PHILIP GLASS

فيليب الزجاج
菲利普·格拉斯
פיליפ גלאס
フィリップ·グラス
필립 글래스
Филип Гласс
Einstein On The Beach

ROBERT WILSON
Portrait Trilogy:Einstein; Akhnaten; Gandhi
Einstein on the Beach is an opera in four acts (framed and connected by five “knee plays” or intermezzos), scored by Philip Glass and directed by theatrical producer Robert Wilson. The opera eschews traditional narrative in favor of a formalist approach based on structured spaces laid out by Wilson in a series of storyboards. The music was written “in the spring, summer and fall of 1975.”Glass recounts the collaborative process: “I put [Wilson’s notebook of sketches] on the piano and composed each section like a portrait of the drawing before me. The score was begun in the spring of 1975 and completed by the following November, and those drawings were before me all the time.”

Matic Veler

Matic Veler is ispired by researching his aesthetic development since upbringing up until now. One of the biggest inspiration, architecture of 17th and 18th century architecture, especially details and ornaments together with impression of magical environments combined with brutalism architecture he was surrounded in when he was child, help him to translate and reflect when creating garments and installations to impress viewers and customers. ​He uses Baroque architecture details and ornaments as his inspiration. Always starting with collecting different photos of details and studying different architects. 
Matic manipulates the ornaments into collages on which he draw sketches and then making toiles on mannequins.

MACOTO MURAYAMA

村山诚泰
METAMACHINE
Sunflower

Macoto Murayama cultivates inorganic flora. First, he chooses the plant and finds the real flower, for example the exquisite Lathyrus odoratus L. Second, he dissects the flower cutting the petal and ovary with scalpel and observes it with magnifying glass. Third, he makes sketches and photographs the parts of dissected flower.

Aisha Zeijpveld

What Remains
By crafting bodily optical illusions, the Aisha Zeijpveld ‘What Remains’ series obscures reality. These captures were taken by Amsterdam-based photographer Aisha Zeijpveld. According to her website, Zeijpveld’s “focus on people their nakedness and vulnerability yet simultaneously their potency and pride characterizes her photography.” In order to create that capacity in her work, the ‘What Remains’ series was based around the sketches of Austrian artist Egon Schiele. By translating these sketches into photographs, Zeijpveld recreates the expressive figures portrayed by Schiele often were “unfinished.”

POUL GERNES

Drømmeskib / Dream Ship
n the early 1960s, Poul Gernes started to concentrate on simple, reduced forms making strong visual effects like circles, stripes or dots in his painting, similar to pop motivs. Most of the approx. 40 Targets painted then were designs for architecture-related works. At first he drew the rings for his Targets in pencil, but later he went over to scratching them into the ground with a pair of compasses. This gave the paintings a relief-like character and created clearly defined color fields. The contrasting color intensities in the circles make each color seem like a distinct, three-dimensional volume. The vivid color combinations of the Targets (shown at the Venice Biennale in 1988) come from sketches or ready-mades like the stripes on a t-shirt. Sometimes Gernes used random systems as well, for example by putting paint pots behind him and dipping the paintbrush into one pot blind. Although it may not seem to be the case, Gernes’ work makes no passing references to contemporary works by other artists.