Anne-Sarah Le Meur & Jean-Jacques Birgé

Omni-Vermille
Omni-Vermille is based on computer-generated real-time 3D images. The programmed code allows light spots to oscillate against a dark background. The colors sometimes move dynamically, sometimes calmly across the projection surface; sometimes they evoke plasticity, sometimes depth. This continuous metamorphosis endows the contents of the images with a sensual, even lively quality. The metamorphosis designed by algorithms opens up a new time-based morphology of colors and forms for painting. The play of colors is accompanied by a stereophonic sound composition by Jean-Jacques Birgé (*1952, France). The sounds follow the shapes of the colors, only to stand out again the next moment: the combination of sound and image results entirely from the laws of random simultaneity.

UVA UNITED VISUAL ARTISTS

Blueprint
Blueprint embraces the relationship and parallels between art and science, creating compositions through the mathematical principles of logic that underpin life. Exploring analogies between DNA and computer code, UVA have created the Blueprint series; works that pair genetics and code as the blueprints of artificial and natural systems. As the work slowly changes over time, patterns fluctuate between varying degrees of complexity. Blueprint uses the basic concepts of evolution to create an ever-transitioning image. With cells literally transferring their genes to their adjoining others, colour flows like paint across the canvas. Drawing up a unique colourful composition every minute, Blueprint presents the unlimited outcome that results from a single algorithm; a single set of rules.

ANDREW HIERONYMI

move
File Festival
MOVE is an interactive installation divided into six distinct modules, JUMP, AVOID, CHASE, THROW, HIDE and COLLECT. Each module offers a single-user interaction, based on a verb corresponding to the action the participant is invited to perform. Each verb corresponds to a common procedure acted out by avatars during videogame play. Each module offers an interaction with abstracted shapes (circles, rectangles) behaving according to simplified rules of physics (collision, friction). Each module is color-coded with consistency, where the color red is used for the graphical element that poses the core challenge. Each module increases difficulty in a similar linear manner.What makes MOVE unusual is that unlike most computer vision or sensor based games like Eye-toy or Dance Dance Revolution, the participant IS the avatar, he is not seeing a representation of herself or an indirect result of her actions on a separate screen but instead interacts directly with the projected graphical constituents of the game. Because those graphical elements are non-representational they do not allow for a projection in a fictional space. The combination of abstracted shapes and direct interaction reinforces in the player the focus on the action itself (JUMP, AVOID, CHASE, THROW, HIDE or COLLECT) instead of an ulterior goal.