TAO DANCE THEATER

6&7
Tao Ye rejects any attempts to harness his work to narrative, which is why he numbers his choreographies rather than naming them. Numbers 6 and 7 were choreographed one after the other, but are presented here as a single work. 6 takes us into a dark world: six black-clad dancers emerge out of a foggy landscape resembling smog-choked Beijing. They start moving with one ‘voice’, treading the ground firmly and dancing—chiefly with the upper part of their bodies—a ritualistic dance which stretches the human body to the very limits of its flexibility. An equally minimalist soundtrack and the exceptional lighting design of Sweden’s Ellen Ruge, a close collaborator of Mats Ek, who has done a lot of high-profile work here in Greece, complete the raw materials of this performance-experience.

TAO Dance Theater

Since its founding in 2008, TAO Dance Theater has taken China‟s dance world by storm. The company has performed in every modern dance festival throughout the country and has collaborated with leading Chinese artists across genres including theatre, experimental music, film, visual arts and installation. TAO has been featured in performances as well as choreography and teaching residencies in festivals worldwide, including Europalia (BE), Culturescapes (CH), M.A.D.E. Festival (SE), Singapore Arts Festival, and the American Dance Festival (US).

TAO Dance Theater

6&8
In 6, his six dancers move in dynamic and hypnotising unison, in a shifting landscape of light created by Swedish lighting designer Ellen Ruge. His latest work 7 continues Tao Ye’s fascination with pattern, precision and ritual, and is distinguished by a sound track of acoustic effects generated by the seven dancers’ own bodies. Both 6 & 7 will be accompanied by specially commissioned music from Chinese indie folk composer Xiao He.

TAO dance theater

4&5
Tao Ye likes to designate his dances by number rather than name. After 4 comes 5, his latest to appear in the US: the 27-year-old choreographer behind Beijing’s six-member Tao Dance Theater is just getting started. And yet he is already a worldwide festival favourite and distinctive to boot, in spite of – or perhaps because of – his deliberately limited means. From 2012, 4 restricted itself to four dancers moving in unison and in a tight cohort within the square of the stage. The dancers’ faces were blacked out, their gaze down, their spines never succumbing to the easy beauty of uprightness, and their voluminous costumes, full of folds and creases, were identical.

Anarchy Dance Theatre

الفوضى الرقص المسرح
תיאטרון מחול אנרכיה
アナーキーダンスシアター
무정부 댄스 극장
Seventh Sense
Seventh Sense is the collaborative project between Anarchy Dance Theatre and Ultra Combos focusing on building up a new viewer centered performance venue. In this space all movements including the dancers’ and audience’s can be detected and interact with each other through visual effect. The audience is not merely watching the show but actively participating in it. Seventh Sense combines new media and dance to present a wonderful space atmosphere. The elements of interaction, theater and dance are rubbed in to a successful balance. by Sakai Naoki.
Photographer: Shou-cheng LIN

Ann Liv Young

Michael
Dance Theater Workshop

ALWIN NIKOLAIS

Noumenon

A truly universal artist, the American Alwin Nikolais (1910-1993) devoted his life to a radical form of staged art he called “dance theater.” Inspired (perhaps unconsciously) by the experiments of Bauhaus members such as Oskar Schlemmer and László Moholy-Nagy in the 1920s, Nikolais devised a style of abstract dance that encompassed costumes, stage sets, choreography, lighting, and music, all under his control. Also in 1963, Nikolais met analog synthesizer pioneer Robert Moog, who was at the time just starting his business in New York. He was fascinated by the sounds of Moog’s machines, and with the money provided by a a Guggenheim Fellowship, Nikolais bought the first ever commercially produced Moog synthesizer. It was the primary sound-source for all of Nikolais’ scores from 1963 to 1975. The instrument is now housed at the Stearns Collection of Musical Instruments at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

Tobias Gremmler

Virtual Actors in Chinese Opera
Created for a theater piece that fuses Chinese Opera  with New Media, the virtual actors are inspired by shapes, colors and motions of traditional Chinese costumes and dance. The project explores how costumes and motions can virtually reshape a human body.

OSKAR SCHLEMMER

أوسكار شليمر
奥斯卡·施莱默
אוסקר שלמר
オスカー·シュレンマー
오스카 슐 렘머
Оскар Шлеммер
Triadic Ballet
1-Margarete Hastings, Franz Schömbs, Georg Verden
1970
2-Super 16mm colour film, directed by Helmut Ammann.
Oskar Schlemmer saw the human body as a new artistic medium. He saw ballet and pantomimes as being free from the historical baggage of theater and opera and, therefore, capable of presenting his ideas of choreographed geometry, the man as a dancer, transformed by his costumes, moving in space. He saw the puppet and puppet movement as superior to that of the human, as this emphasized that the average of all art is artificial. This device could be expressed through stylized movements and the abstraction of the human body. Schlemmer saw the modern world being guided by two main currents, the mechanized (man as a machine and body as a mechanism) and the primordial impulse (the depths of creative urgency). He claimed that choreographed geometry offered a synthesis; the Dionysian and emotional origins of dance become rigid and Apollonian in its final form.

