PHILIP GLASS

AKHNATEN
HYMN TO THE SUN
ANTHONY ROTH CONSTANZO

Philip Glass Hymn to the Sun from Akhnaten Anthony Roth Constanzo

source:metoperaorg
Director Phelim McDermott tackles another one of Philip Glass’s masterpieces, following the now-legendary Met staging of Satyagraha. Star countertenor Anthony Roth Costanzo is the title pharaoh, the revolutionary ruler who transformed ancient Egypt, with the striking mezzo-soprano J’Nai Bridges in her Met debut as his wife, Nefertiti. To match the opera’s hypnotic, ritualistic music, McDermott has created an arresting vision that includes a virtuosic company of acrobats and jugglers. Karen Kamensek conducts in her Met debut.

Please be aware that this production contains some full-frontal nudity, which may not be suitable for young audiences.

This production was originally created by English National Opera and LA Opera

In collaboration with Improbable

Production gift of the Rosalie J. Coe Weir Endowment Fund and the Wyncote Foundation, as recommended by Frederick R. Haas and Rafael Gomez

Additional funding from The H.M. Agnes Hsu-Tang, Ph.D. and Oscar Tang Endowment Fund, Dominique Laffont, Andrew J. Martin-Weber, The Walter and Leonore Annenberg Endowment Fund, American Express, and the National Endowment for the Arts
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:muziekwebnl
Philip Glass (Baltimore, 31 januari 1937) is een Amerikaans componist. Zijn muziek wordt gerekend tot de minimal music, hoewel hij zelf de term theatermuziek gebruikt.

Biografie
Glass volgde wiskunde- en filosofie-colleges aan de universiteit van Chicago en haalde daar op zijn negentiende een Bachelor of Arts-graad. Hij wilde echter componist worden. Hij studeerde dwarsfluit aan het conservatorium Peabody Conservatory of Music. Daarna studeerde hij verder aan de Juilliard School of Music waar hij hoofdzakelijk keyboard speelde. Na zijn studie reisde Glass naar Parijs voor twee verdere jaren van studie bij Nadia Boulanger. Hier werd hem gevraagd om de Indiase muziek van Ravi Shankar om te zetten in westerse muzieknotaties. Hiervoor reisde hij in 1966 naar Noord-India, waar hij in contact kwam met Tibetaanse vluchtelingen. Hij leerde in 1972 Tenzin Gyatso, de veertiende dalai lama, kennen. Hij ondersteunt de Tibetaanse zaak, onder andere door zijn medewerking aan het Tibet House, een initiatief met onder andere Richard Gere.

Het werken met Ravi Shankar, en zijn opvatting van ritme in de Indiase muziek, heeft tot de specifieke stijl van de muziek van Philip Glass geleid. Toen hij terugkeerde hield hij zich niet meer bezig met de componeerstijl van voor zijn reizen en begon met het schrijven van zware stukken gebaseerd op additieve ritmes en een tijdgevoel dat werd beïnvloed door Samuel Beckett, wiens werk hij leerde kennen toen hij voor experimenteel theater schreef. Glass vormde het Philip Glass Ensemble en speelde vooral in kunstgaleries. Zijn werk werd langzaam minder zwaar maar complexer, waarbij uiteindelijk Music in Twelve Parts ontstond. Zijn eerste opera Einstein on the Beach maakte hij samen met Robert Wilson. Dit werd uiteindelijk een trilogie met Satyagraha, gebaseerd op het leven van Mahatma Gandhi en zijn ervaringen in Zuid-Afrika, en met een sterke vocale en orkestrale compositie in Akhnaten, dat het leven verhaalt van de Egyptische farao Achnaton. Achnaton dankt de titel van revolutionair aan het feit dat hij als eerste een poging deed een monotheïstisch georiënteerde samenleving in te richten. Het werk wordt in de talen Akkadisch, Bijbels Hebreeuws, oud-Egyptisch en in de taal van het publiek gezongen. Het werk van Philip Glass voor het theater bevat veel composities voor de groep Mabou Mines, die hij heeft gesticht in 1970.

Sinds de jaren negentig schrijft Glass meer en meer conventionele klassieke muziek voor strijkkwartet en symfonieorkest.

Glass heeft gewerkt voor David Bowie, Godfrey Reggio en Errol Morris. In 1983 werkte hij mee aan het album Hearts and Bones van Paul Simon: het nummer “The Late Great Johnny Ace” eindigt met een door Glass gecomponeerde coda.

Voor zijn filmmuziek is Philip Glass drie maal genomineerd voor een Oscar, echter zonder er een te winnen. Het ging om Kundun (1997), The Hours (2002) en Notes on a Scandal (2007). Hij componeerde ook de muziek voor de film Compassion in Exile: The Life of the 14th Dalai Lama, de Oscar-winnende documentaire The Fog of War in 2003 en speelt een rol in de documentaire Refuge van John Halpern uit 2006.

In 2015 verscheen zijn autobiografie Woorden zonder muziek (Words without music), dat de nadruk legt op zijn levensbeschrijving en minder op zijn werk.

