ŽIL Julie Vostalová

ZIL

“DEVELOP A NEGATIVE INTO A POSITIVE PICTURE”

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Phygital way of designing that captures a momentum of transition between digital and physical worlds.
Digital and sustainable fashion with respect to materiality propose no-waste patterning that uses the technique of cut-ups to be assembled into a garment. Inspiration comes from the process of deconstructing historical garments and unexpected assemblage.

MARCIUS GALAN

diagonal section
With a recognisably minimal aesthetic, Galan employs abstract geometry to delineate the political and social implications of his chosen environments, deconstructing the codes of objects established through everyday use.

Coralie Vogelaar

Random String of Emotions

Emotion recognition software analyzes our emotions by deconstructing our facial expressions into temporal segments that produce the expression, called Action Units (AU; developed by Paul Ekman), and breaking them down into percentages of six basic emotions, happy, sad, angry, surprised, scared, and disgusted. In this video the artist uses this decoding system to turn the process around. Here – instead of detecting AUs – a computer is used to generate a random string of AUs. In this way complex and perhaps even nonexisting emotional expressions will be discovered. These randomly formed expressions, played in random order, are then analyzed again by professional emotion recognition software.

Coralie Vogelaar

infinite posture dataset

She moves by endlessly morphing to the rhythm of the device – strapped in the frame of the screen – following or giving instructions; part human, part machine. The design of the device is inspired by a gadget to cheat the step-counter on your smartphone. Technology tricked by technology. Her movements, caught within a motion capture like tight suit deconstructing her body parts, talk of complex and conflicting emotions, but her face, from which we usually read how someone is feeling, is hidden. But is the machine that is observing her deconstructed and re-sequenced postures actually capable of recognizing what the body is communicating? Are we?

Jonna Kina

Arr. for a Scene

“The sonic force of cinema’s most famous murder scene is investigated.Two foley artists recreate Hitchcock’s shower sequence, deconstructing the associations of aural signifiers, and the synesthetic power of sound. Jonna Kina contextualize this uncanny phenomenon — the “trans-sensory” quality of sound – within both Kina’s oeuvre, as well as other historical and contemporary works inside and outside the realm of art. In Arr. for a Scene (2017), Kina explores the structures and forms of cinematic sound – transforming an iconic image — the horrific shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960) – into the sonic frequencies of quirky, seemingly innocent, domestic objects.” Melissa Ragona

 

Marcius Galan

Empate
Marcius Galan explores the metaphorical capacities of space and our relation to it through his wide- ranging practice which includes installation, sculpture, photography and video. With a recognisably minimal aesthetic, Galan employs abstract geometry to delineate the political and social implications of his chosen environments, deconstructing the codes of objects established through everyday use. Whilst these configurations are always executed with graphic simplicity, Galan’s works are in fact complex material experiments that interrogate the functions, limits and frontiers of space and by extension, the socio-political systems which reside therein

Tom Lovelace

In Preparation No.04
Tom Lovelace works across photography, sculpture and performance, where concept prevails over form and his methodology is one of deconstructing conventions of a conceptual understanding of ‘discipline’. Primarily using the industrial landscape as his sourcing ground, he seeks to manufacture an ephemeral subject, creating environments and interventions that exist solely for the camera.