Sun Yuan and Peng Yu

Can’t Help Myself
Constructed of a Kuka industrial robot arm, ‘Can’t Help Myself’ is programmed to do one thing: contain a viscous, deep-red liquid within a fixed area. When the blood-like substance pools too much, this activates the robot’s sensors causing the arm to swivel, flex, and shovel the liquid back to the center leaving splashes and smudges in its wake.

MIKE PELLETIER

МАЙК ПЕЛЛЕТЬЕ
Peristaltic Skin
Questo era un progetto di collaborazione con Lucy McRae creato per il Transnatural Festival nel 2010. La Peristaltic Skin Machine è una sperimentazione sul corpo con liquido, aria, velocità e colore.

shiro takatani

高谷史郎
史郎の高谷
ST\LL

Die Wassermatrix (Matrice liquide 3D, auf Französisch) ist eine Robotermaschine, die in Echtzeit Wasserskulpturen erstellt und eine kontinuierliche Entwicklung von Formen und Bildern zum Leben erweckt. Diese Installation schafft vergängliche Skulpturen, die der Betrachter in ständiger Beobachtung und Überraschung festhält, fast eine Metapher des berühmten Flusses Heraklit, in dem „alles fließt, alles sich ändert, nichts übrig bleibt. Tore. Die Idee der 3D-Flüssigmatrix wurde 2001 bei einem Besuch in Lille, der Kulturhauptstadt Europas, geboren, wo Shiro Takatani einen Roboterbrunnenschreiber projizierte, der seine Botschaften übermitteln sollte, indem er eine Reihe flüssiger Buchstaben auf den Teich fallen ließ. Leider existierte die Technologie noch nicht und er musste warten, um einen zuverlässigen technischen Partner mit umfassender Erfahrung im Bau digitaler Wasservorhänge als Lumiartecnia Internacional zu finden. Zwei renommierte Digitalkünstler haben während der Roboterkunstausstellung die Kunstwerke für die Wassermatrix entwickelt: Shiro Takatani und Christian Partos. Shiro Takatanis Kunstwerk schafft eine räumliche Erfahrung, die mehrere Schichten paralleler Tröpfchen erzeugt, die auf magische Weise in der Luft zu schweben scheinen, und für Momente, in denen sie sich aus dem Teich erheben und wieder fallen, in sich unmöglich entwickelnden Kreationen, die der Schwerkraft zu trotzen scheinen. Christian Partos Kunstwerk schafft Sequenzen von Wasserskulpturen, die die Fähigkeit der Wassermatrix zeigen, sofort vergängliche Wasserformen zu erzeugen, die im Teich unten verschwinden, um eine neue zu gebären, und auf diese Weise ein konstant fließendes Video von 3D-Skulpturen zu erstellen, als ob sie es wären waren Fotogramme aus einem Film.

Ujoo+limheeyoung

Fountain with Red
Stainless steel, water pump, red liquid, urethane paint. Ujoo+limheeyoung is the husband and wife team of media artists Ujoo and Limheeyoung. Since first working together in 2004 in preparation for design competition, they have been involved in projects that use a variety of means of visual expression – kinect expression sculpture, drawings, real-time interactive videos – to address the theme of absurdity of reality.

ANDREW KUDLESS

P_wall (the self-organization of material)
P_Wall (2009) was commissioned by the SFMOMA Architecture and Design Curator Henry Urbach for the exhibition Sensate: Bodies and Design. The wall, part of a series started with P_Wall (2006), is an evolution of the earlier work exploring the self-organization of material under force. Using nylon fabric and wooden dowels as form-work, the weight of the liquid plaster slurry causes the fabric to sag, expand, and wrinkle.

lauren dimaya krystal li heidy cordero arias

every time the stars align
FILE LED SAO PAULO 2018
“Every Time the Stars Align” fuses different natural elements of crystals, plasma and flowers in a lava lamp environment. Red crystals freeze with rigid edges and thaws into a relaxing mood. Plasma liquid rises and falls reflecting a lava-like quality. Flowers fluctuate between a spectrum of color symbolizing intense human affections. Contradicting and uniting flat and deep spaces, the three elements compose and decompose.

Yann Marussich

Bleu Remix
In his spectacle-installation Bleu Remix, Yann Marussich returns to a theme originally explored in Bleu Provisoire (2001), a spectacle in which a mysterious blue liquid oozes through the layers of his skin as though it were the final effect or by-product of his body’s inner processes. In Bleu Remix, the artist once more invites the viewer to experience an intimate journey through the corners of his body. Each time the spectacle is performed, a different (local) musician accompanies Marussich. This unique, singular confrontation establishes a new relationship between the sound and image. The meeting of the two artists brings an element of risk and uniqueness to the event, as if the music explores the spectacle repeatedly, resulting in new ways of perception.

Sterling Ruby

ACTS/ALPHA BLOCKER
In ACTS—short for “Absolute Contempt for Total Serenity”—Ruby captures liquid dye inside clear urethane and balances these pure prisms atop scuffed, inscribed, and spray-painted Formica bases. These works expand upon his earlier Formica sculptures such as Big Grid/DB Deth (2008), a scratched-up monolith that exudes a cold, prisonlike institutional menace. In ACTS, the juxtaposition of unfeeling laminate slabs against vibrantly pigmented urethane is a potent one; it transforms the urethane from a passive, glassy vitrine into an active agent of incarceration that suffocates the blossoming furls of dye.

Elizabeth Ogilvie

the liquid room

Elizabeth Ogilvie is a Scottish artist who uses water as a medium and as a research focus. Water is the obsession which returns in most of her works and it becomes experience through the use of installations and videos. Her work embraces universal and timeless concerns, offering her public an innocent pleasure and at the same time underlining philosophical and ecological issues.
Through her installations, the artist isolates water inside an artificial state, creating a process which highlights its fundamental qualities in order to return to its place of origin which is the natural habitat. Among her most important works there is Liquid Room realized in 2002. Inside a derelict warehouse the artist created basins with water which were crossed by a footbridge. By linking art, architecture and science, she realized an interactive installation where the visitor, walking on the footbridge, can touch the water, whose movement is reflected on the walls of the installation. In 2006 she created Bodies of Water, whose operation took over from her previous work.
Once again, through a series of installations, the public was able to share the experience of sensorial involvement within an environment dominated by water.