Ling Li Tseng

Mist Encounter
Mist Encounter is a summer pavilion stands in the large outdoor plaza in front of the Taipei Fine Art Museum. The summer sun and breeze will drift in and animate the scaffold and mesh structure. An indistinct mist will arise from the outer square and draw visitors to come closer. As visitors walk from the outer to inner square, they will be gradually enveloped by the mist, and things will appear and disappear as the mist alternately gets heavier and lighter. The effect will be similar to an experience of passing through a heavy fog in a magical forest.

NIKOLAS WEINSTEIN

This installation, for a restaurant in San Francisco, responds to three large skylights high overhead in a long, narrow space. The design is an interpretation of “extruding” the skylights down through a partial false ceiling and into the more intimate space below. For this project, we pushed our glass fabric techniques (used in the Capella Hotel and the IHG Lobby installations) one step further, heating the woven glass fabric in a kiln for further shaping. This lets us deform the tubes in the fabric as well as flex the overall matrix to create large continuous glass surfaces that billow like sheets in a breeze.

anthony howe

Cloud Light III
Kinetic sculpture resides at the intersection of artistic inspiration and mechanical complexity. The making of one of my pieces relies on creative expression, metal fabrication, and a slow design process in equal parts. It aims to alter one’s experience of time and space when witnessed. It also needs to weather winds of 90 mph and still move in a one mile per hour breeze and do so for hundreds of years.” Anthony Howe

THOMAS LANFRANCHI

Flying sculptures
Thomas Lanfranchi uses lightweight materials to create environmentally responsive sculptures. Many of his projects have been wind blown, taking the form of kites or wind socks. He has installed these pieces at sites across France and on buoys at sea. On a recent visit to Australia he made a journey around the outback, creating and documenting a new airborne sculpture each day to suit the site. Working with a type of plastic commonly used for shopping bags, Lanfranchi is able to make very large structures that are capable of being supported by the lightest breeze.