Patty Carroll

ПАТТИ КЭРРОЛЛ
帕蒂·卡罗尔

Anonymous Women: Draped
Empress

Patty Carroll 22

source: pattycarroll

Photographers observe, comment, criticize, and make fun of the worlds we live in by interacting with reality, and visibly displaying those perceptions in images. My training was as a straight, documentary photographer, but I stray back into the studio to make up fictional worlds.

I believe that every artist has a moment or time which became a defining point in their life view, and as we struggle to discover it, we repeat work trying to either recreate that moment, or possibly redefine it. As our inner and outer worlds collide, photography seems to be the most satisfying way of expressing that convergence.

Perhaps there are several moments that define a personality, and I look deeply for each one as it emerges. Artists often go to great lengths to find their soul place. Fortunately for me in this work, I only have to return to Park Ridge, either metaphorically or in actuality to find my defining moments and place.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: pattycarroll

Patty Carroll received her BFA in Graphic Design from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, and a Master of Science degree in photography from The Institute of Design, IIT in Chicago, studying fine art traditional photography with Aaron Siskind, Arthur Siegel, and Garry Winogrand, Since then, she has continuously taught photography at the university level. Beginning at a small American art school, The Aegean School of Fine Arts in Paros, Greece, and onto full-time faculty at Penn State University in 1973-74, the University of Michigan in 1974-76, and at the Institute of Design from 1977-1992. In England, she was Senior Tutor at the Royal College of Art in London and Tutor at London College of Printing from 1992-96. In Chicago, she has taught digital photography part-time at Columbia College until 2013, and is currently Adjunct Full Professor of Photography at The School of the Art Institute in Chicago.

Carroll has participated in many one-person and group exhibitions consistently since graduate school, mainly in traditional photographic exhibit spaces. Exhibitions include the large group exhibition entitled, “Elvis and Marilyn: 2 X Immortal,” which featured a variety of artists using the imagery of Elvis Presley or Marilyn Monroe in their work. It opened at the ICA in Boston in 1994, and travelled throughout the USA, and then to Japan until 1998. One-person exhibitions of her photographs of Elvis Impersonators have been at Memphis College of Art in 1997, and in 1999, “Elvis?” at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago.

Carroll has exhibited her “Anonymous Women” series in various museums and galleries world wide, including at White Box Museum in Beijing, Northern Illinois University Museum, DeKalb, IL, the Cultural Center of Chicago, and Martha Schneider Gallery, Chicago, IL. Images from the series have won numerous awarda and been feature in many online blogs such as Huffington Post, Feature Shoot, Rooms Magazine UK, among others. It has also been featured in several photography magazines such as the British Journal of Photography (BJP) and Domus, Israel. (Please see full CV for entire listings of related blogs and interviews.)

Her exhibition titled, “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” of night photographs was held at the Royal Photographic Society in Bath, England in April, 1996. This work has been shown in numerous gallery exhibitions; for example, in 1999 at Carol Ehlers Gallery in Chicago as a one-person exhibit, “Longings in the Night.” Her photographic portrait series “Spirited Visions,” was a collaborative project with Chicago artists, resulting in an exhibition and book of the same title, which toured for 2 years throughout Illinois, sponsored by the Illinois Arts Council.

Her photographs have been purchased by the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Museum of Contemporary Photography, and MOMA, as well as many private collectors. Her photographs have been published in various books as part of larger projects, such as Women Photographers (Abrams), and Changing Chicago, (U of I Press.) Her collaboration with Victor Margolin resulted in the book, Culture is Everywhere, released in 2002 (Prestel.)

As a professional artist, Carroll has been Artist-in-Residence in various parts of the world; In 1998, Carroll was selected as one of the four American Associate Artists by the Atlantic Center for the Arts, to be in residence at the Akiyoshidai Arts Village in Yamaguchi, Japan. In 1999, Artist in Residence at Anderson Ranch Arts Center, in Snowmass, Colorado, and in 2005 at Texas A&M University., and is currently Artist-in-Residence at Columbia College, Chicago.

