RACHEL FEINSTEIN

РЭЙЧЕЛ ФАЙНШТЕЙН
راشيل فينشتاين
레이첼 파인 스타 인

source: blouinartinfo

For the most part fashion shows are held on stark, white runways that serve one main purpose: to present the clothes to buyers and the press. Sometimes, labels will juxtapose a vibrant background against the looks — Chris Benz included a shimmering gold backdrop at his presentation and Y-3 projected a clear blue sky behind the models. Others hire a marquee name — Chanel’s Karl Lagerfeld called on architect Zaha Hadid — to design an elaborate set.

Marc Jacobs tapped his friend, sculptor Rachel Feinstein, to design what she told Style.com was “a broken castle. Marie Antoinette’s version of ruins,” for his fall/winter 2012 show last night. The breathtakingly immense construction paper scenery, complete with a fountain in the middle of the runway, served as an elegant backdrop for Jacobs’s collection. Subtle blue lighting illuminated the white set, which was rich with texture and depth. Sure, the collection, inspired by eccentric fashion journalists Anna Piaggi and Lynn Yaeger — think pilgrim-style rhinestone-buckle shoes, large furry Dr. Seuss-like hats by Stephen Jones, and lots of holographic embellishments and sparkly trims — was interesting to look at, but the real star of the show was Feinstein’s set.
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source: vogue

Gazing at the odd, surreal set that serves as the backdrop for Marc Jacobs fall 2012 show, which reminds one variously of a collapsing Italian village, or a spooky amusement park, or even a place where a depressed Smurf might vacation, you would swear that the elaborate woodwork and humongous winding path, the ghostly staircases and haunted arches, were in the works for months.

So it comes as a great surprise when the artist Rachel Feinstein, who with Jacobs, dreamed up the whole business, sets the record straight: Two weeks ago, she emailed her friend Marc about something or other that had nothing to do with fashion, she recalls. He asked her to come by and talk about the set for his upcoming show, saying he was thinking about something melancholy, something sad. He had been admiring Feinstein’s sculpture Puritan’s Delight, and he told her, “I’m feeling Puritan—snow, winter, craggy trees, grottos. Mold. Piranesi,” she remembers.

By Friday of that week, Feinstein had created an eighteen-inch model of her ideas, based on buildings she had sourced from references far and wide: an edifice she found in Giotto that she describes as “very weird”; Rococo follies; a crumbling staircase from Ireland. (She had wanted to incorporate water, but it proved too complicated, so winding strips of Mylar were pressed into service instead.)

Jacobs picked the dilapidated structures he liked best (or found eeriest), his set designer of long standing got the model just before the Super Bowl, and the builders went to work. Eight days later, a benevolent, jagged-edged dystopia looms as the fashion audience takes its seats. When Feinstein sees her vision now, glowing in blue and ivory, five minutes before the first model finds her way down the vast curving catwalk, she says, “I expected the lighting to be more harsh. This is so moody, but I like it.”

After the show, Jacobs, beaming backstage in his trademark kilt, has his own take on the wacky wedding of influences behind his wildly ambitious, disconcerting stage set: “We were into ruins, but then also The Cat in the Hat! The Lorax! The famous picture of Kurt Cobain with the tinsel! Really, it was my pop references and Rachel’s art references—it was really just about the two of us.”
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source: nymag

Marc Jacobs’ castle-in-ruins set was designed by sculptor Rachel Feinstein. After the show, we caught up with an exultant Feinstein who explained how the whirlwind project all came together—in just a week and a half. “He called me and mentioned this sculpture I made called Puritan’s Delight, which is this broken black carriage, and he said that the clothes are starting to remind him of pilgrims, and kind of widows. So he was feeling my work, and whether I’d be interested in meeting with him. And I was, like, yeah.” Feinstein said. “So I went over that afternoon, and we had a meeting, and about two days later I brought up some ideas about broken castles and moats. And he said, ‘No castles, no fairytales—I want ruins, I want grottoes, I want, kind of like the Marie Antoinette version of a ruin.'”

