation to the articulation of matter itself. As in the original “Prigioni” the classic figures are left unfinished, documenting the very history of their creation and transformation.
Mathematical functions and processes describe computer-generated geological formations that evolve endlessly, morphing into classical figures. Industrial computer-controlled robots sculpt the resulting geometries into life-size “unfinished” sculptures.”
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: creativeapplications
Captives is an ongoing series of digital and physical sculptures by Quayola and a contemporary homage to Michelangelo’s unfinished series “Prigioni” (1513-1534) and his technique of “non-finito”. The project explores tensions and equilibrium between form and matter, man-made objects of perfection and complex, chaotic forms of nature. In this series mathematical functions and processes describe computer-generated geological formations, endlessly evolving and morphing into classical figures resulting into life-size ‘unfinished’ sculptures. The project is comprised of a number of different iterations, tools and processes. Starting off with the building models of existing sculptures using zBrush, running them through custom vvvv softwares, exporting and finally producing the physical sculptures milled by a robot. The installation also includes animated scenes, rendered using custom software and finally edited for the video installation sequenced across 6 hd screens with each having its own audio channel.
For this project Quayola wanted to use software that would produce immediate feedback and have a realtime response. Since traditional 3d packages tend to cripple the flow, Quayola wanted something where he could have a “conversation” with the model, a bit like a sculptor would have with clay or stone. There is an action and an immediate response.
The software is built using VVVV through a series of custom nodes and DX11 shaders, and integrated in the Dedalo framework CAN covered about few weeks back. The core code for handling the geometry is done by Matt Swoboda and Juliet Vuillet, while all the system and rendering is done by Natan Sinigaglia (within the Dedalo framework). The software itself runs on two machines, the first handling a noise engine, presets and control for all parameters, while the second is handling the actual rendering. The noise engine is used to control all the parameters in the software. Each parameter can be mapped on a given output of the noise engine. The engine does not produces textures but directly works with functions that get compiled into a shader. The volume is based on voxels and excavated with boolean or additive operations. It is meshed with marching cubes, then a series of additional effects are applied on the mesh, like smoothing, tessellation-displacement, mesh-simplifying. A system of metadata in the mesh allows to apply (or not to apply) effects on the figure and/or the volume around it. Finally the render engine is the one of Dedalo. In this case Quayola is using a 3-spot-lights rig with soft shadows and BDRF procedural materials. Almost everything runs on the GPU (nvidia titan) and pretty much realtime (from 30fps to 10fps depending on voxel resolution). The final sculptures that form part of exhibit were milled with ABB robots with rotary platforms. Due to the complexity in geometry, the robots had about 1.2 million lines of instructions to follow (each line has xyz+rotation info for the robot to approach the surface). Quayola tells CAN, this is an unordinary amount of data for a robot to follow. The robot’s tip is mounted with a special HST spindle with a liquid cooler system, running up to 24000rpm and it has been programmed to change its tools automatically, so to optimise milling time. As the robot had to run 24h, ODICO installed an sms system that will directly connect with their mobile to alert if there is a stop/problem.
Quayola describes the project as only the beginning of a process. The exhibition is organised in the same way, as a document of a process with aim to produce various series of videos and sculptures, exploring different geological simulations as well as different figures. Quayola is about to embark on proper scanning session with a dancer to create a set of new figures, so to be the subject of new pieces. Of course, harder synthetic materials or Carrara marble is always on the table, if the budgets permits.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: quayola
Quayola is a visual artist based in London. He investigates dialogues and the unpredictable collisions,
tensions and equilibriums between the real and artificial, the figurative and abstract, the old and
new. His work explores photography, geometry, time-based digital sculptures and immersive
audiovisual installations and performances.