She was the recipient of an Artist Fellowship Grant from the Illinois Arts Council in 2003 for her digital “Faux Film Posters,” which were shown at the Art Institute of Chicago in a one person exhibition titled,” Dark and Deadly.” This exhibit was featured as an interview on WBEZ, Chicago Public Radio program; “Hello Beautiful,” in June 2004.

Her color photographic work documents subjects of popular culture such as Hot Dog stands, Elvis Tribute Artists, suburban lawns, and night photographs of low life places; motels, restaurants and bars. In 2012, Man Bites Dog: Hot Dog Culture in America was published by Rowman, Littlefield and is the product of a long collaboration with Bruce Kraig, culinary historian. The hot dog stand photographs have been exhibited at many venues and are on permanent display at the Chicago History Museum. Professors Carroll and Kraig have appeared in many news outlets and have given informative talks about hot dogs and the American culture of food.

In 2005, Her book Living the Life; The World of Elvis Tribute Artists was published by Verve Editions. Her newer digital photographic work combines her pop culture interests using vintage Film Noir, humor and typography, while incorporating the earlier images of seedy locations at night. The series is a humorous look at current culture employing the pastiche of vintage film posters.

Carroll was trained in traditional photography, and most of her earlier work is documentary in approach. However, interspersed with the documentation of the outer world, she has also worked fervently in the studio. A new personal photographic series is about collecting and the obsession with “things.” The earlier images include a mounted 3-d object in a trompe l’oeil relationship with photographs. Again the work is humorous and draws upon a vintage world to comment on current popular culture by presenting precious and ordinary “collectible” objects. The “Constructed Ladies” are an elaborate series of still life images about domestic detritus. These pictures are a continuation of the earlier series of women hidden behind drapery or under domestic objects. In these series, the women become the objects; their identity fused with domestic objects.

Carroll has also curated several exhibitions, most importantly a large exhibition and catalogue of American still life photography titled, American Made: The New Still Life, sponsored by JACA (Japan Art and Culture Association,) and was shown in several Japanese museums in 1993. In 1998, she curated the photography exhibition, “The Constructed Self; Who Do You Think You Are?” commissioned by the Contemporary Arts Council in Chicago. A catalogue accompanied the exhibition on the theme of alternative identities. In 2000, she curated “E2K: Elvisions 2000” an exhibition of Elvis related folk and outsider art at Intuit, the Center for Outsider and Intuitive Art in Chicago.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: marvincommx

Patty Carroll creó esta serie de fotografías conceptuales basada en el hogar, como un lugar que ofrece seguridad y bienestar, pero a la vez un espacio que puede provocar claustrofobia. La mujer también forma parte de este mundo, quien es vista como la encargada de hacer del caos un lugar ameno: un ser anónimo reprimido por el machismo.

Los cuerpos envueltos en cortinas también hacen referencia a signos religiosos como la Virgen María y el burka, así como de vestimenta antigua griega y romana.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: codziennikfeministycznypl

Rzadko zdarza się, żeby słowa Czarnoksiężnika z krainy Oz – „Nie zwracajcie uwagi na ludzi za kurtyną” – używano do opisywania relacji kobiet ze sferą domową. Z drugiej strony, rzadko też mamy do czynienia z serią portretów, na których nie widać twarzy modeli czy modelek. Schemat ten łamie Patty Carroll w swoim projekcie zdjęciowym pt. „Anonimowe kobiety”.

Jak pisze w swoim artystycznym manifeście, „Wiele kobiet funkcjonuje w takiej roli – w milczeniu zarządzają życiem rodzinnym i domowym wydobywając piękno i porządek z chaosu, ale jednocześnie pozostają niedostrzeżone przez świat zewnętrzny, ludzi dokoła, a nawet przez siebie same.” Fotografując kobiety odziane od stóp do głów we wzorzyste tkaniny Carroll pragnie pokazać dom jako miejsce oferujące poczucie bezpieczeństwa, ale i klaustrofobiczne, kamuflujące indywidualizm – żadna z postaci nie ma twarzy.