She made four models in about a day and a half and then met with the carpenters and Stefan Beckman [Jacobs’ art director] on Super Bowl Sunday. The construction team started building that Tuesday, installing lighting and the runway, and Feinstein didn’t get to actually work on the project until Saturday. “I brought a team of two or three people that I always work with, and they had a team of about fifty carpenters, so we just did it in two days, really. Everything. So the last two days I have had no sleep,” she laughed. Feinstein has come to accept the fact that the set will be broken down. “It’s all made out of paper, basically. It’s not a real sculpture; it’s a very temporary structure that wouldn’t be able to exist after this time anyway.”
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source: modismonet

O desfile mais esperado da Semana de Moda de Nova York é o de Marc Jacobs, todo ano fashionistas param para ver quais serão os itens de desejo da próxima temporada. Marc começou chamando atenção com um belo cenário, feito por Rachel Feinstein, que o estilista descreveu como “ruínas no estilo Maria Antonieta”. As grandes inspirações de Jacobs nesta temporada foram Anna Piaggi e Lynn Yaeger, ícones fashion conhecidas justamente pelo estilo exagerado e irreverente. Casacos e vestidos, que ganharam uma armação no quadril, apareciam compondo looks sobrepostos e pesados. Apesar de visualmente stimulante, a coleção não é prática de se usar. Se o excesso de volume engordou modelos, imagina o que ele fará com mulheres reais.
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source: goplaymagazine

‘Rachel Feinstein’ ศิลปินสาวร่วมสมัยชาวอเมริกา ที่ถูกเชื้อเชิญโดยมัลติแบรนด์ระดับโลกอย่าง ‘Marc Jacobs’ ให้มาร่วมออกแบบผลงานศิลปะในแนว installation art บนฉากงาน ‘New York Fashion Week 2012’ กับรูปแบบที่เปรียบเสมือนหมู่บ้านการ์ตูน โดยใช้สีฟ้าอ่อนในการคุมภาพรวมทั้งหมดของเสื้อผ้าที่ใช้ในการเดินแบบ สร้างความประทับใจให้แก่ Marc Jacobs เป็นอย่างมาก ด้วยเนื้องานที่ดูแปลกตาสร้างความสมดุลให้กับเสื้อผ้าที่สวมใส่ในงานนี้.
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source: gagosian

Rachel Feinstein was born in 1971 in Defiance, Arizona. She studied at Columbia University and Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. Her work has been the subject of numerous solo and group exhibitions, including “The Alliance,” Hyundai Gallery, Beijing, China (2008, traveled to Hyundai Gallery, Korea); “Something About Mary,” Metropolitan Opera House, New York (2009); “Rachel Feinstein: The Snow Queen,” Lever House, New York (2011); and “The Little Black Dress,” SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah, Georgia (2012). Feinstein lives and works in New York.
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source: apaporkr

1971년 미국 아리조나주 포트 디파이언스에서 태어난 레이첼 파인스타인은 컬럼비아대학교에서 종교와 철학 및 스튜디오 아트를 전공했고, 스코웨건 회화•조각 학교에서 수학했다. 유리 위에 유화를 그리거나 석고와 나무를 사용해 조각을 만들어온 파인스타인은 바로크 양식과 동화에서 영감을 얻은 조각 작품으로 잘 알려져 있다. 2001년 뉴욕 마리안 보에스키 갤러리에서 첫 개인전을 가진 후, 소더비(뉴욕, 2002), 르 콘서시움(디종, 2006), 레버하우스(뉴욕, 2011), 가고시안 갤러리(로마, 2012) 등에서 개인전을 개최했다. 주요 그룹전으로는 <패스트럴 팝>(휘트니미술관, 2000), <십자가에 못 박힌 예수>(프리드리히 페첼 갤러리, 2004), <2회 안양공공예술프로젝트>(2007), <디 얼라이언스>(갤러리 현대 베이징, 2008), <썸띵 어바웃 메리>(메트로폴리탄 오페라 하우스, 2009), <리틀 블랙 드레스>(SCAD현대미술관, 사바나, 2012) 등이 있으며, 마크 제이콥스와 같은 패션디자이너와 협업을 진행하기도 했다.