BarabásiLab

Hidden Patterns
The co-citation network for Nature: more than 88,000 papers published by the journal since 1900 are each represented by a dot, coloured by discipline. Papers are linked if another scientific paper (of those indexed in the Web of Science) cites both; the dot size reflects the number of these co-citation links.
Invisible, hidden connections and constantly repeating patterns within nature, society, language, and culture can not only be explored but also made visible. Barabási’s network approach promises to deliver a comprehensive, universal method that will illuminate many phenomena with scientific precision.

Refik Anadol

Machine Hallucination
Refik Anadol’s most recent synesthetic reality experiments deeply engage with these centuries-old questions and attempt at revealing new connections between visual narrative, archival instinct and collective consciousness. The project focuses on latent cinematic experiences derived from representations of urban memories as they are re-imagined by machine intelligence. For Artechouse’s New York location, Anadol presents a data universe of New York City in 1025 latent dimensions that he creates by deploying machine learning algorithms on over 100 million photographic memories of New York City found publicly in social networks. Machine Hallucination thus generates a novel form of synesthetic storytelling through its multilayered manipulation of a vast visual archive beyond the conventional limits of the camera and the existing cinematographic techniques. The resulting artwork is a 30-minute experimental cinema, presented in 16K resolution, that visualizes the story of New York through the city’s collective memories that constitute its deeply-hidden consciousness.

Marcos Novak

Turbulent Topologies
This exhibition explores turbulence as both a formal principle and as a condition of the global metropolis. Through a variety of means, both visible and invisible, it examines the turbulent topologies of mixed layers and crossed currents, hidden links and sudden connections, flow networks and perturbed stratifications. Using both high and low technologies, it proposes a continuum between actual, virtual, and transactive space, form, and inhabitation. Drawing upon diverse fields such as particle physics and biology, logic and geology, and lived histories as they are alternately formed by and trapped in the webs of culture, it offers a series of formal propositions in response to the critical acceptance of turbulence as a condition of twenty-first century life.