ADAM LAERKESEN

source: lookinarttv

The sculptures Adam Laerkesen creates can be described as ‘nouvelle baroque’. There is a lush and luxurious quality to his wall pieces, which he relates to as a salute to the spiritual nature of his subjects. Adam Laerkesen Installations Sculptures.
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source: neocollective

Adam Laerkesen artist statement for exhibition at Anita Traverso Gallery SILENCE AND NOISE (working title)

Nature has always informed my work, its imagination offers endless possibilities.
After the birth of my son Matteo, I once again thought about how nature shaped my childhood imagination. Memory had a story to tell. I grew up in the suburbs of Surfers Paradise, in a long, curved street with houses that had no back fence but instead opened onto a rambling park. A child could not have asked for a better play ground, this unmanicured park was a place of abandon until our mother’s call for dinner.
A couple of years later (inexplicable to me at the time), my parents decided to move to a ten acre property in the middle of the bush that was a half hour journey from our old house. Our new house had a long winding dirt track that opened up to a clearing at the top of the hill and there our house sat surrounded by the bush. As the weeks grew so too did my isolation, friends came to visit and we played in a cubby amongst the bamboo patch. I tried to get a sense of belonging in this place, this landscape, but I always felt those iron barks with their bleeding saps where watching me. I became familiar with surrounding bush, but I always knew that there was something unfamiliar present also. To this day when I reflect on my childhood in the bush it is still a mystery why this feeling of the other and unease was so strong. Was it the isolation? Was it the silence or the noise? Was it that we were surrounded or that whenever you stared out through the window the bush always stared back?
As I think of that experience, of immersion in the bush I have come to realize how it has shaped my sculptural practice. The familiar and the unfamiliar, mystery and the sense of other continue to pique my imagination.
The bush seeps into my dreams where the collision and marriage of opposites take place and there, visions manifest as starting points for my work. This unexpected combination asks the viewer to experience and think in new and divergent ways allowing for the possibility of the unconscious to manifest in my work, whilst giving space for poetic possibilities and the unfurling of the mysterious. Living in the bush all those years ago, instilled in me a desire to reveal forces of nature, “making the invisible visible”. The end result is often menacing and playful, dramatic and visceral, familiar and unpredictable.
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source: paperblogfr

Série d’installations et de sculptures réalisées par l’artiste Adam Laerkesen. Son travail est plébiscité à la fois par les collectionneurs et des institutions de poids telles que la Banque d’art, Sue Cato et Sass ou encore Bide. Adam Laerkesen vit et travaille à Sydney (Australie).
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source: bmfhub

Adam Laerkesen’s sculpture has been described as having an ‘eerie theatricality’. Taking citrus tree branches, Laerkesen then sculpts and transforms them into low relief wall pieces. He also utilises a technique known as ‘flocking’, popular in interior design. The velvet-like finish of the work suggests a lush mock-baroque texture.

This current body of work continues on the themes developed in the critically acclaimed exhibition ‘Hemisphere’, which was staged at the Tin Sheds Gallery at the University of Sydney in 2005. His works have been described as ‘lush and fleshy, resembling impossible arcs and enormous veins’.