YOCHAI MATOS

尤查·马托斯
יוחאי מטוס
Йохай Матос

Coming Down In Ecstasy

YOCHAI MATOS  COMING DOWN IN ECSTASY

source: maisonchaplinblogspot

Artist KRINK aka. Craig Costello has used her drained technique in the facade of the Image and Sound Museum in Sao Paulo, in collaboration with ROJO®NOVA. She also collaborated with artists Yochai Matos (lamps) and Rebecca Ward (tapes) in the same museum installation.
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source: maisonchaplinblogspot

L’artiste KRINK (ou Craig Costello) a utilisé son techniques drainé sur la façade du Musée de l’Image et du Son à Sao Paulo en collaboration avec ROJO®NOVA. Elle a également collaboré avec les artistes Yochai Matos (lampes) et Rebecca Ward (bandes) à l’installation dans le même musée.
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source: maisonchaplinblogspot

A artista KRINK, ou Craig Costello, usou a sua técnica escorrida na fachada do Museu da Imagem e do Som em São Paulo, em colaboração com a ROJO®NOVA. Também colaborou com os artistas Yochai Matos (lâmpadas) e Rebecca Ward (fitas) na instalação no mesmo museu.
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source: ronchinigallery

Rebecca Ward (b. 1984, Waco, TX) lives and works in New York. She received her BA in Fine Arts from University of Texas in 2006, and an MFA in Fine Arts from School of Visual Arts, New York in 2012. Ward produces paintings and large-scale installations, preferring an eclectic range non-traditional materials including: bleach, spray paint, tape and dye. Influenced by Minimalism, Abstract Art and Arte Povera her varied practice surrounds the iconography of feminine gesture, contemporary Americana culture and craft. Her much-celebrated tape installations adhere to ceilings, walls and floors, converging with existing architecture to create site-specific geometric designs.
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source: krink

To tell the story of Krink, the world’s quickest growing art supply line, you need to hear the story of KR, an entrepreneur who learned everything the hard way. KR grew up in Queens in the ‘80s surrounded by graffiti writers, skaters, and punks. Graf was a part of the attitude as much as it was the landscape. Everything was very DIY: steal paint, illegal spots, make markers, emphasize your style, experiment with multiple tools and methods. A lot of it was also based in economy (or lack thereof): sharing and stealing were simply a necessary part of the creative process.

In the late ‘80s, graf on trains died and the art spilled out onto the streets and highways. Writers became more mobile and so styles and tools changed accordingly. Homemade markers that had been the norm were too messy to carry and homemade inks faded in the sun. Pilot-brand silver paint markers became the tool of the trade yet in many ways couldn’t meet this new generation of artist’s very specific needs.

In the early ‘90s KR moved to San Francisco. The scene he found there was thriving, yet different. Most writing took place in parking lots and specified spots. He arrived with a whole different attitude regarding materials and styles. Ignoring designated areas, he used the streets of SF as his very own research and development lab, experimenting with a lot of different tools and techniques to create bigger, drippy marker tags. He also began making his own inks, allowing him to get up bigger, bolder and, now armed with an endless supply of ink, much, much more.

From these trials and errors, KR’s ink, or Krink, was created. He shared his concoction with a few friends and soon it’s silver markings dominated the city. In 1998 KR returned to NYC and brought Krink back with him. Before long, it’s signature style was covering the streets of NY as well. This was around the same time writers began realizing they didn’t need to trade in their lifestyle in order to make a living. The Alife store had just opened and was quickly becoming a mecca for young artists. They told KR that if he would bottle and sell Krink, people would buy it and they offered to help: it was more of a creative project than a business plan, something to work on collaboratively. It sold and people liked it and it just kept growing from there.

Fast-forward to today and Krink products are shipping daily from a headquarters in Brooklyn to everywhere from California to Moscow to Tokyo. The product line has grown to offer a number of different markers and inks that are unique to the market in their style, history and quality. And when the collaboration feels right, Krink continues to create limited-edition products with like-minded companies like Nike, Casio, and Coach. The trademark paint-drip aesthetic has found its way into art and design becoming a standard for street-inspired artists on a global level. It’s been 15 years and what started as a product created to fit the specific needs of graffiti writers has grown into a product line with a range of creative tools for creative thinkers. Watch closely over the next 15 as Krink continues to build its name as the premier art supply line for a new generation of artists.
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source: thecoolist
Israeli artist Yochai Matos uses light as his paintbrush. His installations span hundreds of fluorescent bulbs from simple white to an array of colors, communicating striking emotions, simple slogans or symbolic suggestions. Our favorite, “Flame (gate)” above, is a tear in the natural world, conveying hopeful emotions of the world beyond. We’d love to stumble upon this while walking through the woods at night. Also, we’d love to introduce Mr. Matos to the people at United Visual Artist– they share plenty of common ground, we’d love to see what they could accomplish in tandem.
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source: paperblogfr
Artiste isarélien basé à Tel Aviv, Yochai Matos réalise des installations lumineuses. Découvrez sa création « Flame (Gate) », entre sculpture et architecture.
En forme de flamme stylisée, cette installation se dresse et ondule, oeuvre d’art construite et archictecturée, constituée de tubes lumineux entrecroisés et fixés sur une structure porteuse en bois.
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source: blognaver
이스라엘의 예술가 Yochai Matos는 그의 예술 도구로 빛을 사용한다고 한다.
일반적인 감정과, 단순한 슬로건이나 상징적인 메세지를 전달하면서,
그의 설치는 단순한 흰색부터 색의 배열까지 수백개의 빛나는 전구로 빛을 발하며 완성된다고 한다.
어두운 색깔로 칠해진 캔버스게 빛이 새어 나오는 듯한 느낌이다.
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source: floresenelaticoes
La obra de Yochai Matos es un buen ejemplo de lo que se puede conseguir usando extensivamente, un modesto y primitivo material de iluminación como es el tubo fluorescente de toda la vida.
No es que estas instalaciones sean lo más original que he visto con este material, tampoco las que más me gustan, cuantos artista lo han usado de manera magistral, pero bueno, hoy quería iluminarme un poco y desde luego las instalaciones de este hombre desprenden luz en cantidad.
Además de obras con luz, también trabaja en las calles de Tel Aviv. Os invito a echar un vistazo, ya que el contexto en el que las lleva a cabo, no es el más habitual en el mundillo del arte urbano.