Realizując swój projekt Carroll czerpała z własnych doświadczeń. Jako wychowana na przedmieściach Chicago uczennica katolickiej szkoły, artystka od zawsze miała kontakt z zakrytymi kobietami, których habity wywoływały w niej zarówno rozbawienie, jak i fascynację: w jej oczach funkcjonowały jako symbole autorytetu z jednej strony, a ucisku z drugiej.

Jak twierdzi Carroll, „Projekt ten ma za zadanie wytworzyć dla mnie substytut domu. Zawsze miałam obsesję na tym punkcie – pewnie dlatego, że miałam trudne i dziwne dzieciństwo. Od kiedy pamiętam chciałam mieć „perfekcyjny” dom, w którym wszyscy by się ze sobą dogadywali, byli trzeźwi, zawsze razem zasiadali do posiłków i mieli ręczniki ze sklepów, a nie skradzione z ostatniego motelu, w którym mieszkaliśmy. Tkaniny odgrywają dla mnie ważną rolę jako symbol tych pragnień i frustracji – uosabiają wizję stabilnego, tradycyjnego domu, w którym dużo uwagi poświęca się spójnej aranżacji. Tkaniny odcinają też świat zewnętrzny, kreując poczucie bezpieczeństwa i ciepło domowego gniazda”.

W swoich pracach Carroll inspiruje się twórczością swoich idolek: Diane Arbus i Hanny Höch, bawiąc się sferą emocji i psychologii, naginając ideę, że „miejsce kobiety jest w domu”.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: i-refde

Geschlechtergleichstellung und Emanzipation sind Themen, die den gesellschaftlichen Diskurs hierzulande stets befeuern. Ob nun eine Frauenrate in Führungspositionen, Mutterschaft oder Genderstudies. Von der Stellung der Frau in vermeintlich rückständigeren, wohl aber ideologisch anders begründeten Gesellschaften ganz zu schweigen. Auch die Kunst greift seit diese Debatte vom Zaun gebrochen wurde, die Thematik der Frauenbilder immer wieder auf.

Patty Carroll richtet ihren künstlerischen Scheinwerfer jedoch nicht auf jene offensichtlich diskriminierten Frauen, sondern auf die vermeintlich vollständig emanzipierte Ehe- und Hausfrau der fortschrittlichen, modernen Gesellschaft des 21. Jahrhunderts.

“Many women find themselves in this position, silently running a home and family, creating beauty and order from chaos, but remain unnoticed to the point of invisibility.”

Die Serie “Anonymous Women – Drapped” spielt mit der Assoziation, dass die Frau selbst zum Einrichtungsgegenstand wird, stumm, schmückend und gesichtslos. Das Heim wird zum klaustrophobischen Ort, Einrichtung zur Besessenheit und Weiblichkeit zu einem redundanten Attribut. Kleidung und Positur der Motive speisen sich aus einem eklektischen Mix der Zeitgeschichte: römische und griechische Statuen, Priester- oder Richterroben und die so viel zitierte Burka speisten die Inspiration der Künstlerin.

Den Grundstein für diese Arbeit legte ihre Kindheit und Jugend in einem beschaulichen Vorort von Chicago, in dem das tägliche Leben, einem idealisierten Klischee entsprach. Dort war das eigene Heim ein Ort von Perfektion und Harmonie, unangetastet von der harschen Realität in der Welt, frei von Verbrechen, Lotterei und dunklen Geheimnissen.