De Nederlandse harpiste Lavinia Meijer heeft samengewerkt met Philip Glass om een aantal van zijn composities geschikt te maken voor de harp. Zij trad diverse malen voor en met Philip Glass op en bracht de albums Glass: Metamorphosis/The Hours (2012) en The Glass Effect (2016) uit.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:pathelivecom
SYNOPSIS
Akhenaton est le fils du puissant pharaon Aménophis III. Lorsqu’il accède au trône, il réalise que le clergé est corrompu et profite des offrandes réservées aux dieux. Cela le conduit à remettre en cause non seulement les fondements de la tradition religieuse, mais aussi l’organisation de la société égyptienne dans son ensemble, provoquant ainsi le soulèvement des élites religieuses et du peuple contre lui.

PRESENTATION
La vie et les croyances mystiques du pharaon Akhenaton ont inspiré à Philip Glass un opéra intense et envoûtant encore inédit sur la scène new-yorkaise, avec des chorégraphies acrobatiques parfaitement calées sur la partition. Autre première, celle de la talentueuse cheffe d’orchestre Karen Kamensek qui officie pour la première fois au Met.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
source:observercom
The melancholy opera Akhnaten, with its oracular texts and elegantly cool music by Philip Glass, seems an unlikely candidate for a gala performance at that temple of excess the Metropolitan Opera. But Friday night’s Met premiere of the 35-year-old work not only filled the vast house but won a noisy ovation for the cast, the creative team and the octogenarian composer himself.

If the joyous demonstration felt a little incongruous, that’s because the piece is anything but triumphant. It presents, as a series of tableaux, the stunted career of the pharaoh who dedicated his relatively brief reign to a quixotic task of religious reform: setting the sun-god Aten above all others in the Egyptian pantheon.

SEE ALSO: A Bougie ‘Bohème’ Returns to the Met

According the scenario for the opera, this experiment in what we now call monotheism is a failure. Akhnaten, oblivious to the practical needs of his country, is deposed and assassinated and his religious reforms rolled back. The ghosts of the royal family lament for a while and then join their funeral procession.

Glass’ music is appropriately pensive through most of the piece, reflecting perhaps the protagonist’s distant and contemplative persona. The second act features two lovely extended pieces, a rich duet for Akhnaten and his queen Nefertiti and a solo of chaste sweetness as the pharaoh worships Aten.

The Met obviously put a lot of care into this presentation, and if there was a single weak spot, it was the playing of the orchestra. Despite what seemed to be sterling intentions on the part of debuting conductor Karen Kamensek, the trademark hypnotic arpeggios so key to Glass’ style sometimes sounded just a hair uneven. This issue was particularly prominent in the A minor prelude to the first act, which seemed to drag on forever.

Director Phelim McDermott and his team set the action mostly in a narrow strip of staging area before a tall structure indicating scaffolding, an allusion to Akhnaten’s ambitious temple construction projects, perhaps. The everyday intricacies of the Egyptian court—as seen through our modern fascinated but uncomprehending eyes—McDermott suggested with a troupe of jugglers.

Yes, there was a lot of juggling, but frankly I found that element better worked out than McDermott’s less than imaginative choreography for the principal characters. The slow-motion lateral crosses of the stage may have been intended to suggest the formal flatness of papyrus paintings, but in combination with Glass’ music the glacial movement felt derivative of Robert Wilson.

But in theater just about anything can work if a performer is committed enough, and in countertenor Anthony Roth Costanzo in the title role McDermott has found his muse. Even ideas that might sound outrageous on paper, e.g., Akhnaten’s “birth” from a mummy case, totally nude, and his slow scene of being dressed by a dozen attendants, felt absolutely organic and true.

Costanzo’s slight, slim figure and his rapt attitude perfectly indicated Akhnaten’s unworldly nature, and he was at his most compelling in the simply-staged numbers of the second act. Especially breathtaking was the finale of that act, when Costanzo, draped in trailing flame-colored silk, solemnly ascended a long flight of stairs on an otherwise bare stage.

That act also featured his best singing of the evening, when he smoothed over a brash quality in his voice heard earlier, and sang pianissimo in a gorgeously sustained “Hymn to the Sun.” In an ideal world, an Akhnaten might offer a more intrinsically lovely tone, but Costanzo’s artistry created a beauty of its own.

Sadly, his sound didn’t blend particularly well with the sumptuous mezzo of J’Nai Bridges (Nefertiti) in their love duet, though, again, their superb musicianship was palpable. The mournful final trio of the opera worked much better, with their voice complemented by the icy high soprano of Dísella Lárusdóttir as Queen Tye.

The casting of bass Zachary James as Akhnaten’s father and predecessor Amenhotep III was a masterstroke. His imposingly tall and muscular figure, in combination with his booming voice, created an archetype of royal power in contrast to the recessive, poetic Akhnaten.

The protean Met chorus sounded truly monumental in all the various languages of the libretto, and even managed a bit of juggling on their own.

Yes, Akhnaten is decades overdue for a Met appearance, but thanks to Philip Glass it doesn’t sound a bit dated. Even presented in a less than ideal way, it’s perfectly spellbinding.