Ieva Misevičiūtė

Performing Tongue PhD
Tongue PhD is a new eclectic solo performance by artist Ieva Misevičiūtė. This ambitious piece consists of ten chapters each investigating a different metaphoric lens of the tongue. Tongue PhD fuses elements of physical theater, academic reverie, dance and Butoh, structured in the format of a PhD dissertation. CREDITS concept, text, choreography and scenography Ieva Miseviciutè

merce cunningham

简宁汉
מרס קנינגהם
マース·カニングハム
머시 디스 커닝햄
МЕРС КАННИНГЕМ
centennial
Joycetheater
The Joyce celebrates the centenary of Merce Cunningham, “one of the great iconoclasts in 20th-century art” (The New York Times), who would have turned 100 this year. Three superb companies perform masterworks from the artist’s vast repertory, each danced to live music.
photo:Dean Alexander

Markus Schinwald

Multidisciplinary in his practice, Markus Schinwald alternately uses painting, video, photography, installation, performance, theater, dance and even the art of the puppeteer. From his training as a fashion designer, the artist has retained a keen interest in the human body, exploring its capabilities and limitations, both physically and psychologically.

Philip Glass

فيليب الزجاج
菲利普·格拉斯
פיליפ גלאס
フィリップ·グラス
필립 글래스
ФИЛИП ГЛАСС
ECHNATON
Dance Company Nanine Linning / Theater Heidelberg
Chor und Extrachor des Theaters und Orchesters Heidelberg
Philharmonisches Orchester Heidelberg
Akhnaten (deutsch: Echnaton) ist eine Oper von Philip Glass über den ägyptischen König Echnaton und die Amarnazeit. Der Text ist in Englisch, sowie in ägyptischer und akkadischer Sprache. Die Uraufführung fand im März 1984 unter der Leitung von Dennis Russell Davies im Opernhaus Stuttgart statt. Stilistisch gehört die Oper dem musikalischen Minimalismus an.

doris chase

Circles II
Doris Chase has achieved international stature as a pioneer in the field of video art since she moved from Seattle to New York City in 1972. An artist of remarkable and continuous creativity, Chase now divides her time between her video headquarters in New York and a Seattle studio where she works on new projects in painting and sculpture.Beginning as an innovative painter and sculptor in Seattle in the 1950s, Chase created sculpture that was meant to be touched and manipulated by the viewer. Chase then developed large-scale kinetic sculptures in collaboration with choreographers, and her art was set in motion by dancers. In New York, her majors contribution to the evolution of artists’ video has been her work in videodance. On videotape, dancers and sculpture evolve into luminous abstract forms which represent some of the most sophisticated employments of video technology by an artist of the 1970s. In the 1980s, Chase began working in the nascent genre of video theater. In these productions, she uses the imtimacy of the video screen to achieve a new synthesis of visual and dramatic art. Her video theatre compositions present multicultural and social commentary, utilizing scripts by writers such as Lee Breuer, Thulani Davis, and Jessica Hagedorn in the “Concepts” series. Collaborating with actresses Geralding Page, Ann Jackson, Roberta Wallach, Joan Plowright, and Luise Riner in the “By Herself” series, she focuses on the viewpoints and experiences of older women. Today, coming full circle, Doris Chase in Seattle is exploring a renewed interest in painting and sculpture as well as in the modernist aesthetic she never really ceased pursuing, even during her most adventuresome multimedia years.

Breakdown

Interactive audiovisual dance performance
via highlike submit
Breakdown is an interactive audiovisual dance performance presented at the Ears Eyes and Feet event in the B. Iden Payne Theater, May 2014, UT Austin Texas.
Breakdown explores a 2 dimensional simulated world in which its physical rules are constantly being changed and manipulated by an external entity. An inhabitant of this world is in constant motion to adapt to its characteristics. He interacts with the physical rules and develops a dialogue with the entity who controls the forces. Eventually the inhabitant ends up breaking the world’s rules and release himself into a new world, a new dimension.

CINESTEIKA

Dina Khuseyn, Patrick K.-H., Oleg Makarov

A multivarious result of visual representation of 3 non-identical structures (dance performance, sound art and animation) points at interactivity as the main possible axis of reference. Necessity of this axis derives from specific interpretations that can only appear by juxtaposing of several systems. It opposes to traditional “parallelism” of media, employed in theater that only imitates causality, but having it already done before performance is starting.
In Cinestetika, each element of each media works as separate PROCESS, but also serves a SIGNAL to other medias. This essential core makes Cinestetika rather an instrument to make a term “live performance” filled with its perfect sense.