“I believe everyone has a hidden identity formed by personal traditions, memories, and ideas that are cloaked from the outer world. Cultivating these inner psychological, emotional and intellectual worlds is perhaps our greatest challenge as people, wherever we come from or wherever we live.”
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: kulturologiaru

Развенчивая удушающие идеалы красоты, сексуальной привлекательности и совершенства, которые часто принуждают женщин жить в замкнутом пространстве домашнего быта, серия фотографий «Анонимные женщины» («Anonymous Women») предлагает зрителю подумать, что происходит с личностью, когда смысл ее существования насильно сводится к глажке и выбору подходящих занавесок.

На первый взгляд может показаться, что все эти цветастые узоры, шелка и складки тафты на фотографиях Патти Кэрролл (Patty Carroll) излучают привлекательную ауру домашней роскоши, уюта и обеспеченности. Однако при ближайшем рассмотрении эта сиропная иллюзия быстро рассеивается.

За каждой из этих аляповатых драпировок скрывается человеческая фигура, полностью укрытая от окружающего мира, безликая и безымянная. Стоит произвести несложный метонимический перенос, становится понятно, что фигуры эти женские, а вся серия направлена на то, чтобы еще раз обратить внимание на одну из самых острых проблем современности – гендерное неравенство, которое выражается во множестве форм, в том числе, через архаичный удушающий стереотип, гласящий, что женщина – хозяйка домашнего очага, хочет она того или нет, место ей у печи, а высшее предназначение – следить за чистотой, рожать детей и обеспечивать любые нужды законного супруга.

Тема близка Кэрролл еще и потому, что она сама выросла в крайне консервативной семье в замкнутом мирке пригородного Чикаго. Драпировочные ткани, которые она использовала для фотосессии, с одной стороны, обыгрывают идею золотой клетки, с другой, добавляют эстетики декаданса: роскошная, соблазнительная оболочка, под которой скрывается неведомая опасность.

Если пойти еще дальше, можно отметить, что для заключенных в душный темный кокон женщин совершенно не важно, что по другую сторону: мещанский цветочек, «богатые» шелк или бархат, домотканое полотно с этническим узором или штора с ярким принтом в духе Икеи. Иными словами, к какой бы социальной прослойке они не относились, двойные стандарты все равно дают о себе знать. Какой бы безоблачной и совершенной ни казалась жизнь семьи стороннему наблюдателю, никому не известно, что на самом деле происходит за закрытыми дверями.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: admirationluxtarget

美国摄影师Patty Carroll的这个摄影作品集以”重塑一个家的概念“为核心,来重新思索女性与家庭关系间的双重性。这些窗帘围出来的不露脸女性,表带出了家庭给她们带来的困惑、迷惑感,有时甚至被家庭所吞噬。这些女性可以是任何人,太多的家庭事情让她们痴迷的同时,也渐渐让她们的身份变得模糊。美国摄影师Patty Carroll的这个摄影作品集以”重塑一个家的概念“为核心,来重新思索女性与家庭关系间的双重性。这些窗帘围出来的不露脸女性,表带出了家庭给她们带来的困惑、迷惑感,有时甚至被家庭所吞噬。这些女性可以是任何人,太多的家庭事情让她们痴迷的同时,也渐渐让她们的身份变得模糊。
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: estudioinstantaneablogspot

Patty Carroll nos muestra su serie de retratos de mujeres envueltas en telas; como si ésta fuese su piel. La no-identidad y el anonimato son lo que caracterizan estas fotografías. Las texturas y arrugas son la expresión de estos rostros ocultos. La doble intención de estas imágenes colocando a la figura de la mujer como un objeto decorativo. La elegancia, la belleza y el extrañamiento se combinan en una mezcla perfecta que lanza un grito rebelde feminista.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source: thegridsoupio

Basée à Chicago, la photographe américaine Patty Carroll nous propose « Anonymous Women: Draped ». Commencée lors du début de la guerre en Irak, elle a voulu rappeler avec ces silhouettes de femmes drapées que, quelque soit la nationalité ou la confession des femmes, toutes méritent de posséder un lieu à elle.