HENTSCHLÄGER AND LANGHEINRICH

Akemi Takeya
Granular Synthesis

“From a few expressions on the face of the performer Akemi Takeya to a frenzied exploration of the alter ego, any known context of meaning ends in the dissolved movements, is stalled in denaturalized redundancy, in machine pain. The semantic void is too loud to be amenable to meditative reception. The frontal images, the rhythmic structures generate contradictory emotions and great strain.”

Coralie Vogelaar

Random String of Emotions

Emotion recognition software analyzes our emotions by deconstructing our facial expressions into temporal segments that produce the expression, called Action Units (AU; developed by Paul Ekman), and breaking them down into percentages of six basic emotions, happy, sad, angry, surprised, scared, and disgusted. In this video the artist uses this decoding system to turn the process around. Here – instead of detecting AUs – a computer is used to generate a random string of AUs. In this way complex and perhaps even nonexisting emotional expressions will be discovered. These randomly formed expressions, played in random order, are then analyzed again by professional emotion recognition software.

Antoine Catala

Emobot
Catala’s work investigate emotions and empathy in our technological information-driven society. His computer generated Emobot appears at once familiar and strange as it utters simple statement about its feelings. The visually mesmerizing figure might serve as an avatar onto which we relate to the expression of strong feelings when they are delivered digitally-an increasing prevalent cultural phenomena. Listening to a not-quite human presence express its vulnerability may have less impact in us than hearing a real person communicate similar emotions. Nevertheless, the deliberate and repetitive manner in which Emobot articulates powerful sentiments affords us ample opportunity to reflect on the existential quality of their meaning.

Liz West

Our Colour
Does colour change the way you feel? What does it feel like to be inside a rainbow? For the 2016 edition of the Bristol Biennial British artist Liz West invited visitors to drench themselves in the spectrum. West transformed architectural space and turned colour into an immersive and embodied experience by refracting light through carefully arranged coloured theatre gels. A vivid world was created, exploring human visual perception and how colour affects our emotions and our bodies.

Sanja Marusic

Red Yellow Blue

Plaçant des lieux au-dessus des gens, de nombreuses photographies de Sanja sont placées dans de grands espaces futuristes ouverts dans le but de créer des émotions visuelles surréalistes et aliénantes. Elle utilise souvent des couleurs fraîches et vives, ainsi que des objets et accessoires uniques pour créer des récits uniques et énigmatiques.

 

superbien studio

siderea
We presented our interpretation of a gravitational anomaly, entitled Siderea, an unknown force at the outer fringes of the Universe, in the centre of the Great Attractor. Beyond anything our eyes or our minds are capable of imagining and using geometric and scientific coordinates to create a palpable world to scale, we wanted to tell a deeply immersive tale exploring the emotions that the discovery of such a stellar phenomenon might rouse. Freely inspired by the explorations and incredible advances made in astronomy, we transformed the venue into the point of observation of this extraordinary celestial body, in the literal sense of the term.

Precht

Bert
“We are fully aware that architecture is this serious and profound craft with a long culture and tradition. You see that when we architects find reference for our projects in art, philosophy, literature or nature. For this project, we also looked at art to find reference. But not at Michaelangelo or Dali. Rather we looked at cartoon characters of Sesame Street or Minions. We took a playful look at this project and wanted to create a rather unique character than a conventional building. A quirky looking character that becomes part of the wildlife of a forest. I think this quirkiness can create feelings and emotions. And maybe these are attributes in architecture that are missing these days.”

KATAGAI Hazuki

Accessories for Wearing Emotions
Head Accessory of Tears
I have heard somewhere that it is not yet fully understood why people shed tears.
We shed tears when feeling sad, moved, sometimes happy.
I do even when feeling angry.
We cannot control our emotions.
They sometimes cannot be stopped from overflowing to the outside even before we internally register them although they should exist within and surely derive from the inside of us.
It is as if they do not even pass through our brain – As if it is an involuntary action,
like in sports, where the body moves before we tell it to.
However, what would happen when we trace the process in reverse?
I tried to make it work from the outside in.
(Like, we sometimes pretend to be okay with an unwilling smile.)
I want to see what would happen on the inside of us if we “wear” emotions on the outside.
Hazuki Katagai

Jessica Packer

Train Performance
Recently, I have found that traveling has made my anxiety peak. I suddenly feel trapped on a train, or in a car, and start being unable to breath. In order to both face this fear as well as do a performative piece about it, I taped myself up on a train. This is putting in to a literal sense the emotions I feel when traveling.

kevin abosch

Yellow lambo
The piece, “YELLOW LAMBO” (2018)[…] is a reference to a half-serious joke in the crypto community about using profits to buy Lamborghinis.“I became familiar with #lambo as a declaration of success-identity, and because I always think in terms of how to distill emotions around value, I wanted to explore that,” Mr. Abosch said. He created another token, called YLAMBO, and turned its address into a physical sculpture in yellow neon. This sculpture then sold for $400,000 at a San Francisco art fair to Michael Jackson, the former chief operating officer of Skype. The meta-weirdness around the purchase of the art is at the heart of the questions Mr. Abosch wants to explore.

ANTONY GORMLEY

Энтони Гормли
أنتوني غورملي
葛姆雷
アントニー·ゴームリー
Another Place (100 cast iron figurative sculptures)
Antony Gormley has over the past 30 years revitalised the human form in sculpture through a radical investigation of the body as a place of memory and transformation. “I am interested in the body”, he says, “because it is the place where emotions are most directly registered. When you feel frightened, when you feel excited, happy, depressed somehow the body registers it.”

KAZUSHI MUKAIYAMA

IJIROS
file festival
Ijiro is a robot which expresses emotions reacting to a user’s actions. Boldly, it consists of an OLED display, a speaker and an accelerometer in a cylinder shell. Ijiro isn’t able to move itself because it doesn’t have any actuators. However, it expresses emotions with faces in the display and voice from the speaker when a user touches it, lying, standing, swinging, hanging and so on. For example, if a user swings it softly, it reacts smiling. But if a user swings it roughly, it reacts angrily. So those reactions let users feel it like a baby. It is actually baby’s emotions characterized by cognitive science. Also, Ijiro’s shape is designed as a cylinder. It is considered to get various user’s actions because only a cylinder can be stood, lied down, rolled and so on in primitive shapes. Recently it has been easier to use electronic parts for arts. One advantage of making art pieces with compact electronics like a cell phone. So the art style is able to change from being viewed in a large room to being anywhere. Ijiro was developed to entertain people to keep it like a physical pet. We hope you all enjoy touching it.