Schweigman & en Cocky Eek

Spectrum
How intensely can you experience colour? Colour as a phenomenon which you don’t just see, but which totally absorbs… Spectrum is a spatial installation that makes colour tactile and tangible.
Fall backwards into a black hole and reawaken in an infinite spectrum. An immersive experience which will give you a whole new perspective on the coloured cycles of our everyday light. Following Blaas and Curve, Spectrum completes a triptych centred on white space, each piece created with spatial designer Cocky Eek in collabaration with Schweigman&. In Blaas you crawl through an inflatable balloon; in Curve you enter an endlessly spiralling tunnel. Spectrum starts by asking: how can we make the colour physically tangible?

Wayne McGregor

Atomos

Atomos grows out of the smallest unit of matter. Bodies, movement, film, sound and light are atomised into miniature shards of intense sensation.Ten incredible dancers perform the unique style of Wayne McGregor – sculptural, rigorous, jarring and hauntingly beautiful. McGregor is accompanied by a team of sensational artists including longtime collaborators lighting designer Lucy Carter and filmmaker Ravi Deepres, and neo-classical ambient composers A Winged Victory For The Sullen.

Regine Schumann

colormirror dornbirn
Regine Schumann is a minimalist artist who works with Light Art, initially inspired by Color Field Painting and artists as Mark Rothko, Donald Judd and Dan Flavin. Schumann’s boxes and installations are made of acrylic colour plates especially produced for her. Her work is more than just Concrete Art. Conceptualized as emotive spaces, Schumann’s colour– lled light rooms provoke intense feelings of something otherworldly. Her minimalistic approach affects everything from her choice of materials to the way she plays with form and colour.

The Great Animal Orchestra

Bernie Krause

Bernie Krause is one of the world’s experts in natural sound, and here we listen through Krause’s ears as he collects the sounds of purring jaguars, snapping shrimp, cracking glaciers–and the roar of the wild. It is an intensely personal narrative of life as it hits the ears, and of the planet‘s deeply connected natural sounds and music.

Jordan Wolfson

요르단 울프슨
ジョーダンウォルフソン

Female Figure

The stare of the animatronic sculpture is so intense, it would put anyone uncomfortable. The mask is probably there as a way to avoid creating a human face using animatronics but it also definitely adds to the creepiness of the overall look. The importance of the gaze is found throughout Wolfson’s work but it finds here a very special interpretation. He gives the ability to gaze to two different entities, a stripper and a robot, who are by definition never supposed to look up. The visitor is no longer in control of the situation, creating the awkwardness that is at the core of the work.

lauren dimaya krystal li heidy cordero arias

every time the stars align
FILE LED SAO PAULO 2018
“Every Time the Stars Align” fuses different natural elements of crystals, plasma and flowers in a lava lamp environment. Red crystals freeze with rigid edges and thaws into a relaxing mood. Plasma liquid rises and falls reflecting a lava-like quality. Flowers fluctuate between a spectrum of color symbolizing intense human affections. Contradicting and uniting flat and deep spaces, the three elements compose and decompose.

IANNIS XENAKIS

PITHOPRAKTA
During the 1950s and early 1960s‚ Iannis Xenakis represented an alternative avant­garde‚ with a radical approach to form and texture that rejected the serial mechanics of Boulez and Stockhausen‚ and involved a uniquely intense interpretation of ideas about probability and randomness. A world away from John Cage’s laid­back experiments[…] The two short orchestral works‚ Metastasis and Pithoprakta‚ are undoubtedly far more austere‚ more primitive in their overall effect‚ than the exuberant‚ hyperactive Eonta‚ whose ferociously demanding writing for piano and five brass players pulsates with the kind of creative energy that the orchestral pieces seek to suppress.

Cerith Wyn Evans

СЕРИС ВИН ЭВАНС
ケリス·ウィン·エヴァンス
Form in Space…By Light

‘Cerith’s installation sits beautifully within the space, unfolding as you walk through,’ explains Clarrie Wallis, Tate’s Senior Curator of Contemporary British Art. The neon experience builds, from a single ‘peep hole’ ring in the South Duveens, through which you can glimpse swirls of radial light and an imposing octagon in the central gallery. The fractured neon fragments look like frantically drawn sparkler-lines on fireworks night.But there’s method and logic within these celestial scribbles. Hidden in the design are references to a host of highbrow sources, from Japanese ‘Noh’ theatre, to Marcel Duchamp’s The Bride Stripped Bare by her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass), 1915-23. Don’t worry if you missed them. The beauty of rendering precise (verging on obscure) references in such a celebratory neon explosion allows for multiple – if not endless – interpretations.Each way you look at the sprawling 2km of neon tubing, a different shape or symbol emerges. No small thanks to the elegant way in which the structures have been painstakingly suspended. ‘There were over 1000 fixing points, and obviously we couldn’t drill 1000 holes in the Grade II listed building,’ Wallis explains. ‘We had to work with structural engineers very intensely, so as to be completely happy and convinced that we would be able to remove it without damaging the fabric of the building.’Though it seems too soon to be discussing the installation’s removal, Wallis has a point. It’s a visibly fragile, delicate sculpture – whose impermanence makes it more intriguing. As it is a site-specific sculpture, it can’t be recreated elsewhere. What’s more, because the neon tubes are filled with a constantly moving stream of pulsing, vibrating gasses, visitors will never see the same sculpture twice.