Ann Veronica Janssens

Hot Pink Turquoise
Janssens’ works range wide, but they can all be described as sculptures that use the space as a stage for sensory activity. The simple white architecture of Louisiana’s South Wing becomes a resonating surface for Janssens’ both fragile and dizzying art – fragile because the works and their components are very simple while their effect elevates them above the material. Janssens herself often uses the word fluid to describe the effect of her works – even for example when they consist of a 6.5 metre long iron girder polished at the top so the room is reflected and it is hard to fix your gaze on the object. Janssens seeks no control of either works or viewers, for as the Dutch theorist Mieke Bal has said, Janssens’ artworks are at one and the same time object and event. Many of the works in the exhibition can evoke the sensation of standing at the threshold of something. They stress transitions and transformations between on the one hand a material level – evoked by glass, colour, liquids and not least light – and on the other hand a dynamic experience of time and space.

MICHAEL SCHMIDT AND FRANCIS BITONTI

Articulated 3D-Printed Gown
Michael Schmidt and Francis Bitonti revealed their fully 3d printed gown modeled by Dita Von Teese.
The fully articulated gown based on the Fibonacci sequence was designed by Michael Schmidt and 3D modeled by architect Francis Bitonti to be 3D printed in Nylon by Shapeways. The gown was assembled from 17 pieces, dyed black, lacquered and adorned with over 13,000 Swarovski crystals to create a sensual flowing form.Thousands of unique components were 3D printed in a flowing mesh designed exactly to fit Ditta’s body. This represents the possibility to 3D print complex, customized fabric like garments designed exactly to meet a specific person or need.

Max Cooper

Morphosis
Morphosis uses artificial neural networks to create morphing images of scale. The system explores how natural structures from the most tiny to the most huge, share aesthetic properties, as recognized by the trained network, and recreated in continuous flowing sequence via these connections. It’s a study of the seemingly infinite nature of space and natural physical structure, which can loop back on itself to give endless visual exploration and variation.

GeeksArt

Wavelet
It uses the changing light to mimic the flowing water. Wavelet is composed of 1,300 light-responsive light bulbs. Each light bulb is designed in an arc shape, which gives the light wave a distinct direction. Each of the teardrop-shaped light bulbs is embedded with custom-made electronics that detect and react to changes in light and colour. When any of the light bulbs detect a change in colour or light, it displays the colour accordingly. When any of of the lights are turned on, the adjacent light bulbs react to the light change and the light waves automatically expand out to the very edge of the installation. From a single source of light, waves spread out like a series of dominoes. The random variable patterns created give a pleasant surprise to the audience.

Danielle Wilde

LASERSPINE
A garment with lasers that project perpendicular to, and down the length of the spine. The complex technology in this interface is the body. Though it is not always evident, the range of movement of the spine is remarkable. Magnifying and making visible the relative position and dynamic tilt of the spine is sufficient to bring attention in an intense and unique way to this part of the body. That the wearer of the garment cannot see the lights projecting from their back serves to intensify this focus. The whole seems to enhance the poetic valence of movement of the entire torso, with the spinal column demarcated as the experiential, physical and energetic core.

KATAGAI Hazuki

Accessories for Wearing Emotions
Head Accessory of Tears
I have heard somewhere that it is not yet fully understood why people shed tears.
We shed tears when feeling sad, moved, sometimes happy.
I do even when feeling angry.
We cannot control our emotions.
They sometimes cannot be stopped from overflowing to the outside even before we internally register them although they should exist within and surely derive from the inside of us.
It is as if they do not even pass through our brain – As if it is an involuntary action,
like in sports, where the body moves before we tell it to.
However, what would happen when we trace the process in reverse?
I tried to make it work from the outside in.
(Like, we sometimes pretend to be okay with an unwilling smile.)
I want to see what would happen on the inside of us if we “wear” emotions on the outside.
Hazuki Katagai

Thomas Feuerstein

Psychoprosa

The exhibition PSYCHOPROSA focuses on mucus as a biochemical substance and sculptural material. The production of mucus takes place as a real process within the exhibition spaces, transforming the Frankfurter Kunstverein into an interconnecting ensemble of greenhouse, laboratory, walk-in refrigerator, cinema, and factory. Through tubes connected to one another, equipment and objects produce and transform their interior substances, refrigerators open and close automatically and transparent threads of mucus drip from expansive glass sculptures.

In close collaboration with biochemists, Thomas Feuerstein has developed the synthetic molecule Psilamin, derived from algae and fungi. In its production, large quantities of viscous biofilm are generated. If one were to take Psilamin, one would begin to feel psychotropic effects. Perception would liquefy, and objects in the room would appear soft and shapeless. Simultaneously, the flowing nature of the sculptural matter, which escapes solid form, externalizes an inner psychic process. At the end of the biochemical production process, which visitors can track in the different exhibition spaces, there is the expan-sive sculpture Accademia dei Secreti over whose glass containers vast amounts of mucus pour.

Ying Gao

Flowing water, Standing time
Montreal-based fashion designer, ying gao, designed robotic clothing out of silicone, glass and organza, and added electronic devices to create every-changing dynamic pieces that react to its surrounding chromatic spectrum. the collection, entitled ‘flowing water, standing time’ captures the essence of movement and stability over a period of time, and how different energies flowing through the garment, mirroring the colors in its immediate surroundings.