Quayola’s work has been exhibited at the Venice Biennale; Victoria & Albert Museum, London; British
Film Institute, London; Park Ave Armory, New York; La Gaite Lyrique, Paris; MNAC, Barcelona;
Grand Theatre, Bordeaux; Palais des Beaux Arts, Lille; Paco Das Artes, Sao Paulo; Triennale, Milan;
Sonar Festival, Barcelona; Elekra Festival, Montreal and Clermont Ferrand Film Festival.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: mappingfestival
Quayola est un graphiste et artiste multimédia Italien basé à Londres. Son travail vidéos, ses installations, ses performances lives et ses créations graphiques l’ont amené à collaborer avec des artistes comme OneDotZero, Warp, Lumin, D-Fuse, Mira Calix et Lovebytes.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: arteenlared
Davide Quayola es un artista multimedia y diseñador gráfico italiano residente en Londres. El trabajo de Quayola investiga los procesos de transformación de la materia, desde el bloque de piedra a la obra final. Quayola trabaja a partir de una serie de fotografías de la obra original, que él mismo realiza y, posteriormente, con un modelo gráfico de ordenador reconstruye y reinterpreta los volúmenes.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: node-livezymogennet
Quayola è un video artista italiano residente a Londra, dove da anni sperimenta nuovi incontri tra il mondo dell’immagine, del video, della performance live e della fotografia.
Attraverso una conoscenza approfondita delle nuove tecnologie Quayola crea mondi dove l’elemento naturale e architettonico muta costantemente in oggetti visivi effimeri e volatili facendo coesistere il reale e l’artificiale simultaneamente.
L’integrazione di materiale generato su computer con fonti registrate (audio/video) esplora l’ambiguità del realismo nel mondo della realtà digitale.
Con prestigiose esperienze sia in ambito artistico (London Center of Contemporary Art, Elektra, Sonar, Nemo) che in ambito commerciale (Nike, United Visual Artists, Kylie Minogue, Jay Z) Quayola collabora costantemente con artisti visivi, musicisti, graphic designer, animatori e architetti ricercando nuovi punti d’incontro tra diverse discipline.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: lookatme
вырос в Риме — в этом городе тебя всегда окружают древние постройки, и ты не придаешь этому особого значения.
Переехав в Лондон, я смог взглянуть по-новому на эти достопримечательности, отделить их от контекста и сосредоточиться на их визуальных характеристиках.
Тогда я начал работу над серией принтов с изображением
римской церкви в стиле барокко: я фотографировал ее интерьеры, а затем разбивал их на множество элементов, превращая снимки в сложные композиции из полигональных фигур. Это был примерно 2005 год — тогда я начал делать свои серии с церковными витражами, картинами Рубенса и тому подобным. Еще до появления Google Art Project я работал в музее Прадо в Мадриде. И мои работы, и Google Art Project позволяют посмотреть на картину и изучить мельчайшие ее детали, при этом абстрагируясь от ее истории создания и героев. Я использую ту же технологию, что и специалисты Google Art Project — они делают тысячи фотографий, потом совмещают их и стараются добиться максимально четкого изображения. Забавно, что, создавая работы для серии Strata в музее Прадо, я работал с теми двумя картинами, которые первыми были оцифрованы для Google — «Менины» Веласкеса и «Непорочное зачатие» Тьеполо.
Я использую 3D-анимацию или даже роботов, которые создают скульптуры, следуя специальной программе, — безусловно, технологии очень влияют на мои работы,
но в то же время я не могу сказать, что они меня вдохновляют, я интересуюсь совсем другими вещами. Например, когда я делал проект Matter — серию видео, на которых работы Родена постоянно меняют свою текстуру, меня очень вдохновила одна древняя скульптура, часть которой была тщательно отполирована, в то время как другая часть была оставлена необработанной. Этот контраст я попробовал воспроизвести в своих видеоработах. Интерпретируя скульптуру Родена «Мыслитель», я хотел показать процесс, противоположный работе скульптора, — превратить его работу обратно в блок камня. Кроме того, недавно я начал работать и с материальными объектами, а не только с видео. Мои скульптуры созданы с помощью лазерных станков с ЧПУ, но это не значит, что мою работу можно назвать полностью автоматизированной. Конечно, я использую программы, которые трансформируют картины и скульптуры, но это занимает, наверное, 4% моего времени. Остальное время я выбираю необычные ракурсы для съемки, думаю, как лучше интерпретировать ту или иную работу. Это как фотографировать ландшафты — ты можешь потратить недели, чтобы поймать правильный свет.
