Fuse

Treu
Treu is a real-time audiovisual installation that elaborates on the multiple meanings and implications of the concept of trust. On a macro level it observes how historical events have influenced its course and considers how this can evolve in the future. On a micro level, it, explores how the presence or absence of trust can shift the perception of our individual realities.
Trust is a fundamental element of our society. Politics, economics, and our whole modern system are not material realities – they are psychological constructs based on the trust in individuals, in institutions, in the market. We decide to believe in the value of money, to undertake social changes only if we trust the inventions of our collective imagination.
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Zaha Hadid Architects

ShenZhen Science Technology Museum
A cascade of terraces will frame a large atrium at the heart of the Shenzhen Science & Technology Museum that Zaha Hadid Architects is developing in China. Slated for completion in late 2023, the pebble-shaped museum will encompass 125,000-square-metres and contain a mix of public spaces, galleries and educational facilities. It has been designed by Zaha Hadid Architects as a landmark for Shenzhen’s new Guangming Science City – a masterplan intended to establish the city as a hub for innovation.

Lien-cheng Wan

Reading Plan
“Reading Plan is an interactive artwork with 23 automation book flipping machines. When audiences enter the exhibition room, these machines will start to turn pages automatically and read the context at the same time. The updated figure to show that average student numbers per primary school in years 2016 in Taiwan is 23 students. I included a metaphor classroom in this artwork. In Taiwan, when people go to school, they don’t have much decision power to decide what they want to read and study. It is like being controlled by a huge invisible gear. The education direction led by authorities always prioritizes industry value and competitiveness. They want create a money-making machine instead of self exploration and humanism thinking.” Lien-cheng Wan

ron arad

رون اراد
阿拉德
רון ארד
ロン·アラッド
론 아라드
РОН АРАД
evocative proposal
For the canadian national holocaust monument competition, Ron Arad Studio teamed up with david adjaye associates to envision an evocative proposal commemorating the events, victims, and survivors of a grave moment in human history. Avoiding the use of direct symbols, the design places 23 sinuous and slender walls parallel to one another, creating a field of canyon-like passageways. Spaced 120 centimeters (47 in) apart, visitors are only able to pass through each crevice in single file. The partitions rise to a height of 14 meters (46 feet), drawing the eye upward toward the framed sky. This isolated journey is complemented by the shared experience of reflecting back on the monument’s significance.

alex da corte

Bad Cat

“A giant cat made of foam and tangerine velvet with a wide, cartoonish, sharp-toothed grimace, almost fifteen feet high, is flipped on its back at the center of the gallery. It’s vulnerable—it looks like it’s yowling—and its shadow is a cut-out wraith of blue carpet.” Erin Schwartz.

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Da Corte often uses surreal imagery and everyday objects in his practice and explores ideas of consumerism, pop culture, mythology, and literature.

Heiner Goebbels and Alfred Harth

At last I am free
The Duo Goebbels/Harth (1975–1988), combining German composer, music-theatre director and keyboardist Heiner Goebbels and German composer, multi-media artist and saxophonist Alfred 23 Harth became famous for its adaptation of and departure from European composers, especially Hanns Eisler, implemented in a provocatively fresh manner into structured free improvisations and deploying content from areas beyond music. The duo was nicknamed the “Eisler brothers” by music critic W.Liefland. They later also experimented with different genres and sound collages, including electronic devices. The duo played in many international festivals and concerts in cities as diverse as Tel Aviv, Zagreb, West and East Berlin and South America.

Cerith Wyn Evans

СЕРИС ВИН ЭВАНС
ケリス·ウィン·エヴァンス
Form in Space…By Light

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art. The neon experience builds, from a single ‘peep hole’ ring in the South Duveens, through which you can glimpse swirls of radial light and an imposing octagon in the central gallery. The fractured neon fragments look like frantically drawn sparkler-lines on fireworks night.But there’s method and logic within these celestial scribbles. Hidden in the design are references to a host of highbrow sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre, to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Don’t worry if you missed them. The beauty of rendering precise (verging on obscure) references in such a celebratory neon explosion allows for multiple – if not endless – interpretations.Each way you look at the sprawling 2km of neon tubing, a different shape or symbol emerges. No small thanks to the elegant way in which the structures have been painstakingly suspended. ‘There were over 1000 fixing points, and obviously we couldn’t drill 1000 holes in the Grade II listed building,’ Wallis explains. ‘We had to work with structural engineers very intensely, so as to be completely happy and convinced that we would be able to remove it without damaging the fabric of the building.’Though it seems too soon to be discussing the installation’s removal, Wallis has a point. It’s a visibly fragile, delicate sculpture – whose impermanence makes it more intriguing. As it is a site-specific sculpture, it can’t be recreated elsewhere. What’s more, because the neon tubes are filled with a constantly moving stream of pulsing, vibrating gasses, visitors will never see the same sculpture twice.

JIRO TAKAMATSU

高松次郎

Inspirée par des images d’ombres dans la peinture et les gravures sur bois japonaises du XIXe siècle, ainsi que par des ombres réelles projetées sur des portes coulissantes en papier dans des environnements domestiques, la série Shadow Painting de Takamatsu (1964–98) a étudié les fondements formels de la peinture à travers des représentations délicates de ombres (de clés ou de figures humaines) en émail et acrylique. La série rappelle également les empreintes figuratives laissées sur les murs laissés après la destruction nucléaire d’Hiroshima. Takamatsu s’est bridé à l’essentialisation du matériau et du médium au milieu du siècle, préférant plutôt un excès de l’ancien et, semblable à des artistes comme Eva Hesse, a créé des sculptures telles que Slack of Net (1968-1969) qui s’affaissaient et s’inclinaient sous l’effet de la gravité. Son Unicité du béton (1971) a pris la forme d’un gros bloc brisé en centaines de fragments, une ruine faite de monument qui contestait la suprématie du cube minimaliste.

DELORME

Eartha

Eartha, the world’s largest rotating and revolving globe, is located within the headquarters of the DeLorme mapping corporation in Yarmouth, Maine. The globe weighs approximately 5,600 pounds (2,500 kg), and has a diameter of over 41 feet (12.5 m). This gives it a scale of 1:1,000,000, on which one inch represents 16 miles (26 km), one millimeter represents one kilometer. As with most globes, it’s mounted at a 23.5 degree angle, the same axial tilt as the Earth itself; thus the equator is diagonal to the floor. It uses a cantilever mount with two motors, and simulates one day’s revolution and rotation every hour, though it is possible for the motors to fully rotate the globe in as little as one minute.