J. MAYER H. und Partner, Architekten

于爾根·邁爾
يورغن ماير
위르겐 마이어
יורגן מאייר
ユルゲン・マイヤー
Юрген Майер
Danfoss Universe Science Park

Jürgen Mayer H. prévoit d’étendre «Danfoss Universe», un parc d’aventures scientifiques et technologiques à Nordborg, au Danemark, près du siège de Danfoss au printemps 2007. Plusieurs bâtiments d’extension sont en cours de construction sur le site de 5,5 ha, dont un restaurant et un centre d’expositions et de conférences (total 1400 m2). Ces bâtiments, d’une apparence exceptionnelle, mettent en valeur l’idée de base pédagogique et innovante de Danfoss Universe et visent à susciter l’intérêt pour la nature et la science.

CyberMotion Simulator

Max-Planck-Institut

The CMS consists of an industrial robot arm with six independent axes, extended with an L-shaped cabin axis. The seventh axis allows for varying the orientation of the cabin with respect to the robot arm by changing the location of the cabin’s attachment point from behind the seat to under the seat, or any intermediate position. Recently, the CMS has been further extended with a linear axis of ten meters. The resulting eight degrees-of-freedom (DOF) provide an exceptionally large workspace. Several extreme motions and positions can be achieved, such as large lateral/longitudinal motions, sustained centrifugal motions, infinite head-centered rotation, and up-side-down motions.

DAMIEN JALET

OMPHALOS
In ancient Greek Omphalos means navel as in navel or center of the world. Jalet’s creation examines the question of origins. The choreographer reflects on the human predicament and life in the cosmos, a recurrent theme in his work. For his first Latin American creation, Jalets brings together an ensemble of 20 dancers who perform to the music of Marihiko Hara et Ryūichi Sakamoto. This stunning performance makes light of gravity and instability, unfolding at the very edge of empty space. Exceptional event: the only performances in France as part of a world tour.

TAO DANCE THEATER

6&7
Tao Ye rejects any attempts to harness his work to narrative, which is why he numbers his choreographies rather than naming them. Numbers 6 and 7 were choreographed one after the other, but are presented here as a single work. 6 takes us into a dark world: six black-clad dancers emerge out of a foggy landscape resembling smog-choked Beijing. They start moving with one ‘voice’, treading the ground firmly and dancing—chiefly with the upper part of their bodies—a ritualistic dance which stretches the human body to the very limits of its flexibility. An equally minimalist soundtrack and the exceptional lighting design of Sweden’s Ellen Ruge, a close collaborator of Mats Ek, who has done a lot of high-profile work here in Greece, complete the raw materials of this performance-experience.