Cokau Lab

H²élyos
H²élyos takes you into an imaginary world where unreal monsters coexist. These Titans are looking for a single goal, the light of the god H²élyos. He is the eye of the world. He is the one who sees everything. This project was originally designed as a 360-degree experience for The Immersive Art Festival, devoted to immersive digital design […] It used all the atelier technological power : 140 video-projectors, 50 speakers, 3000 m2 of projection surface.

Mike Pelletier

FILE FESTIVAL
Performance: Capture Part 2

In “Performance Capture: Part 2”, open source motion capture sequences are mapped onto stock low-polygonal unsmoothed 3D characters. Bodies inflate, deflate and oscillate between states, while movements shift and repeat in offset patterns as information transfers from one body to the next. In the animation, what should be used to record, simulate and create perfect virtual realities instead collapses into the uncanny, the abstract and the unreal.

Frederick Kiesler

Kiesler’s longest-running project was Endless House, a single-family dwelling whose biomorphic form and lack of corners strongly contrasted with the hard geometric edges that defined most modern architecture of the time. He sought to design a structure responsive to the occupants’ functional and spiritual requirements. He developed his ideas for the house over several decades, creating numerous sketches and models. Although plans were made to build a to-scale model in MoMA’s Sculpture Garden in 1958, they did not materialize, and the project remains unrealized. Nonetheless, Kiesler’s Endless House concept was highly influential and stands as a strong expression of his bold statement: “Form does not follow function. Function follows vision. Vision follows reality.”

video

Jeff Carter

Construction N
Often occupying both physical and temporal space, my sculpture has always incorporated both conventional and experimental media, including woodcarving, metalworking, installation, kinetics, microelectronics and video. While it tends to be visually diverse, the friction between object and memory has been at the conceptual core of my sculptural practice since 1994. The images, objects and narratives of a particular place or experience undergo distortions each time they are represented, and it is these forms of abstraction I explore in my sculpture.
Earlier bodies of work have utilized the physical residue of my traveling – the souvenirs, postcards, snapshots and videotapes – as central elements of the sculpture, forcing them to reveal their own inadequacy, disengagement or transformation, to subvert the nostalgic ideal, or to disrupt the usual implications of value and validation in a cultural artifact. In later works I utilize the physicality of scale, motion, and orientation to extend and challenge the conventional representation of landscape. These pieces define specific places as indefinite spatial constructs that complicate the certainty of “being there,” and are part of a larger attempt to relate a fragmented travel narrative through architecture, landscapes and souvenirs.
I have been using IKEA products as raw material for several years, and continue to be interested in extracting conceptual value from it. I am currently exploring the relationship between the Modern avant-garde and contemporary consumer design culture. In my recent work, I attempt to articulate various points of connection and rupture between IKEA and the Bauhaus by constructing scale models of demolished or unrealized buildings by Bauhaus founder Walter Gropius using “hacked” IKEA products such as tables, bookshelves and flooring.

Fang Tong

فانغ تونغ
Life could be little more unreal than you think.
VIA HIGHLIKE SUBMIT

GREGOR GAIDA

Polygonal Horse II

Gregor Gaida’s sculptures have something almost unreal, in them surrealism is powerful, there is transfiguration, symbol and narration; creates incredibly exciting sculptures in which even the elements: wood, resin and concrete mix without losing their contrasting nature. Its themes can be seen as three-dimensional snapshots, with fictional protagonists fighting and being advanced, extracted and distant from their original framework of action. In his sculptures, Gaida literally shapes this approach and stories without finishing them; many of his subjects are also physically cut in half, incomplete and, therefore, to be completed.