ANDY LOMAS

Morphogenetic Creations
Created by a mathematician, digital artist and Emmy award winning supervisor of computer generated effects – Andy Lomas, Morphogenetic Creations is a collection of works that explore the nature of complex forms that can be produced by digital simulation of growth systems. These pieces start with a simple initial form which is incrementally developed over time by adding iterative layers of complexity to the structure.The aim is to create structures emergently: exploring generic similarities between many different forms in nature rather than recreating any particular organism. In the process he is exploring universal archetypal forms that can come from growth processes rather than top-down externally engineered design.Programmed using C++ with CUDA, the series use a system of growth by deposition: small particles of matter are repeatedly deposited onto a growing structure to build incrementally over time. Rules are used to determine how new particles are created, and how they move before being deposited. Small changes to these rules can have dramatic effects on the final structure, in effect changing the environment in which the form is grown. To create these works, Andy uses the GPU as a compute device rather than as a display device. All the data is held in memory on the GPU and various kernel functions are called to do things like apply forces to the cells, make cells split, and to render the cells using ray-tracing. The simulations and rendering for each of the different animated structures within this piece take about 12 hours to run, Andy explains. By the end of the simulations there are over 50,000,000 cells in each structure.The Cellular Forms use a more biological model, representing a simplified system of cellular growth. Structures are created out of interconnected cells, with rules for the forces between cells, as well as rules for how cells accumulate internal nutrients. When the nutrient level in a cell exceeds a given threshold the cell splits into two, with both the parent and daughter cells reconnecting to their immediate neighbours. Many different complex organic structures are seen to arise from subtle variations on these rules, creating forms with strong reminiscences of plants, corals, internal organs and micro-organisms.

Emmanuel Van Der Auwera

Videosculpture XXI
Van der Auwera’s VideoSculptures take a new position to explore the intersections of digital and physical life and how the filtering of images in production, dissemination, and digestion alter both individual perception and consensual experience. Using the screen as sculptural material, these works break images out of the frame in a low-tech manner. They start with an act of destruction as the artist literally takes a knife to a screen to carve away physical layers. Unbeknown to most, these layers are filters that are adhered to every LCD screen. Without the mediation of these filters, images become impossible to see with the naked eye and white noise fills the space.

Shu Lea Cheang

Avatar of the artist
Taiwan in Venice 2019
“For those who don’t know her, Shu Lea Cheang is a figure of Net art and the cyberfeminist movement that emerged in the 1990s. Living in New York at the time, she was also an active member of the activist video collective Paper Tiger Television (as was French filmmaker Nathalie Magnan). Since then, Cheang’s work has dealt with “concerns including sex, futures, gender, ecology, money, media, and food [to] encompass film, installation, online work, social processes, and direct intervention in the sociopolitical, technical and aesthetic systems, and the imaginaries which co-compose them,” writes Matthew Fuller

Jordan Wolfson

House with Face
“Reiterated and reworked many times, Wolfson’s cast of characters shed new light on contemporary issues. In House with face, Wolfson revisits the witch whose face is recreated in what appears to be a log cabin tied in chains. While he claims not to be a political artist, Wolfson’s work nevertheless mediates the violence in our world today, often blurring the lines between real and imaginary.” S. Ozer

PO TING LEE AND MAARTJE DIJKSTRA

Po-Ting LEE is a Taipei-born new media artist. He has an almost incurable condition of Thalassemia and this is the main context for his creations. LEE studied sculpture in the Taipei National University of The Art. His works then were chiefly kinetic/installation and as well as sound works. LEE is currently studying at the Graduate Institute of Arts and Technology in Taipei National University of the Arts. In his work, he attempts to combine kinetic installations and sound.

PAOLA GAETANO-ADI

Desiring Machine: and/or the female reincarnation of Sisyphus
Née en Argentine, Paula Gaetano Adi est artiste et chercheure dans les domaines de la sculpture, de la performance, et des installations interactives et robotiques. Elle utilise le corps humain et non humain comme point de départ de ses recherches, et s’intéresse aux effets discursifs et aux impacts affectifs des technosciences sur la subjectivité humaine et dans l’art. Ses œuvres ont été présentées sur la scène internationale à Beijing, Berlin, Madrid, Moscou, Stockholm, São Paulo, New York, Poznan et Buenos Aires, entre autres. Elle a reçu de nombreux prix et bourses, tels que le premier prix à la compétition VIDA 9.0 sur l’art et la vie artificielle, organisée par la Fundación Telefónica, et le premier prix LIMbØ du Musée d’art moderne de Buenos Aires, la bourse Fergus Memorial en 2009 et 2010 de même que la bourse accordée à un artiste ibéro-américain dans le cadre de la compétition VIDA 14.0. À l’heure actuelle, Paula Gaetano Adi est professeure adjointe dans le programme de Studio Art du College of Visual Arts and Design de l’Université de North Texas, où elle coordonne le secteur réservé aux nouveaux médias. À cette université, elle s’est également jointe au groupe Initiative for Advanced Research in Technology and the Arts (iARTA).

