ROBERT HENKE


光正在使用高精度激光在屏幕上绘制连续的抽象形,并与声音完美同步。强烈的光线与完全的黑暗形成对比,缓慢的动作和微小细节的演化与强而有力的手势一样重要。结果既是古朴的又是未来主义的。新兴的模式为许多可能的解释留出了空间。象形文字,一种未知语言的符,建筑图纸,数据点之间的连接或类似Tron的早期视频游戏放大了1000

.

Light

Light is using high-precision lasers to draw continuous abstract shapes on the screen, perfectly synchronized with the sound. Intense light contrasts with total darkness, and slow movements and the evolution of small details are as important as strong gestures. The result is both quaint and futuristic. Emerging models leave room for many possible explanations. Hieroglyphs, symbols in an unknown language, architectural drawings, connections between data points, or early video games like Tron are magnified 1,000 times.

.

Lumière

La lumière utilise des lasers de haute précision pour dessiner des formes abstraites continues sur l’écran, parfaitement synchronisées avec le son. La lumière forte contraste avec l’obscurité totale, le ralenti et l’évolution des petits détails sont aussi importants que les gestes forts. Le résultat est à la fois pittoresque et futuriste. Les modèles émergents laissent place à de nombreuses explications possibles. Les hiéroglyphes, les symboles dans une langue inconnue, les dessins d’architecture, les connexions entre les points de données ou les premiers jeux vidéo comme Tron sont agrandis 1 000 fois.

Leo Villareal

Point Cloud
Point Cloud (ASU) is a newly commissioned artwork by Leo Villareal designed specifically for the ASU Art Museum in the Nelson Fine Arts Center. During his visit to the ASU Art Museum, Villareal was inspired by the museum’s architecture, designed by Antoine Predock in 1987. Villareal used mobile 3D scan technology to map both the inside and outside of the building, creating over 200,000,000 data points. The artist then manipulated the data points with his own custom software to create this public artwork. This is the first time Villareal has used actual data sampled from a location as part of an artwork.

ALEXANDER PONOMAREV

База

Объект «База» реализован во время работы художника по приглашению Министерства культуры Франции в ателье Кольдера в городе Саше. Девятиметровая горизонтальная труба, заполненная водой, образует тоннель для движения черной подводной лодки, которая, двигаясь по принципу троллейбуса, улавливается в крайних точках специальным устройством. Приподнимаясь над водой, на пропеллерах лодка поворачивается в обратную сторону и подобно хамелеону изменяет свою окраску, превращаясь в разноцветную и красивую. После погружения в воду лодка опять чернеет и стремительно продолжает движение

.

Base

Object “Base” was realized during the artist’s work at the invitation of the Ministry of Culture of France in the atelier Colder in the city of Sachet. A nine-meter horizontal pipe, filled with water, forms a tunnel for the movement of a black submarine, which, moving according to the principle of a trolleybus, is caught at the extreme points by a special device. Rising above the water, on the propellers, the boat turns in the opposite direction and, like a chameleon, changes its color, turning into a multi-colored and beautiful one. After immersion in the water, the boat turns black again and continues to move rapidly

Masaki Fujihata

Orchisoid

“Mobility, technological invention, and artistic invention “It’s not just about putting new media into art, or even making new media art. It is about making new media as an artist, about being an artist in new media. Therefore, if it is not only a question of renewing art by injecting it with new means, new tools, new subjects, it may be a matter of shifting its borders to the point of considering experiments, technological inventions, such as art-related events, as part of the artistic project ”. In my opinion, here is how to re-found art and breathe new life into it for years to come! Fujihata’s work leads us to think of Art as “technical conduct”. In this conduct, technique is not instrumentalised, it is therefore freed from having to serve FOR something, it does not have to be effaced in front of what it serves. But this notion is very “fragile” as Pierre-Damien Huyghe points out to us. Indeed, if the technique “is no longer used for” it is no longer “necessary”. We must therefore consider that what is not necessary is precisely what is useful. Highlighting the usefulness in a technique without going through a notion of service is precisely what is at stake in Masaki Fujiata’s artistic position. In his work, it is about exploring the possibilities of a group of techniques so that they do not end up in the use where they are usually agreed. At the heart of Fujihata’s work we are dealing with techniques rich in possibilities. The artist has an artistic conduct which does not seek the means to do something with these techniques but which seeks to discover them. The artist positions himself as a discoverer making both learned and humorous attempts … “Jorane Rest

Maria Guta and Adrian Ganea

Cyberia

Performance & live computer generated simulation

A postmodern fairytale, Cyberia takes place somewhere in a cold distant East, stretching between and endless imaginary realm and a vast physical space. It is a westwards journey towards a promised future with no arrival and no return. There is no here or there, only a twilight zone between a departure point and a simulated destination. Between digital video projections and a physical setting, using the mechanics of a video-game engine with a motion capture suit, Cyberia is the simulation of an endless pre-climax state where a performer and a CG avatar dance as one to the rhythms of an imaginary West. In a world oversaturated by digital data –mysticism and paranormal are as popular as ever. Emerging technologies are increasingly incorporated in a form of postmodern spiritualism, as Arthur C. Clarke points out: “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.

Naho Matsuda

EVERY THING EVERY TIME
The piece presents a running commentary on the activity of the city in which it’s located. The ‘poetry,’ which is created by an algorithm which randomly selects and rearranges the data collected from a number of site-specific points, and is posted on a website. The Pis pull the poetry from the website over 4G and then transmits the letter addresses via ethernet to the arduinos and then to the motors using I2C network protocol. The act of this then triggers the algorithm to generate a new poem.

FABIANO ONÇA & COLMEIA

Tantalus Quest
file festival

Game designer Fabiano Onça conceived the game, in which people must fill geometric shapes with their own silhouettes (as captured by webcams hanging from the ceiling): Software was built with OpenFrameworks, which is to C++ what Processing is to Java. A prototype was built with Flash (AS3), but it was slow — reading pixel values (BitmapData.getPixel) can be processor-heavy. Thanks to OpenFrameworks, porting the AS3 code to C++ was quite easy. The application is very simple: the images captured by the cameras are brightened, blurred and thresholded, resulting in black blobs. The amount of blob pixels inside the geometric shape count as positive points and the pixels outside the geometric shape count as negative points.

Marnix de Nijs

15 Minutes of Biometric Fame
The design of the installation 15 Minutes of Biometric Fame is inspired by the camera dollies employed in the television and cinema industries. A camera crane moves autonomously over a large circular track. In a rather intimidating manner, it points the camera at visitors in the exhibition space and scans each visitor’s facial features, comparing them to those of a vast array of preselected persons in a database.

SEIKO MIKAMI

Desire of Codes

This interactive installation consisting of three parts is set up in YCAM’s Studio A, a space that is normally used for theatre performances.
A large number of devices resembling tentacles with built-in small cameras are placed across a huge wall (Part 1), while six robotic “search arms” equipped with cameras and projectors are suspended from the ceiling (Part 2). Each device senses with insect-like wriggling movements the positions and movements of visitors, and turns toward detected persons in order to observe their actions. In addition, a giant round-shaped screen that looks like an insect’s compound eye is installed in the back of the exhibition space (Part 3). Visual data transmitted from each camera, along with footage recorded by surveillance cameras installed at various places around the world, are stored in a central database, and ultimately projected in complex images mixing elements of past and present, the venue itself and points around the globe, onto the screen. The compound eye visualizes a new reality in which fragmentary aspects of space and time are recombined, while the visitor’s position as a subject of expression and surveillance at once indicates the new appearances of human corporeality and desire.