Мне кажется,
нам сейчас сложно объективно оценить, как именно технологии влияют на нас, потому что они проникают во все области нашей жизни
Вообще из-за цифровых технологий мы смотрим на окружающий мир совсем по-другому: я заметил это, еще когда фотографировал барочную церковь для своих первых принтов. Сами фотографии отделяют изображаемое от реальности, и когда мы рассматриваем картины в Google Art Project, происходит отчуждение от того, на что мы смотрим, и мы начинаем уделять внимание визуальным составляющим произведения, не пытаясь понять композицию в целом или узнать историю создания работы. Тем не менее, мне кажется, нам сейчас сложно объективно оценить, как именно технологии влияют на нас, потому что они проникают во все области нашей жизни, и мы не можем осознать их границы — например, удивительно, насколько финансовая система контролируется машинами. Это касается не только искусства, но и всего вокруг: мы живем в мире, где соседствуют машины, которые думают как люди, и люди, которые начинают думать как машины. Именно поэтому мне кажется, что мы не должны проводить границу между просто искусством и диджитал-артом или видеоартом, потому что такое разделение заставляет нас смотреть на видеоработы или на цифровые работы под особенным углом и думать о технике, но мне кажется, что дискуссия должна сместиться в другую плоскость.
За последнее время было создано столько произведений диджитал-искусства, что сейчас настало самое время, чтобы взглянуть на суть работ. Важно понимать, что технологии всегда толкали искусство вперед: благодаря им художники использовали новые цвета, материалы и так далее. Я верю в прогресс и очень позитивно отношусь к новым разработкам. В то же время я не хочу, чтобы те, кто видят мои работы, думали о технологиях слишком много. Лучше, чтобы они думали о чем-то более важном, чем то, что будет модно в ближайшие два года. В «Тройке» будет несколько работ, которые сделаны пару лет назад, но они не выглядят устаревшими. Я не делаю работы, чтобы использовать какие-то новые изобретения, которые будут необычными в течение короткого промежутка времени. Я не знаю точно, как работают алгоритмы, помогающие создавать мои работы. Есть люди, которым удается это намного лучше, чем мне — например, сотрудникам Pixar, которые действительно расширяют границы технологий.
Что касается интерпретаций классического искусства, то нельзя сказать, что эта идея представляет собой что-то новое: существует длинная традиция таких преобразований, так что мне кажется, что новые технологии не имеют к ней отношения. Пикассо интерпретировал старинные полотна, братья Чепмен купили картину Гойи и переделали ее — можно вспомнить много примеров. Мои работы очень визуальны, очень зрелищны, но я сознательно использую культурное наследие — история добавляет какой-то слой эмоций и смыслов, который заставляет тебя видеть больше, чем изображено на том или ином полотне. Сейчас я вместе с Натанам Синигалия из арт-группы Abstract Birds работаю над новым проектом Partitura — мы пытаемся изобрести новый изобразительный язык и визуализировать музыкальные произведения. Я долгое время работал диджеем, и на меня очень повлияла техно-музыка, но с Натаном мы используем в основном произведения с длинной историей — эти звуки связаны с какими-то старинными традициями, давними обрядами. При этом ты всегда начинаешь с того, что не знаешь ничего о предмете интерпретации — для меня особенно важно, что мы начинаем с абсолютного отчуждения, но, трансформируя работу, привносим в нее нечто новое и важное.