Gerard O’Neill

O’Neill cylinder

O’Neill was inspired by the papers written by his students. He began to work out the details of a program to build self-supporting space habitats in free space.Among the details was how to provide the inhabitants of a space colony with an Earth-like environment. His students had designed giant pressurized structures, spun up to approximate Earth gravity by centrifugal force . With the population of the colony living on the inner surface of a sphere or cylinder, these structures resembled “inside-out planets”. He found that pairing counter-rotating cylinders would eliminate the need to spin them using rockets.This configuration has since been known as the O’Neill cylinder.

German Ermics

Ombré Glass Chair

“German Ermics is a Latvian designer who has recently presented to the public his splendid Ombré Glass Chair, which embodies the perfect tribute to To Shiro Kuramata and his iconic Glass Chair (1976), considered one of the iconic furniture designers of the 20th century. The keyword of his creation is “simplicity” combined with the transparency and the apparent lightness of the material, the result is an elegant minimal work.Another peculiarity of the chair is that it was manufactured with a new industrial product, the Photobond 100, welded without the use of screws or mounting-reinforcements, thus eliminating any superficiality.” Claudia Fuggetti

Stefan Tiefengraber

your unerasable text
“your unerasable text” is an interactive installation, dealing with the topics of data storage and elimination of data. The installation can be placed in an exhibition, but ideally it’s exhibited in a public space window, where it can be used by people passing by 24h a day. The participant is asked to send a textmessage to the number written on a sign next to the installation. “send your unerasable textmessage to +43 664 1788374”. The receiver mobile transfers it to a computer, which is layouting the message automatically. Then it is printed on to a DIN A6 paper, which is falling directly on to a papershredder. There the message remains readable for a few moments and gets destroyed then. The shredded paper forms a visible heap on the floor, which reminds of a generative graphic.

MICHAL MACIEJ BARTOSIK TENSEGRITY

lights

The tensegrity space frame light is comprised of a four strut lamp module whose geometry is the derivative of a cube. It affords a stable platonic structure with the ability to orthogonally tessellate in the x,y.z axes without change to its orientation to produce generic architectural elements such as: columns, roofs, walls and beams. Because tensegrity yields a system of structural correlation, moment force is eliminated and makes way for a high strength to weight ratio; as the system’s surface area increases, to a greater extent so too does its rigidity, allowing for generous spans and cantilevers. When arrayed, each consecutive module is pinned to the latter using its lamp connector to fasten to the mid point of an adjacent electrical tendon. The uniform array produces two distinct patterns of lamp and lattice. Where the lamps produce a luminous weave that at times resembles an orthogonal grid of offset lines, the lattice generates a sequential pattern of two distinct squares rotated at 45 degrees, one four times the size of the other.