Liam Young

Where the City Can’t See
Directed by speculative architect Liam Young and written by fiction author Tim Maughan, ‘Where the City Can’t See’ is the world’s first narrative fiction film shot entirely with laser scanners, designed in collaboration with Alexey Marfin. The computer vision systems of driverless cars google maps, urban management systems and CCTV surveillance are now fundamentally reshaping urban experience and the cultures of our city. Set in the Chinese owned and controlled Detroit Economic Zone (DEZ) and shot using the same scanning technologies used in autonomous vehicles, we see this near future city through the eyes of the robots that manage it. Exploring the subcultures that emerge from these new technologies the film follows a group of young car factory workers across a single night, as they drift through the smart city point clouds in a driverless taxi, searching for a place they know exists but that the map doesn’t show.

LIAM YOUNG

UNDER TOMORROW’S SKY
Eindhoven has a tradition to uphold when it comes to thinking about the future, with technology and design together playing the leading role. It was therefore inescapable that the English think tank Tomorrows Thoughts Today (TTT) would eventually find its way to Eindhoven. By now TTT has almost become part of the family.Not only did they contribute to the Great Babylon Circus at MU, with the intriguing ‘Landscape of unnatural history’, and conceive the luminous drones that performed an interactive choreography over the river Dommel during GLOW, but behind the scenes they also worked together with Philips Design on the Design Probes programme.This cooperation led to our curiosity about TTT’s many-sided practice and visions of the future being roused even further. More than any other they know how to link up contemporary, and in particular future-oriented thought on nature, urbanism, technology and culture, into inspiring and bizarre stories that tell us as much about the future as about the present day.

Refik Anadol

WDCH Dreams
The Los Angeles Philharmonic collaborated with media artist Refik Anadol to celebrate our history and explore our future. Using machine learning algorithms, Anadol and his team has developed a unique machine intelligence approach to the LA Phil digital archives – 45 terabytes of data. The results are stunning visualizations for WDCH Dreams, a project that was both a week-long public art installation projected onto the building’s exterior skin (Sept 28 – Oct 6, 2018) and a season-long immersive exhibition inside the building, in the Ira Gershwin Gallery.