Rafael Lozano-Hemmer

Saturation Sampler
Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s work Saturation Sampler, uses AI computer vision to track onlookers and extract the most saturated color palettes from their bodies and clothes, creating a gridded composition from the footage where viewers catch glimpses of their reflections in the pixelated field. With the widest color gamut available and an unparalleled 160-degree viewing angle, Luma Canvas delivers a unique viewing experience unlike any other. The direct emissive nature of the display’s LEDs creates a visceral and material encounter with Lozano-Hemmer’s interactive work, meaningfully situating his digital work within the physical realm.

Madi Boyd

the Point of Perception
Produced in collaboration with neuroscientists at UCL, Beau Lotto and Mark Lythgoe, this work is art and science; we intend it as an experiment in the gallery. It manifests as an immersive environment consisting of a ‘screen’ which is a large gridded space of uncertainty and projected film.The project came about after I undertook a period of research of the human visual system and neuroesthetics and set up a collaboration with Professor Mark Lythgoe and Dr Beau Lotto at UCL.

TACITA DEAN

Turbine Hall

The Turbine Hall of Tate Modern is plunged into deep black gloom. At its east end, like the stained glass window of a cathedral, is a giant vertical screen. It is framed at the edges with sprocket holes, so we feel we are looking at a vast reel of film. In the centre, an ever-changing series of images: a snail on a wind-wobbled leaf, the powerful spume of a fountain, a chimney loosing trails of vapour. Sometimes the image is of the back wall of the Turbine Hall itself, but with its gridded form coloured in red, yellow and blue so it resembles a Mondrian. Or with a giant egg apparently floating from ceiling to floor.