NANINE LINNING

Endless song of silence
Nanine Linning is collaborating with renowned Russian fashion designer Irina Shaposnikova for the costumes for this new adaptation and with multimedia artist Roger Muskee for the video projections. The music is by Gorecki. In the fusion of the art forms there is a painful beauty, a longing for peace and security. Echoes of hope resound in the beautiful close-ups that are projected on two transparent film screens and blend diffusely with the live dance on stage. A wonderful metaphor for the struggle that goes with love and the farewell that follows.

Hybe

Light Tree: Interactive Dan Flavin
HYBE’s Light Tree: Interactive Dan Flavin re-illuminates the minimalist fluorescent light tubes of Dan Flavin from the 1960s, through digital technology. Experimenting with light and its effect, Flavin explored artistic meaning in relationships between light, situation, and environment. The readymade fluorescent light fixtures he used created space divided and adjusted by light and composition, offering a newly structured space with light. HYBE’s work expands the logic of Flavin by reinforcing the physical property of light through interactive media. It presents an escape from traditional lighting, as light and color changes when touched by viewers. Lighting here is divided into front and back, and colors are programmed to maintain complementary colors. The front lighting constantly interacts with colors on a back wall through visual contrast and mixture. A random change and diffusion of light with the involvement of viewers provokes tension extending and segmenting space, turning space into a forum for emotional perceptual experience.

Masaki Fujihata

Orchisoid

“Mobility, technological invention, and artistic invention “It’s not just about putting new media into art, or even making new media art. It is about making new media as an artist, about being an artist in new media. Therefore, if it is not only a question of renewing art by injecting it with new means, new tools, new subjects, it may be a matter of shifting its borders to the point of considering experiments, technological inventions, such as art-related events, as part of the artistic project ”. In my opinion, here is how to re-found art and breathe new life into it for years to come! Fujihata’s work leads us to think of Art as “technical conduct”. In this conduct, technique is not instrumentalised, it is therefore freed from having to serve FOR something, it does not have to be effaced in front of what it serves. But this notion is very “fragile” as Pierre-Damien Huyghe points out to us. Indeed, if the technique “is no longer used for” it is no longer “necessary”. We must therefore consider that what is not necessary is precisely what is useful. Highlighting the usefulness in a technique without going through a notion of service is precisely what is at stake in Masaki Fujiata’s artistic position. In his work, it is about exploring the possibilities of a group of techniques so that they do not end up in the use where they are usually agreed. At the heart of Fujihata’s work we are dealing with techniques rich in possibilities. The artist has an artistic conduct which does not seek the means to do something with these techniques but which seeks to discover them. The artist positions himself as a discoverer making both learned and humorous attempts … “Jorane Rest

JORIS STRIJBOS

SVNSCRNS
SVNSCRNS is a commissioning project that is initiated by Klankvorm after a concept by Joris Strijbos. The project consists of the realization of a kinetic audiovisual installation for which artists are invited to realize content. The installation can be used for live performances as well as for playing prearranged compositions. The installation consists of seven rotating projection screens and speakers that can be controlled from a central point. Custom build software and hardware are accessible for artists from different backgrounds to experiment with this new dynamic field for audiovisual composition. Light, sound and movement come together with different forms of digital media to create a multi sensorial experience for the audience. In this way the project functions as a platform in which makers and creators of all kinds can collaboratively explore this kinetic audiovisual medium. The result is a slow moving robotic structure which can display different sorts of media but in it’s presence will have a strong influence on the experience of the spectator.

Sougwen Chung

愫君
Drawing Operations
Sougwen Chung is an internationally renowned multidisciplinary artist, who uses hand-draw and computer-generated marks to address the closeness between person-to-person and person-to- machine communication. She is a former researcher at MIT Media Lab and current Artist in Resident at Bell Labs and New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York. Her speculative critical practice spans installation, sculpture, still image, drawing, and performance. Drawing Operations Unit: Generation 1 is the 1st stage of an ongoing study of human and robotic interaction as an artistic collaboration.

Alma Haser

birdgirl
It’s hard to pin down what media German artist Alma Haser actually works with: Her series involve photography, cut-up collages, rephotographing prints, and weaving together multiple images to strike a balance of time and space. Take I Always Have To Repeat Myself, for example. Each piece layers two or more prints either physically (weaving or overlaying strips of different photographs to add a sense of depth and dimension) or within a new frame—a number of the pieces feature sitters manipulating photographs of themselves, playing with perspective to offer and dizzying and disorienting fresh take on portraiture and image making.

Yoshi Sodeoka

袖岡由英
13-compositions #10
gif

Yoshi Sodeoka is an artist based in New York for over two decades, whose work is characterised by his neo-psychedelic aesthetic and exploration of multiple media and platforms. Primarily comprising of video, GIFs and print his practice also simultaneously inhabits the world of fine art, music, publications, and advertising.more