Yihan LI

Since the emergence of time as a concept, the circle has been a graphic representation that registers and measures the passing of seconds, minutes, hours, and even decades. . . . The torus may be seen as a three-dimensional form utilized to represent time as it travels through a cyclic loop. The geometric shape of the torus speaks of duration, of looped time, and of transformations along and in time. In this project, Boolean operations between varying tori in multiple dimensions indicate the interaction between durations—possibly time in addition to time, or interactions diluted by time—that reveal a new architectural realm featuring free curves which direct visitors’ movements inside flowing spaces. People will lose the perception of direction or time and find themselves worshipping in open and serene volumes.

Oleg Soroko

Digital Substance

The parametric technology allows to generate a self-organizing system, that is, to open the essence of the universe as an infinite variety of possible self-organizing systems. The world is in constant process of self-development, but it is not chaos and not a set of known forms (cube, sphere, cylinder, from which you can build everything as Cezanne believed). Everything in the world (in the physical, biological and other reality) is in fluid, flexible, flowing, accelerating and decelerating movements that create tension, tears, force fields. And they are amazingly beautiful (attractors and fractals are their individual symptoms) and they exist before form and after form. It is not a solid, or lines in a space, but something that stands before and after the space.

Lin Hwai-min

White Water and Dust
Set to the piano scores by Erik Satie and other composers, White Water is a lyrical dance of pure movement that flows beautifully as its title suggests. The curtain opens to a projected colour image of a flowing river; it slowly transforms into black and white. In serenity and in turbulence, whiteness of waves and ripples streams out of the blackness. Green netting and girds used for digital design interrupt the flow of water, thus revealing the process of creating virtual images and illusion of light, providing a pleasant surprise to the dance.
Cloud Gate
Cloud Gate is the name of the oldest known dance in China. In 1973, choreographer Lin Hwai-min adopted this classical name for the first contemporary dance company in the greater Chinese-speaking community.

Yihan LI

Architectural Timepiece
Since the emergence of time as a concept, the circle has been a graphic representation that registers and measures the passing of seconds, minutes, hours, and even decades. . . . The torus may be seen as a three-dimensional form utilized to represent time as it travels through a cyclic loop. The geometric shape of the torus speaks of duration, of looped time, and of transformations along and in time. In this project, Boolean operations between varying tori in multiple dimensions indicate the interaction between durations—possibly time in addition to time, or interactions diluted by time—that reveal a new architectural realm featuring free curves which direct visitors’ movements inside flowing spaces. People will lose the perception of direction or time and find themselves worshipping in open and serene volumes.

Koen Hauser

Koen Hauser is known for his intangible body of work flowing between fine arts, fashion and applied photography. Always looking for innovative ways of applying different visual styles and techniques both old and new, Hauser creates strong images that are contemporary and timeless, elegant and alienating.

Kevin Cooley

Fallen Water
Fallen Water explores questions about why humans are drawn to waterfalls and flowing water as a source for renewal. Waterfalls imbue subconscious associations with pristine and healthy drinking water, but what happens when the fountain can no longer renew itself? Is the water no longer pure? Cooley’s choice of subject matter strikes a deep chord with current social consciousness and anxieties about contemporary water usage and the drought crisis faced by the American West. Cooley references Blake’s famous quote from The Marriage of Heaven and Hell as context for the diametric opposites of the current water conundrum: our deep sense of entitlement to and dire dependence on this precious commodity, coupled with a pervasive obliviousness concerning the sources which supply it. As a way to connect with his personal water use, Cooley hiked into the mountains to see firsthand the snowpack (or lack thereof), streams, and aquifers which feed the water sources supplying his Los Angeles home. This multi-channel installation is an amalgamation of videos made over numerous trips to remote locations in the San Gabriel Mountains, the Sierra Nevada Mountains, and locales as far away as the San Juan Mountains in Southwestern Colorado. These disconnected video vignettes coalesce, constructing a large water landscape canvasing the gallery walls and floors – reflecting the disparate and widespread origin of Los Angeles’s drinking water. The colorspace within the videos is inverted, turning the water pink, orange and yellow—channeling an altered vision of water—in which something is definitely amiss: a stark reminder of the current water crisis in the state of California.
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TAKAHIRO MATSUO

تاكاهيرو ماتسو
松尾高弘
타카히로 마츠오
Такахиро Мацуо
Noctiluca
Swimming in a glowing, underwater sea of jellyfish would be a really beautiful experience. But, with limited access to the deep sea, this interactive installation by artist Takahiro Matsuo could be considered a backup to that kind of actual encounter. The dark blue room, a reminder of the oceanic abyss, is a seamlessly flowing design in which viewers can appreciate the beauty of these fascinating creatures without having to actually run the risk of a jellyfish sting.

Studio Nucleo

CARBONIFEROUS table

Carboniferous is a table that cuts through space, definite and strong.Its many layers of black surface together create a shape, a crystallization of a quick movement, crushing, leading the eye towards the future.The honeycomb cardboard, covered with fiber glass and resin is finished off with layers of carbon fiber.The carbon fiber composes and traces the design, the movement into its unique strength.
In Carboniferous you get the feeling that the top surface does not necessarily represent the ideal landing platform.On another perspective the landing surface generates the powerful and matherical base.
Carboniferous is flowing and exploding, like an aggressive wind with a clear direction.As the earth below, coal is extracted into a new form, the result of sediment build-up of plants,
and also the secrecy and conspiracy of the Carbonari, from underground and from the depth of their hiding places,which emerges a few decades later into the tricolore (the three colours of the Italian flag).
Coal, a dense network of plant remains, and Italy, a mix of cultures and different latitudes.Italian amalgam of different origins, Italy particle edges, Italy multiform, Italy tangle of angles,Italy blunt, concave and convex, Italy Alpine wedge, Italy coal.Sediment of a combustion that melted and transfigured particles.