PETER MOVRIN

“Movrin’s main inspiration has always been his childhood, where tradition, God and meat were the subject of everyday life. As an only son of a butcher in a small Slovenian town, surrounded by woods and bears, his growing up marked him with a roughness that he transcends in his designs with a special kind of romanticism. In this hard provincial life meat became his medium of expression, as a child he would carve steaks in a way that would appeal to his bewildered eye. There were, however, also fresh issues of Vogue magazines in the house, brought from trips to Trieste, that stirred up his imagination.” Black Sheep

mode:Niko Riam

mike winkelmann (Beeple)

迈克·温克尔曼
Майк Винкельман
minor peon

La cantidad no es lo mismo que la calidad, ya lo sabemos, pero el diseñador gráfico estadounidense Mike Winkelmann (alias Beeple) ha logrado hacer coincidir las dos cosas. Beeple, con su carácter autocrítico, decidió que la mejor manera de mejorar su talento artístico era completar una obra completa en un día, todos los días. Así nació el proyecto Everydays, que ya se encuentra en su octavo año consecutivo, y en 2015 la ciencia ficción es la principal inspiración. Cada año Beeple utiliza un medio diferente para crear sus obras artísticas, y este año el artista ha utilizado herramientas digitales como Cinema 4D, Octane Renderer, Z-Brush y X-Particles. En menos de 24 horas, Beeple es capaz de crear una ilustración digital hiperrealista que parece haber tardado mucho más en hacer. Los increíbles resultados resaltan paisajes y escenarios futuristas que parecen sacados de una película de ciencia ficción, donde hay un claro contraste entre la pequeñez de la figura humana (a veces casi imperceptible) y el aparato tecnológico que tiene frente a él. Otras obras, en cambio, representan formas más abstractas, que, sin embargo, nunca se apartan de su carácter futurista. Profundamente detallada y minuciosa, parece imposible que cada una de estas obras se cree y complete en un día, pero lo cierto es que la estadounidense El artista ya está en el 3030 de trabajo consecutivo y no parece querer frenar el ritmo. Es decir, es un artista reacio a la dilación.

Signe Pierce

A Reality Artist Taking Inspiration From The Everyday

Signe Pierce gained notoriety in 2015 within queer and feminist art circles for her incredibly shocking and poignant performance video, American Reflexxx[…] Currently, Signe is elaborating on the themes she began to explore in that video, such as cyber surveillance, constructs of femininity, and the male gaze.

RACHEL PERRY WELTY

雷切尔·佩里韦尔蒂
Lost In My Life
American artist Rachel Perry Welty makes use of the scads of everyday items we tend to throw away in her new ‘Lost in my Life’ series. She layers the often overlooked items to create a whole new textured landscape. “Most of us don’t pay much attention to the mundane objects we use everyday,” explains Welty, “like the twist ties that hold the plastic wrap on our bread and the broccoli together or the little paper cups that we pull out of a water dispenser.”

Kevin Beasley

Strange Fruit
Using both sculpture and musical performance in his practice, Kevin Beasley explores the physical materiality and cultural connotations of both objects and sound. His sculptures typically incorporate everyday items like clothing, housewares, or sporting goods, bound together using tar, foam, resin, or other materials. Often they also contain embedded audio equipment that warps and amplifies the ambient tones of their surroundings. For Storylines, Beasley has created two new works specifically for the Guggenheim’s Frank Lloyd Wright–designed building. Within this vast and open sonic environment, Strange Fruit (Pair 1) and Strange Fruit (Pair 2) (both 2015) offer an experience of intimacy, absorbing and reflecting the sound of the crowd at the scale of a personal conversation. Each work embodies this spirit of dialogue in its two-part structure—at its core are two athletic shoes, one merged with microphones, the other with speakers. Suspending these objects in space, Beasley compounds their technological interchange with additional layers of meaning, bringing to mind the urban phenomenon of shoes hanging from overhead wires or poles (itself an open-ended form of communication). At the same time the works’ titles refer to history of lynchings in the American South memorialized by Bronx schoolteacher Abel Meerepol in the 1937 protest song “Strange Fruit.” In these contexts, the hanging forms of Beasley’s sculptures resonate not only with his body, which molded them by hand, or with the bodies moving through the museum, but also with those inscribed in the problematic history of race and class in the United States.