Jennifer Steinkamp

EON
“I considered the first life forms on Earth and how we came to be as a way to refer to the Natural Sciences. I looked at fossil records of the first multi cellular organisms of the Ediacaran Period, 555 million years ago for inspiration. I was struck by the theory of symbiosis in evolution; our DNA ancestors are the resultant fusion of single cellular organisms and bacteria. The millions of bacteria in our bodies are our foremothers. EON is a speculative fiction, a depiction of early life forms underwater. The Universe was formed 13.7 billion years ago. The Earth is 4.543 billion years old. Cyanobacteria or blue-green algae were the first microbes to create oxygen on Earth via photosynthesis 3.5 billion years ago. First humans 200,000-300,000 years ago.” Jennifer Steinkamp

xenobots

Xenobots – the First “Living Robots”
Researchers used the Deep Green supercomputer cluster and an evolutionary algorithm to design new life-forms that could achieve an assigned task. Then they built them by combining together different biological tissues from Xenopus laevis embryos, hence the name Xenobots.
Credit:A scalable pipeline for designing reconfigurable organisms
Sam Kriegman, Douglas Blackiston, Michael Levin, and Josh Bongard
PNAS, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1910837117

DAMIEN JALET

OMPHALOS
In ancient Greek Omphalos means navel as in navel or center of the world. Jalet’s creation examines the question of origins. The choreographer reflects on the human predicament and life in the cosmos, a recurrent theme in his work. For his first Latin American creation, Jalets brings together an ensemble of 20 dancers who perform to the music of Marihiko Hara et Ryūichi Sakamoto. This stunning performance makes light of gravity and instability, unfolding at the very edge of empty space. Exceptional event: the only performances in France as part of a world tour.

BENJA HARNEY

Having made his first paper sculpture at 25 while studying graphic design at Enmore TAFE, Harney – who works under the tag of Paperform – has since gone on to become one of Australia’s most prominent and creative paper engineers, with his incredibly intricate, detailed, lifelike paper sculptures, pop-up books, objects and backdrops commissioned by brands, galleries and commercial and editorial clients from around Australia and the world.

PAUL VANOUSE

Latent Figure Protocol

Latent Figure Protocol takes the form of a media installation that uses DNA samples to create emergent representational images. The installation includes a live science experiment, the result of which is videotaped and repeated for the duration of the gallery exhibit. Employing a reactive gel and electrical current, Latent Figure Protocol produces images that relate directly to the DNA samples used. The above images were re-produced live. Each performance lasts approximately one hour, during which time audience members see the image slowly emerge. In the first experiment, a copyright symbol is derived from the DNA of an industrially-produced organism (a plasmid called “pET-11a”), illuminating ethical questions around the changing status of organic life and the ownership of living organisms. Future instances of the LFP will use the DNA of other subjects and create other images.

Jonty Hurwitz

Anamorphic sculpture

London-based artist Jonty Hurwitz creates amazing anamorphic sculptures that can only be seen in their own reflections. In fact, without the mirror cylinder, most of his pieces would look like rubbish.
To create these sculptures, Jonty first scans a three-dimensional object, then uses computational software to come up with new physical forms.
“Finding that line between art and science is the underlying motivator in my art life,” says Jonty. “At heart I’m an artist scientist archetype that loves projects and people. Each of the art works and ventures on this site represent a part of what I am.”