FONG QI WEI

퐁 치 웨이

‘Time is a Dimension’

The beauty of photography, in its essence, is conveyed by capturing a moment in time and freezing it out of its context. Singapore-based photographer Fong Qi Wei, however, uses photography to show the passage of time. In his time lapse series called ‘Time is a Dimension’, Fong doesn’t use a typical long exposure trick. He captures the passing time by layering different photos of the same spot with clear edge lines of each frame. Each collage is digitally cut and created from pictures Fong takes within 2 to to 4 hours. Fong usually works at sunrise or sunset, as the light and color palettes are most varied at those times.
“The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time, which is related to the adjacent panel/layer. The transition from daytime to night is gradual and noticeable in every piece, but would not be something you expect to see in a still image. Similarly, our experience of a scene is more than a snapshot,” explains Fong.

alexander lehmann

Hybris – Garbage Truck
Inspired by chaos theory and non-linear dynamics, Hybris invested a few years sitting in the studio to create his debut, and the results of such an amount of time invested in it stand out at first glance because not only has his head blown of how much ordinary human being crosses his music in addition to blowing the minds of Noisia themselves (who surely do not have to be very easy people to surprise), it has also made UKF (the largest d & b / idm community the world) highlight his first single as a piece worthy of freezing in time and that somehow revitalizes and reinvents the d & b that in Hybris Garbage Truck has not only found a new form of expression with what you hear but also with what you see with his precise and perfectly timed video made by Alexander Lehmann.

Paul Cocksedge

Freeze Multi Circle Table
In Freeze, Cocksedge exploits freezing temperatures to create a seamless bond between metals that otherwise do not adhere in nature. The breakthrough in the series – a table of copper and aluminum – was made by first burying four copper legs in snow, leaving them to contract by 100th of a millimeter; second, excavating the legs and inserting them into holes cut into an aluminum slab where they were allowed to un-freeze back to ambient temperature thereby firmly locking into place in a strong, invisible join.