Henk Stallinga

Fanscreen
Fanscreen is comprised of several panels made up of computer fans which are linked together to form a larger ‘screen’. These screens are arranged side-by-side in a large circle that the viewer can enter. Each fan is programmed independently, creating an effect that mimics individual “pixels” on a larger screen. Moving in synchronicity, the programmed fans produce a kind of “film” of various abstract movements.

Kaws

Expanded Holiday
Expanded Holiday demonstrated the enormous potential of AR technology, which provides virtual perspectives on real-world environments, and conveys KAWS’s mischievous humour through the juxtaposition of physical and virtual worlds. These virtual sculptures were accessible via the Acute Art app and could be experienced in conjunction with the NGV’s exclusive exhibition KAWS: Companionship in the Age of Loneliness, a comprehensive survey of 25 years of KAWS’s oeuvre and his largest solo survey to date. Full of humour, hope and humanity, the exhibition featured more than 100 works including iconic paintings reappropriating pop-culture figures to more recent largescale, layered works, and an impressive collection of KAWS’s celebrated sculptural figures.

JEFFREY SHAW

The Legible City

In The Legible City the visitor is able to ride a stationary bicycle through a simulated representation of a city that is constituted by computer-generated three-dimensional letters that form words and sentences along the sides of the streets. Using the ground plans of actual cities – Manhattan, Amsterdam and Karlsruhe – the existing architecture of these cities is completely replaced by textual formations written and compiled by Dirk Groeneveld. Travelling through these cities of words is consequently a journey of reading; choosing the path one takes is a choice of texts as well as their spontaneous juxtapositions and conjunctions of meaning.

Maria Roosen

Maria Roosen calls herself “an artist with green fingers”—fittingly, her sculptures and installations feature imagery that references both plant and human organs, often in conjunction. Though her practice incorporates wool, wood, and sometimes watercolor, Roosen is best known for her ability to manipulate hand-blown glass. She creates a playful irony in the contrast between the material’s hardness and the fluidity and voluptuousness of the shapes she creates with it.

LINDER STERLING

לינדר סטרלינג
ЛИНДЕР СТЕРЛИНГОВ

The bodies, objects and surfaces were recognisably 21st century, but details and composition seemed oddly out of time, not least because the imagery was excised from print magazines and not from the internet, but also because the completed works so readily recalled Linder’s first photomontage experiments. Her pairings of different types of consumerist desire, which once declared themselves as critiques of misogynist objetification, are now equally a part of an abiding artistic practice. For example, looking at a particular conjunction of mock-ecstatic porn performers and ornate confectionery, we get the “message” but know too that we can only be in the obsessive, repetitive world of Linderland.

DONNA HUANCA AND RACHEL DE JOODE

CONJUNCTION