Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

Recurrent Rayuela
“Recurrent Rayuela” is a generative artwork made with the 155 chapters of the experimental novel “Rayuela” (Hopscotch) published in 1963 by Argentine writer Julio Cortázar.

MSHR

Threshold Release Ornament
MSHR is the art collective of Birch Cooper and Brenna Murphy. The duo collaboratively builds and explores systems composed of sound, light, sculpture, software and circuitry. Their practice is a self-transforming cybernetic entity with its outputs patched into its inputs, the resulting emergent form serving as its navigational system. These outputs primarily take the form of installations and performances that integrate interface design with generative systems and a distinctive formalist approach. MSHR’s name is a modular acronym, designed to hold varied ideas over time. MSHR emerged from the art collective Oregon Painting Society in 2011 in Portland, Oregon, USA.

Daan Brinkmann & Nenad Popov

Cellwise
Cellwise is a generative projection specifically designed for the city hall of The Hague. During the festival the city hall becomes the new habitat of a kind of ‘visual lifeform. From the façade’s neatly arranged grid of white tiles, structures of a more entropic nature emerge. Shapes start growing, bursting, dripping, crawling and creeping. Cellwise is exploring the city hall’s sterile architecture, while at the same time challenging it to look for its visual counterpoints.

CASEY REAS

KTTV
This documentation video captures a few minutes of a continuous, generative collage. The source for the collage is one hour of edited signals captured from KTTV (198 – 204 MHz @ 34°13′29″N, 118°3′47″W) in August 2015
The sound was created by Philip Rugo

vtol

last breath
I understand passive instruments to be different multimedia objects that do not require management so much as co-existence with them based on relations born of a mutual “hybrid” symbiosis. The operating principle of the object is fairly simple – the exhaled air (its pressure and flow rate) activates the generative process, which depends on the exhalation parameters and is managed by the air movement in the organ. The object does not require any special game technique, although any change in the breathing (either premeditated or caused by physiological factors) is directly dependent on game dynamics and also on all the other parameters used to generate the sonic flow.

JON MCCORMACK

flicker

Flicker is an immersive electronic environment of generative image and sound. A collaborative work with Oliver Bown. Based on biological models of firefly behaviour, Flicker generates an ever shifting rhythmic, meditative environment to the viewer. Flicker uses 4 channels of synchronised high definition video and 8 channels of sound to immerse the viewer in a phenomenologically rich environment of artificial life. The work is a large-scale agent-based simulation, with each agent providing a rhythmic pulse at regular intervals. Agents try to synchronise their pulse with other agents in their immediate neighbourhood. The collective pulsations of groups of local agents are spatially sonified with int exhibition space. Over time, large groups synchronise at different rates, leading to complex visual and aural structures, syncopating and constant shifting in to a long term complexity.