ORLY GENGER

ORLY GENGER 7

source: museomagazine

Orly Genger builds stacks, walls, and even entire rooms out of rope, creating large sprawling sculptures that skillfully commandeer both indoor and outdoor spaces. Through her recurring use of coarse rope, extreme color choices, and what might be described as aggressive installations, Genger is a sculptor interested in reshaping space and actively engaging the viewer. Tacked onto the bulletin board of her Greenpoint studio are photographs of work by Richard Serra, Frank Stella, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Lynda Benglis. It is not surprising, given her practice, that she looks closely at this group of artists, all of whom are either major practitioners of Minimalism or artists who have directly responded to that tradition.

But perhaps more intriguing are the photographs of bodybuilders taped to various walls throughout her studio. For Genger, the physicality of sculpture is paramount not only to her process but also to the experiences she creates. While much of the rope she uses is repurposed from the sport of rock climbing, Genger likens her intensely demanding engagement with the material to wrestling. To prepare for installations, Genger ties her rope into knots by hand, an arduous and repetitive task. Once on site, she further wrestles with her material to coax it into massive accumulations that resemble everything from plinths and beams to molten lava flows. She then leaves the work for the public to navigate in experiences that are often physically and psychologically engaging due to the ways in which the installations occupy and often obstruct space. But the seriousness of her projects does not minimize the extent to which she also incorporates a playful humor into many of her works: for Genger this becomes yet another way to connect with and surprise the viewer.

When we visited Genger this winter, she was busy preparing for the exhibition, “Material World: Sculpture to Environment” at MASS MoCA in North Adams, Massachusetts (on view April 24, 2010 through February 27, 2011), which will feature her largest, most ambitious work to date.
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source: sandeedee

Using techniques of crochet, knitting, and knotting, Orly Genger creates
monumental sculptures with ropes, transforming the mundane material into powerful yet pliable installations. Genger’s work typically takes the form of abstract cubes, columns, and piles of monochromatic colors that reference the sculptural legacy of Donald Judd, Tony Smith, and Richard Serra. But genger transforms those static shapes into soft undulating masses that spill over into spaces of the gallery like a tsunami of tangles webs.

Her labor intensive, physically demanding practice requires her to wrestle with enormous amounts of industrial fishing or climbing rope . Genger’s hand-crocheted abstractions blanket, consume, surround, fill, swirl, and inspire—prompting viewers to contemplate the limits of their own endurance and daring them to reconsider all they once deemed impossible.
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source: editorialarcoiris

El trabajo de Orly, caprichoso, multicolor y muy original se expone generalmente al aire libre, aunque también lo ha elaborado en recintos cerrados como museos. Su técnica de tejido a mano se ha convertido en la base para la elaboración de obras escultóricas de diferentes tamaños que van desde tapices en habitaciones, hasta instalaciones enormes en lugares muy transcurridos.

Una de sus instalaciones descomunales más famosas es ‘’Rojo, Amarillo y Azul’’ y fue expuesta en el Madison Square Park en Nueva York del 02 de mayo hasta el 08 de septiembre 2013.”Rojo Amarillo y azul” consta de tres paredes onduladas y fueron construidas con 1,4 millones de metros de cuerda náutica tejida a mano y teñida con 3,000 galones de pintura de color eléctrico.¡Una verdadera obra de arte al aire libre en tamaño descomunal!

Las obras de Orly Genger están incluidas en varias colecciones de museos alrededor del mundo como son: el Museo de Arte Moderno de USA, el Museo de Arte de Indianápolis, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Whitney, entre otros.

En esta galería que hemos preparado para ustedes, queridas lectoras, veremos el trabajo laborioso de una artista del tejido que trabaja con materiales y herramientas fuera de serie: abstracciones de ganchillo a mano y enormes cantidades de cuerda de pesca industrial tejidas.