Michael Manning

迈克尔·曼宁
Most known for his series Phone Arts and Microsoft Store Paintings, these works explore the boundaries and limitations of stock image making software like Microsoft Paint. Manning uses these technologies to create his digital works, that are Abstract Expressionist in nature but persistent in their idiosyncratic Manning aesthetic. While these works begin as JPEGS, they are then printed onto canvas and brushed with a clear acrylic for texture, able to transcend the screen into the three dimensional gallery.

PEEPING TOM

le Salon
Peeping Tom est une compagnie de danse-théâtre bruxelloise fondée en 2000 par Gabriela Carrizo et Franck Chartier. Leur travail recherche le comportement idiosyncratique dans les relations et expériences personnelles, ce qui fait du public un voyeur dans le monde réaliste mais onirique qu’ils créent.

DANA CASPERSEN, WILLIAM FORSYTHE AND JOEL RYAN

White Bouncy Castle
The visitor’s unavoidable inclusion in the idiosyncratic kinetics of Dana Caspersen and William Forsythe’s «White Bouncy Castle» creates a choreographic space where there are no spectators, only participants. The choreography that appears, led by Joel Ryan’s encompassing soundtrack, is the result of complete physical destabilisation and the resulting social absurdity. The inadvertant euphoria that results from the situation is infectious and, in some cases, addictive.

Oliver Laric

2000 Cliparts

Oliver Laric’s work seeks to parse the productive potential of the copy, the bootleg, and the remix, and examine their role in the formation of both historic and contemporary image cultures. This process is intimately tied to his intuitive, idiosyncratic brand of scholarship, which he presents through an ongoing series of fugue-like expository videos (Versions, 2009—present), and further elaborates through his appropriated object works, videos, and sculptures, all of which are densely conceptually layered and often make use of recondite, technologically sophisticated methods of fabrication. Straddling the liminal spaces between the past and the present, the authentic and the inauthentic, the original and its subsequent reflections and reconfigurations, Laric’s work collapses categories and blurs boundaries in a manner that calls into question their very existence.