FleuryFontaine

Ange
Ange is the result of discussions between two artists and a “hikikomori”. This term imported from Japan, which has no equivalent in France, is used to describe young people, sometimes even teenagers, choosing not to leave their room or their apartment for months or even years. Ael is one of them, recluse in a shed in his parents garden for 13 years, somewhere in the south of France. The artistic duo fleuryfontaine has maintained a relationship with him using internet. They used the video game as a medium to try to reconstruct the world of this hikikomori and to engage a dialogue during game sessions where Ael evolves in the environments created by the artist. His room, his objects, the parental home, his neighborhood, this film reveals the fragmented portrait of a man hiding from the world.

Ouchhh

AVA_V2 / Particle Physics_Scientific_Installation
Ava; is the surface-volume shape coefficient. The main inspiration comes from monumental experimentations which focused on particle physics. AVA’s design originate from the Buckminster Fuller’s iconic dome structure. It has 360 traceable area from the exterior surface of the dome. Cosmic rays reinterpreted within the concept of AVA and the first version of the performance screened at Paris. AVA is a Commisioned Artwork and designed as a portable installation which can be transportable and positionable at any place.

Shilpa Gupta

For, In Your Tongue, I Cannot Fit
‘For, in your tongue, I cannot fit,’ gives voice to 100 poets who have been jailed through time for their writing or their beliefs. The haunting work highlights the fragility and vulnerability of our right to freedom of expression today—and the bravery of those who struggle to resist. Visitors will encounter 100 microphones suspended over 100 metal rods, each piercing a verse of poetry. Over the course of an hour, each microphone in turn recites a fragment of the poets’ words, spoken first by a single voice then echoed by a chorus which shifts across the space.

Vanessa Beecroft

瓦妮莎比克罗夫特
נסה יקרופט
ヴァネッサ·ビークロフト
바네사 비크로프트
ВАНЕССА БИКРОФТ
La Membre Fantôme

For the installation ‘le membre fantôme’, vanessa beecroft takes the visitor back to the classical language of sculpture through a conceptual perspective, leading us towards an intimate gallery room inhabited by timeless statuary. shown at the 2015 venice biennale, beecroft presents a scene that is visible only at a distance, where the viewer must look through a crevice carved out of two marble walls. Through the panels, we see fragments of a stone garden, rich in archaeological allures and echoes of early twentieth century avant-garde. the archive of memory is here a tribute in bronze – placed at the centre of the installation – to marcel duchamp’s ‘étant donnés’, a reference model for her research that combines personal memories, historical and artistic impressions and a conceptual tension.

Studio Bigert & Bergström

Solar Egg
The egg is made out of stainless golden mirror sheeting, its multifaceted form breaking up the surroundings that it reflects into a multiplicity of different mirror images. Landscape, mine, town, sky, sun and snow are here combined into a fragmented image that can evoke associations with the complexity spanned by today’s discussion about climate and sustainable community development.more

Cerith Wyn Evans

СЕРИС ВИН ЭВАНС
ケリス·ウィン·エヴァンス
Form in Space…By Light

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art. The neon experience builds, from a single ‘peep hole’ ring in the South Duveens, through which you can glimpse swirls of radial light and an imposing octagon in the central gallery. The fractured neon fragments look like frantically drawn sparkler-lines on fireworks night.But there’s method and logic within these celestial scribbles. Hidden in the design are references to a host of highbrow sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre, to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Don’t worry if you missed them. The beauty of rendering precise (verging on obscure) references in such a celebratory neon explosion allows for multiple – if not endless – interpretations.Each way you look at the sprawling 2km of neon tubing, a different shape or symbol emerges. No small thanks to the elegant way in which the structures have been painstakingly suspended. ‘There were over 1000 fixing points, and obviously we couldn’t drill 1000 holes in the Grade II listed building,’ Wallis explains. ‘We had to work with structural engineers very intensely, so as to be completely happy and convinced that we would be able to remove it without damaging the fabric of the building.’Though it seems too soon to be discussing the installation’s removal, Wallis has a point. It’s a visibly fragile, delicate sculpture – whose impermanence makes it more intriguing. As it is a site-specific sculpture, it can’t be recreated elsewhere. What’s more, because the neon tubes are filled with a constantly moving stream of pulsing, vibrating gasses, visitors will never see the same sculpture twice.

Carla Gannis

Garden of Emoji Delights
FILE SAO PAULO 2015 

The Garden of Earthly Delights Triptych is one of the most famous works by the Dutch painter Hyeronimus Bosch. It dates back to the end of the fifteenth century and is kept in the Prado Museum in Madrid. The Triptych of the Garden of Emoji Delights is the version created by the contemporary artist Carla Gannis, in which space is invaded by small icons that today – thanks to the WhatsApp effect – are becoming an increasingly significant component of our language. It is not the first time that artists have played with emojis, perhaps inserting them in the real world or using them as neo-hieroglyphic fragments for cinematic riddles.