LUNDÉN ARCHITECTURE COMPANY

Une autre générosité
Another Generosity explore une nouvelle structure qui consiste en une membrane contenant deux éléments de base: l’air et l’eau. Les structures simples sont combinées pour créer une structure cellulaire visible et dynamique. Les éléments gonflés servent d’intermédiaire entre l’environnement naturel et bâti. Ils répondent à des stimuli externes et parfois invisibles, créant un nouveau type d’expérience, une hésitation momentanée qui augmente notre conscience de notre environnement.

Felix Worseck

parabolic soap

Créée par Felix Worseck à l’Université des Arts de Berlin (Digitale Klasse), l’installation «savon parabolique» est une fusion de comportement artificiel / mécanique et naturel. Le but de l’installation est de produire une surface paraboloïde qui peut être déplacée pendant environ 60 secondes. Cette surface minimale n’est créée qu’après la connexion de la membrane et la rupture de la piscine de savon. Les mouvements des moteurs pas à pas sont arbitraires. Ils sont contrôlés par un programme Arduino qui attribue des valeurs aléatoires à chaque passage à la hauteur des quatre axes de contrôle. Une fois la membrane de savon séparée de la base, la machine revient à l’état initial et la séquence recommence.

Whyixd

Through the Membrane
We define the space around us by observing and perceiving light and shadow. That is to say, our perception shapes our basic understanding of this sensory world, and hence the “reality” we believe in. If our experiential knowledge and awareness of space are challenged, would our definition of a “real phenomenon” also be changed? Through the Membrane utilizes optical polarizers to change how light passes through space. The installation does not rely on any electromechanical devices. Simply with creative use of material and structure, it presents a super-sensory experience in space where reality and illusion are inextricably juxtaposed.

Anke Eckardt

Between I you I and I me
BETWEEN | YOU | AND | ME is a wall of sound and light. Like any other wall, it defines an architectural space. Given its ephemeral, dynamic media – ultrasound and beams of light – the wall can be perceived only when the visitor comes close and interacts with it. Two thin membranes of light form a visible frame filled with sound. Multichannel, extremely vectored hypersonic speakers render audible various textures of broken glass: a sound architecture within the wall, comprised of juxtaposed single sound beams, whose constellation changes depending on the visitor’s position. Observed from a distance, the wall fades away: clear transparency and only faintly resonant tones attest to its non-existence.

Tatiana Plakhova

Antrum
The installation looks like a grotto of the membrane, the surface of which is inhabited by strange creatures. It’s complex structure causes association with living creatures, space objects and architectural constructions. In this frontier word pure mathematical abstractions are mixed with natural shapes, resulting in formation of new entities. Viewers can push the membrane and try to contact with them.

SEBASTIAN WOLF

Brume
In the collaborative work Brume fog emerges from and self-organizes on the surface on a sculptural element, congealing with light into an elusive stratum. The installation utilizes a series of ultrasonic transducers that generate thick clouds of dense, yet extremely lightweight water vapor. Fog is produced in an inner chamber contained within an enclosure that is outfitted with a porous surface. A small radial blower inside the apparatus gently pumps air into the inner chamber lifting the fog through the membrane, whereby it “settles” on the surface. Viewed from a distance, the fog appears as a visualized mass of air circumscribing the perimeter of the enclosure.

Lundén Architecture Company

Another Generosity
Another Generosity explores a new structure that consists of a membrane holding two basic elements: air and water. The simple structures are combined to create a visible and dynamic cellular structure. The inflated elements mediate between the natural and built environment. They respond to external and sometimes unseen stimuli, creating a new kind of experience, a momentary hesitation that heightens our awareness of our surroundings.

PHILIP BEESLEY

菲力浦 畢斯雷

Hylozoic Ground

The project’s title refers to ‘hylozoism’, the ancient belief that all matter has life. Hylozoic Ground offers a vision for a new generation of responsive architecture. The Hylozoic Ground environment can be described as a suspended geotextile that gradually accumulates hybrid soil from ingredients drawn from its surroundings. Akin to the functions of a living system, embedded machine intelligence allows human interaction to trigger breathing, caressing, and swallowing motions and hybrid metabolic exchanges. These empathic motions ripple out from hives of kinetic valves and pores in peristaltic waves, creating a diffuse pumping that pulls air, moisture and stray organic matter through the filtering Hylozoic membranes.

SaintMachine

INNERFORM 8
The moment you hold your breath, the membrane opens and reveals a hermetically sealed head carrying a uniquecavity where senses are mixed.

Numen/For Use

N-Light Membrane

Built and designed by Numen/For Use, N-Light Membrane is a giant cube with three out of the six surfaces made of flexible membrane (foil mirror) with an air tank and a compressor connected to it. The other three mirrors are semi transparent spy-glass. By inflating or deflating the air tank, the membrane turns convex or concave, deforming the reflections within.

KAZUHIRO KOJIMA

moon tensegrity membrane structure

This is an experimental housing complex that sought to regenerate the shops-cum-houses in an old area of Hanoi, Vietnam. This district, popularly known as “the 36th street district”, is composed primarily of houses inhabited by traditionally large Chinese families. The buildings have narrow frontages and an unusually extended depth of 70-80 m. These high-density, low-rise buildings were considered to be a comfortable domestic environment until the changes of government in Vietnam during the 20th century.
Han,” became such a high-density city (1,000 people per hectare} that many families began to live together within one unit and even to transform courtyards into actual rooms. As a result the standard of living deteriorated.