Mike Pelletier

FILE FESTIVAL
Performance: Capture Part 2

In “Performance Capture: Part 2”, open source motion capture sequences are mapped onto stock low-polygonal unsmoothed 3D characters. Bodies inflate, deflate and oscillate between states, while movements shift and repeat in offset patterns as information transfers from one body to the next. In the animation, what should be used to record, simulate and create perfect virtual realities instead collapses into the uncanny, the abstract and the unreal.

Freya Olafson

MÆ Motion Afterefffect
MÆ – Motion Aftereffect explores motion-capture, ready-made 3D models and monologues found online, ranging from experiences with virtual reality in live gameplay to out-of-body experiences and astral projection tutorials. The work addresses the impact of emerging consumer technologies associated with AR – Augmented Reality, VR – Virtual Reality, MR – Mixed Reality, XR – Extended Reality and 360° video. Monologues sourced from the internet provide the infrastructure for the work; an in-ear monitor feeds Olafson the monologues onstage, challenging her to listen and speak simultaneously. This dual action of listening and speaking enables her to embody a state of presence that references data streaming, live processing, and gaming. As a performer she becomes a conduit, medium, or interface, broadcasting edited monologues from the internet to the audience. The action of performing the work becomes like playing a video or VR game.

Liu Xiaodong

Weight of insomnia
With his new series of paintings, Liu uses a machine programmed to capture movement in public spaces and translates this to marks on canvas. The machine has no heart, no desires, no ulterior motive. It does not sleep but obeys its instructions for as long as the artist decides. And yet the results have a strange power to move us. It seems that, despite all efforts, subjectivity can never truly be extinguished. Join Liu as he discusses this latest painting project, the conflict and changes in Chinese society that have influenced his artistic approach and how we might all be affected by the ‘weight of insomnia’.