Dorian Gaudin

The coffee cup spring
The monotone repetition of the movement created by the conveyor belt recalls the pace and the landscape of animation or video games. As an extension of the conveyor, several geometric and orthogonal motifs evoking a Tetris composition are slotted together and suggest the shapes of a table, a chair or stairs. The objects are exposed on thin metal structures with fringed ends, and seem to peel off from their construction, as if they were undressing and exchanging skins, depriving themselves of sculptural depth and allowing only the surface to emerge. The technique developed by the artist to produce the sculptures inverts the usual steps of printing: first the pattern is created, then the background to which the fiberglass support is apposed. The pieces are therefore ripped off their mold, revealing their final texture, and the motif on every sculpture seems to remain the same, yet is altered by the shape of the object itself. A series of wall works using this procedure extends from the installation into the gallery space.

Laura Splan

Disrupted Domains
Disrupted Domains features new animations created with molecular visualization software and SARS-CoV-2 structures displayed in Quorum at the Science Center. The animations were developed in remote collaboration with uCity Square biotech company Integral Molecular for Splan’s Science Center Bioart Residency while “sheltering in place” for COVID-19. The work in the exhibition is part of Precarious Structures, Splan’s project that explores the interconnectedness of cultural and biological systems during the coronavirus pandemic. Accompanying soundscape by Frank Masciocchi recorded in collaboration with Splan over Zoom.
VIDEO

UVA UNITED VISUAL ARTISTS

Harmonics
Harmonics challenges our perception of light and sound unfolding at great speed, an illusion of time blending. As the two kinetic sculptures speed up, rotating beams of light blend to form volumes of colour, while multiple discrete sounds become a major chord. Unable to process extremely fast information, our brain reads sequential sensory inputs as a single event in time. A disconnected reality perceived as a continuum, a harmonious whole.
VIDEO

Aleksandr Sokurov

ألكسندر سوكوروف
亚历山大·索科洛夫
Александр Сокуров
Russian Ark

“Alexander Sokurov’s desire to film The Russian Arch in one continuous take required extraordinary technical solutions. Since it is physically impossible to shoot more than twelve minutes of conventional film, we had to shoot on video. However, it was only the relatively recent arrival of 24p high definition compact cameras that offered the visual quality and the ability to make this film for theaters, including transferring the digital image to a 35mm negative.With the help of German specialists a complex portable platform was designed to meet the demands of the scenario which included precise architectural plans, highlighting the distance of 1300 meters covered by the course of the action. It was decided that the only way to move the camera would be to use a steadycam, although we could not be sure until after the final image that such a long steadycam shot would be possible, given the physical performance. extreme demanded from the German cinematographer, Tilman Büttner. After months of rehearsals, the 867 actors and extras, the three “live” orchestras all had to know their position and precise roles “. It’s just amazing.

cinema full

Brendan Fernandes

The Master and Form
Through his residency at the Graham Foundation, artist Brendan Fernandes worked with the architecture and design collective Norman Kelley to develop a series of sculptural devices that serve as sites for intense, endurance-based practice.more

henrique oliveira

Xilempasto 10
“Oliveira’s installations, which he refers to as “tridimensionals,” have evolved into massive, spatial constructions that combine painting, architecture, and sculpture. In some installations he uses walls as supports, attaching and shaping lengths of PVC tubing to create enormous, protruding forms over which he layers thin sheets of wood.”more

highlike book

launch interactive book

FILE – Electronic Language International Festival and SESI publishing house launch the “highlike book”. This is a yearbook on global contemporary ART and CULTURE. Its first edition has 584 pages with 577 artists from 35 countries. The “highlike book” encompasses several aspects of contemporary culture, providing the user a new form of appreciation of an art book. This is a book connected to the cloud. All information, images, videos and texts, is connected to their on-line counterparts in several languages, in a hybrid book which maintains its physical aspects and the virtual simultaneity of multimedia information. Its main purpose is to provide users with a new way of access culture in a global diversified view on the contemporary creativity in its transversal and heuristic aspect, by means of technologies currently available.

Refik Anadol, Kilroy Realty Corporation and SOM Architects

Virtual Depictions
Parametric data sculptures
The main idea of ‘Virtual Depictions:San Francisco’ is to bring 21st century approach to public art to define new poetics of space through media arts and architecture and to create a unique parametric data sculptures that has an intelligence, memory and culture. Through architectural transformations of media wall located in 350 Mission’ lobby, home of Salesforce, main motivation with this seminal media architecture approach is to frame this experience with a meticulously abstract and cinematic site-specific data-driven narration. As a result, this media wall turns into a spectacular public event making direct and phantasmagorical connections to its surroundings through simultaneous juxtapositions. The project also intends to contribute to contemporary discourse of public art by proposing a hybrid blend of media arts and architecture in 21st century.

GEBHARD SENGMUELLER

Slide Movie Diafilmprojektor
Black Cube-Installation: Eine Filmsequenz (35 mm Film, 24 Bilder / Sek.) Wird geschnitten und die einzelnen Bilder als Dias montiert. Sie werden dann auf 24 Diaprojektoren verteilt, die alle auf denselben Bildschirm (genau denselben Punkt) fokussiert sind.
Über die elektronische Steuerung der Projektoren werden diese Einzelbilder dann – äußerst umständlich – zu einer chronologischen Abfolge zusammengesetzt.
Die Formel „ein Projektor pro Bild“ führt somit zu etwas, das zumindest rudimentär (und aufgrund der mangelnden Präzision der mechanischen Geräte unvermeidlich sehr ungenau) auf einen Film hindeutet. Der Film-Soundtrack entsteht als Nebenprodukt – das mechanische Klappern der Projektoren wechselt die Folien.