Daniel Widrig

ДАНИЭЛЬ ВИДРИК
Tower Study
Daniel Widrig’s studio now works in a broad range of fields including sculpture, fashion, furniture design and architecture. Embracing digital systems since its early days, the studio holds a unique position in the field and is widely considered to be in the vanguard of digital art and design.The Tower Studies examine this same material behaviour on an architectural scale, further blurring the distinction found on a small scale between structure and ornament.

Daniel Widrig

Organic
Daniel Widrig’s studio works in a broad range of fields including sculpture, fashion, furniture design and architecture. Embracing digital systems since its early days, the studio holds a unique position in the field and is widely considered to be in the vanguard of digital art and design.

ANDY LOMAS

Morphogenetic Creations
Created by a mathematician, digital artist and Emmy award winning supervisor of computer generated effects – Andy Lomas, Morphogenetic Creations is a collection of works that explore the nature of complex forms that can be produced by digital simulation of growth systems. These pieces start with a simple initial form which is incrementally developed over time by adding iterative layers of complexity to the structure.The aim is to create structures emergently: exploring generic similarities between many different forms in nature rather than recreating any particular organism. In the process he is exploring universal archetypal forms that can come from growth processes rather than top-down externally engineered design.Programmed using C++ with CUDA, the series use a system of growth by deposition: small particles of matter are repeatedly deposited onto a growing structure to build incrementally over time. Rules are used to determine how new particles are created, and how they move before being deposited. Small changes to these rules can have dramatic effects on the final structure, in effect changing the environment in which the form is grown. To create these works, Andy uses the GPU as a compute device rather than as a display device. All the data is held in memory on the GPU and various kernel functions are called to do things like apply forces to the cells, make cells split, and to render the cells using ray-tracing. The simulations and rendering for each of the different animated structures within this piece take about 12 hours to run, Andy explains. By the end of the simulations there are over 50,000,000 cells in each structure.The Cellular Forms use a more biological model, representing a simplified system of cellular growth. Structures are created out of interconnected cells, with rules for the forces between cells, as well as rules for how cells accumulate internal nutrients. When the nutrient level in a cell exceeds a given threshold the cell splits into two, with both the parent and daughter cells reconnecting to their immediate neighbours. Many different complex organic structures are seen to arise from subtle variations on these rules, creating forms with strong reminiscences of plants, corals, internal organs and micro-organisms.

Studio Tish

Vanishing Places
Vanishing Places is an audio-visual installation that investigates dialogues and tensions between the real and artificial. In keeping with the studios recent experiments with real-time generative visuals, Vanishing Places brings a new iteration of the intersection of digital life-simulating systems and organic interaction.

Oleg Soroko

Digital Substance

The parametric technology allows to generate a self-organizing system, that is, to open the essence of the universe as an infinite variety of possible self-organizing systems. The world is in constant process of self-development, but it is not chaos and not a set of known forms (cube, sphere, cylinder, from which you can build everything as Cezanne believed). Everything in the world (in the physical, biological and other reality) is in fluid, flexible, flowing, accelerating and decelerating movements that create tension, tears, force fields. And they are amazingly beautiful (attractors and fractals are their individual symptoms) and they exist before form and after form. It is not a solid, or lines in a space, but something that stands before and after the space.

ANDREAS NICOLAS FISCHER

アンドレアス·ニコラス·フィッシャー
أندرياس نيكولاس فيشر
Brute Force Method

Andreas Nicolas Fischer (*1982, Munich, Germany) concerns himself with the physical manifestation of digital processes and data through generative systems to create sculptures, videos, prints and installations. He holds an MA from the Berlin University of the Arts, where he studied in professor Joachim Sauter´s class. The artist lives and works in Berlin.

ANDREAS NICOLAS FISCHER

アンドレアス·ニコラス·フィッシャー
أندرياس نيكولاس فيشر
Brute Force Method
Andreas Nicolas Fischer (*1982, Munich, Germany) concerns himself with the physical manifestation of digital processes and data through generative systems to create sculptures, videos, prints and installations. He holds an MA from the Berlin University of the Arts, where he studied in professor Joachim Sauter´s class. The artist lives and works in Berlin.

Heather Phillipson

100% Other Fibres
Through collisions of image, noise, objects, language and bodies, Heather Phillipson’s videos and sculptural installations behave as places, musical scores, poems and nervous systems – attending to how physical and affective ‘selves’ are constructed, manipulated and, above all, escape. Often rendered as walk-in conglomerations of readily accessible materials (digital images, paint, cardboard, words, audio loops and reproducible consumer detritus), her works stake out an ambiguous territory in which cultural references and emotional responses are mutually contingent and reactive. Collapsing distinctions between the forthright and the inarticulable, the banal and the ecstatic, and between metaphor and extreme literalisation, Phillipson’s work performs constant tonal shifts, disruptions and bleeds. In so doing, it oscillates between physical intimacies and conceptual distances – desire, sensuality, touching and being touched, shame, anxiety, (over-)exposure, resistant surfaces.

TOSHIO IWAI

Piano
Iwai’s Piano — As Image Media (1995), a later sound work, is related to these early interactive experiments. Here the user, seated at the piano, triggers a flow of images that depress the piano’s keys; a consequence of this action releases yet another flight of images. The resulting interactive installation synthesizes two different aesthetics: sounds (simple melodies), images and a mechanical object (the piano) with digital media. A projected score and computer-generated imagery transform the piano into image media, hence the work’s name. Sound is the triumphant component in these works, for it activates and shapes the visual work. But the visual aspect of Iwai’s installations is lovely. His interactive systems appeal to the creative impulses of adults and children alike with their celebration of animation, computer potential, and the joy of sound.

MARTIN KALTENBRUNNER

reactable
file festival

The ReacTable is a collaborative electronic music instrument with a tabletop tangible multi-touch interface. Several simultaneous performers share complete control over the instrument by moving and rotating physical objects on a luminous round table surface. By moving and relating these objects, representing components of a classic modular synthesizer, users can create complex and dynamic sonic topologies, with generators, fi lters and modulators, in a kind of tangible modular synthesizer or graspable fl ow-controlled programming language. The instrument was developed by a team of digital luthiers under the direction of Dr. Sergi Jordà. The “Interactive Sonic Systems” team works in the Music Technology Group within the Audiovisual Institute at the Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Barcelona, Spain. Its main activities concentrate on the design of new musical interfaces, such as tangible musical instruments and musical applications for mobile devices. The reactable intends to be: collaborative: several performers (locally or remotely), intuitive: zero manual, zero instructions, sonically challenging and interesting, earnable and masterable (even for children), suitable for novices (installations) and advanced electronic musicians (concerts). The reactable hardware is based on a translucent, round multi-touch surface. A camera situated beneath the table continuously analyzes the surface, tracking the player’s fi ngertips and the nature, position and orientation of physical objects that are distributed on its surface. These objects represent the components of a classic modular synthesizer. The players interact by moving these objects, changing their distance, orientation and the relation to each other. These actions directly control the topological structure and parameters of the sound synthesizer. A projector, also from underneath the table, draws dynamic animations on its surface, providing a visual feedback of the state, the activity and the main characteristics of the sounds produced by the audio synthesizer.